Windows 10 Creator’s Update New Features

The rollout begins 2017-04-17… Get ready!

Introduction
The latest version of Windows, the Creators Update, was released to the public on 2017-04-11. Officially, its Microsoft has listed it as Windows 10 Build 15063.138 KB4015583. While that link points to a cumulative update that provides fixes to updated time zone information and security updates to a number of core OS components including Hyper-V, Kernel Mode Drivers, IE, Edge, Windows OLE and Active Directory Federation Services, the larger update is a whole new version of Windows 10.

Microsoft has indicated that it’s going to be rolling the Creators Update out over the following months. However, it is possible to download it immediately. Neowin has a great article with instructions for getting it now, instead of waiting for it to manually show up in Windows Update. If you have to have the bits now, use the Neowin link to (eventually) get to the easy to follow instructions.

So, given that its available now, what does the Creator’s Update include? Well, you’ve come to the right place. The Creators Update contains the following Windows goodness…

Privacy Controls
The Windows 10 Creators Update contains enhanced privacy controls. On a new Windows 10 install or an upgraded PC, you’re going to be prompted to review the privacy configuration on your PC. What you’ll see is a bit of an explanation of what Microsoft is collecting and can determine if it’s something you want to share with them or not. While this is required for Windows as a Service – or WaaS – Microsoft is wise to clearly state what they’re collecting and why.

Security Updates
Along with all of the privacy stuff, you also get improved, general security features. Windows now contains an updated version of Defender, called the Defender Security Center. This new applet works much like the older Security Center/ Action Center did in previous versions of Windows, but it provides this information in a centralized dashboard view. You also get a new Refresh Windows Tool that’s now called Fresh Start. Thankfully, you should be able to perform a clean installation of Windows with it, without any and all bloatware that came with the OEM version of Windows that came on your OEM hardware.

Update Controls
You get better control over Windows Update in the Creators Update. While this still isn’t crystal clear, Windows 10 Professional and above users can now very easily pause updates in Settings. Windows 10 Home users are still held to Microsoft’s update schedule, so if you’re a consumer… you’re kinda outta luck here.

Deeper Cortana integration
Microsoft’s personal, digital assistant is a bit more personal and a bit more digital in the Creators Update. Cortana’s moved a bit closer to the center of what you’re doing and while you may not want all of your personal information shared with her, she’s still going to be a bit closer to it, here, than she was before.

Microsoft Edge Improvements
Not that a lot of people care, but Microsoft’s done its best to improve the browser that no one wants to use… Edge now has an eBook store and an eBook reader built into Edge. You also get a better way to manage browser tabs, too, as well as a bunch of other stuff (that, as I said, no one is really gonna care about…)

Gaming Improvements
Gamers rejoice! You’ll want to get the Creators update as soon as you can. This new version of Windows 1- brings a Game Mode feature to Windows that will help you optimize your PC for games, and provides Beam broadcasting integration

Windows Applet Updates
While not specifically tied to the Creators Update, applets that come with Windows like Mail, Calendar, Groove, Movies & TV, maps, Paint, etc. have and should continue to improve and be updated more regularly going forward. Yes, the Universal Windows Platform version of these things isn’t all that great, but it’s going to help get and keep them current.

Conclusion
I am not going to review the Creators Update. There’s really no need to. Every Windows 10 user is going to get it at some point, anyway. You aren’t going to be able to opt out or delay/ postpone it indefinitely. Period.

However, if you can, you might want to wait a bit before taking the dive and updating. There’s going to be some level of issue fall out related to this and the best thing you can do is to wait until an update to the update comes out, so that you don’t get hit with the “slings and arrows of outrageous” update bugs.

Let the early adopters take the hit and deal with the problems.

While most of the issues are likely worked out already – and Microsoft Surface Pro and Surface Book, as well as other Signature PC users, are likely ok to update now – if you don’t want to chance it, you can wait until the update gets to your PC and then don’t restart for a bit, or if you can, defer the update to a later date.

However, there’s not too much to be concerned about here. The Creators Update has been tested internally (at Microsoft) tested in the Windows Insider Fast Right, Windows Insider Slow Ring and Windows Insider Release Candidate Ring. You’re pretty safe here.

Ultimately, this is your choice; but either one – go now or defer as long as you can – are good choices.

The Windows 10 Creators Update will begin rolling out starting on Tuesday, April 11, 2017. I will do my best to keep my ear to the ground and will let everyone know how things go.

