Play LAN games through Internet with Tunngle

Let’s face it. Gaming is a lot more fun when you play with people you like. Not every networkable game supports gaming across the internet, though. This is one of the reasons why I like Tunngle. It’s a network gaming utility for Windows.

Tunngle makes multiplayer games enjoyable, regardless of your location. Tunngle is a P2P VPN gaming client, enabling LAN party mode via the Internet. Any game with a built-in LAN mode, whether old or new, can be played over the internet through Tunngle.

In order to accomplish its magic, Tunngle installs a VPN driver. The driver is included with the app. There isn’t a separate executable for this. The VPN driver is required for use with the Tunngle network. The app also requires you to create a free network account in order to access its resources.

The app’s main display has active networks on the left hand side, as well as under the Community tab. Tunngle comes with a number of these already active, of course. A double click can get you going. For users who know the games they are looking for, searching for an active game is easy.

The app also supports Calendar Dates The integrated event calendar helps you find and remind you of scheduled game. The app’s Network settings and optics adjustments can be found under the System tab. Here you can configure options for your network router, as well audio settings and the app’s general look and feel.

Download Tunngle

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Social networking creates big vulnerabilities

After an eight-month study, Palo Alto Networks (an enterprise security and firewall company) released a report that provides a global view into application usage by assessing 28 exabytes of application traffic from 1,253 enterprises between October 2010 and April 2011.

More than 40% of the 1,042 applications that Palo Alto Networks identified on enterprise networks can now use SSL or hop ports to increase their availability within corporate networks. This segment of applications will continue to grow as more applications follow Twitter, Facebook, and Gmail, who all have enabled SSL either as a standard setting or as a user-selectable option in an effort to create the perception of improved security for its end-users.

Contrary to popular opinion, social networking has not meant the death knell of