Related Posts:

Give the Governor, hu-rumph!

I bumped into something that I want to add my own $0.02 (two cents) to…

Not many folks around today will recognize the title of this article. It’s a line from the 1974 (now classic) comedy, Blazing Saddles; and I’m crying right now with laughter, going over the scene in my head…

Anyway, I often use the line when I’m looking for people to blindly agree with me (the underlying context of the quote…) and I also often use it when I agree with something that others have said. I bumped into something that a former coworker said today while reading some email and browsing the internet and I wanted to post it here to show my agreement, but I also wanted to add my own two cents to the subject.

Paul Thurrott’s Short Takes are a throwback to his WUGNET days. Paul put out a newsletter every Friday where he humorously recapped the tech happenings of the week. He continued that after he started his Supersite for Windows and continues it still on Thurrott.com today.

Anyway, in his Short Takes for Friday 2017-04-01, Paul had the following to say regarding the rollout of the Windows 10 Creator’s Update,

Microsoft: Windows 10 Creators Update will roll out over “several months”

After a wide-ranging series of reliability and quality issues scuttled Microsoft’s plans to deploy last summer’s Windows 10 Anniversary Update within a few months, the software giant has reset its expectations for the Creators Update, which will begin rolling out in April. This time, Microsoft says, the upgrade process will occur “over a period of several months,” but on purpose, so that users will have a more “seamless” (read: error-free) experience. You might argue that this is the right approach. But I think this exposes the soft underbelly of Microsoft’s “Windows as a service” (WaaS) plans, which is that this legacy software is too big, complex, and rooted in the 1990s to work well as a service. And that what really needs to happen is a more aggressive removal of legacy technologies from the platform until WaaS can actually make sense. And yes, I’m looking at you, Win32. It’s time to make some tough decisions.

The issue that I wanted to touch on was the WaaS comment.

Windows as a Service has been a question on the lips of the world since Office 365 was introduced a few years ago. Office works as a service because the code base is finite. The components are well known and controlled. There aren’t different extensions for Office and different driver sets, needed to make it run on different processors or chipsets. It needs Windows in order to do this. Office is a much simpler “platform,” if you will, to convert to a service from a standalone product.

Windows itself is a different story entirely.

Paul is right indicating that it’s got a great deal of gunk to get rid of, before it can become a service platform. Windows has a great deal of 32bit code that needs to be ripped out of the OS, before it will be on a common enough codebase where it can be common enough and easily maintainable enough. The biggest problem is all of the different hardware combinations, requiring all of the different drivers that exist for those combinations.

Keeping all that straight and all that together from a service perspective, is going to be one hell of a job. In fact, there are products out there now that try to monitor the drivers you have on your computer and notify you when they get updated. They don’t work very well; and they’re somewhat expensive.

Windows biggest problems have always been its drivers. There are so many different devices, accessories and tools that require a driver in order to connect and work with your computer. Many of them, unfortunately, are enterprise level devices – those that are used for work – and are unfortunately tied to a 32bit driver base that needs to be retired and ripped out of the “current” version of Windows. When that happens, all those legacy devices will become unsupported.

Note – many already are. This is not a new problem. Every time a version of Windows is retired and becomes unsupported, some kind of corporate, mission critical, medical device, manufacturing sensor or label printer becomes unusable.

Dealing with this issue – driver obsolescence – is the core problem that Win32 has. Finding a way of dealing with this and with the corporate mission critical device issue is going to be what saves the whole concept of WaaS – Windows as a service – from what will likely be a very difficult start. Unfortunately, it’s going to be the enterprise market that really makes or breaks WaaS. The consumer market, while likely “easier” than the enterprise market, still has the Win32 and driver management issues to get past.

Are you interested in WaaS as either a consumer or enterprise customer? What is it about WaaS that attracts you? How big of an issue are outdated drivers and driver updates to you? Do you think that Microsoft can completely strip Win32 legacy code out of Windows to make it easier to manage and better performing in time enough for WaaS to be relevant? Is there, in fact, a time limit on this..?

I’d love to hear from you. Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area below and give me your thoughts on WaaS, 3rd party driver update apps and services, as well as Win32 legacy code and mission critical peripherals at your place of work?

Related Posts:

Windows 10 Creator Update Release Date Announced

The Windows 10 Creator’s Update will be released on 2017-04-11.

Today is the world is abuzz with the news that Microsoft will be releasing its much touted Windows 10 Creator’s Update on 2017-04-11. This update will work with all Windows 10 Anniversary Update compatible PC’s and is specifically intended for Microsoft’s larger, touch screen enabled, all in one PC, the Microsoft Surface Studio.

Yusuf Mehdi, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for the Windows and devices group calls the Creator’s Update a “pretty major” one. He further states that its “[Microsoft’s] vision is to empower the creator in all of us.”

When I jumped back into the Surface, with the Surface Book, I also jumped back into the Windows 10 Insider program on the Slow Ring. This means that the code that I’m getting is still prerelease code – still a beta – but is much more stable than other betas in other rings in the program. I’m liking what I’m seeing; but so far, for me, the Creator’s Update isn’t as big as Microsoft is making it out to be. I haven’t seen anything THAT major…yet.

However, that doesn’t mean that there isn’t a lot going on. Here are seven of probably the biggest and most notable items in the Creator’s Update that you’ll notice, even if you DON’T pick up a Surface Studio – which, by the way, starts at $2999.99.

  • Paint 3D
    Paint has been around since Windows 3.x. Its seen a few updates in terms of UI/UX; but its functionality has remained pretty constant – provide some basic way for a user to create a bitmap. The app now supports creating graphics in 2D or 3D formats. If you have a 3D printer, you can print your 3D creation as well…
  • Photos & Maps
    If you’re so inclined, you can now take your Surface Pen – or other supported stylus – and mark up graphics or maps in their respective apps. It’s not ground breaking, but it can be fun.
  • Microsoft EDGE
    Despite Microsoft’s best efforts, users still do NOT prefer either IE or EDGE. Most Windows users are using Chrome before either MS browser. However, EDGE is now faster, more secure and easier on your battery, and that last, ESPECIALLY over Chrome, which is a known battery hog. Microsoft claims an hour more use while watching streaming video using EDGE vs. Chrome.

Updates to EDGE include the following:

  1. The ability to preview visual thumbnails of your open tabs by hovering over a given tab.
  2. The ability to set aside open tabs to reference later, bringing them back by selecting a “restore tabs” button.
  3. EDGE now offers a variety of extensions including a Pinterest Pin It Button, Amazon Assistant (surfacing deals), and a Translator extension that lets you translate Web pages in more than 50 languages. EDGE also has an MS Office extension, letting you view and edit files without having Office installed on your computer.
  4. Microsoft has created an eBook Store as part of the Windows Store, where users may buy eBooks and read them in EDGE. Microsoft isn’t sharing how many books will be available in the Windows Store at launch.
  • Security
    The Creator’s Update includes a new Windows Defender Security Center. With it, you can examine the overall security status of your system. By clicking on a Health Report , you can your computer’s most recent scan results. The details of this system are still coming together, so I would expect updates to this new component to be available in a Patch Tuesday deployment near you.
  • Gaming
    Windows 10 now has a dedicated Gaming section in Settings now, and includes a Game Mode that is turned on by default. Game Mode prioritizes system resources when your gaming to insure that you get the best gaming experience from your hardware. This includes optimizations to the new game streaming process that Microsoft acquired last August from Beam. I know my oldest boy will be thankful for this when he streams games from our Xbox One. You will also be able to play games via the Xbox app on either your Xbox One or Windows 10 PC in the near future.
  • Color Adjusted Night-Time Display
    A number of different folks have issues with blue-based light in the evening. Studies have shown that exposing yourself to too much blue light before you go to bed can create sleep related issues. In other words, computing before bed makes it hard to fall asleep.A new feature in the Creator’s Update allows you to alter the color pallet on your display automatically so that you get warmer colors in the evening. The warmer colors on your monitor are supposed to help you sleep (or not be kept awake too long after calling it quits for the night). All I’ve noticed so far is that it can make everything on your monitor appear a little yellowy. I have no idea if this is going to make a difference in the long run, though you can use this as well as a new feature to limit the amount of time your kids spend on the PC as well as on the Xbox One’s version of the Creator’s Update.
  • Augmented and Mixed Reality
    Put this more in the coming soon category, but the Creators Update will support the first Windows Mixed Reality-enabled headsets when they arrive later this year from Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP and Lenovo, at a starting price of $299.Microsoft says that the headsets will have built in sensors, that will enable you to walk around a room without the need for any external markers or sensors. This will more easily mark your boundaries . Unfortunately, it’s not clear if this is also going to come to any consumer version of the HoloLens or not. However, these enhancements are eagerly anticipated by many; and should be fun to try when they’re available.

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox

Find us on Facebook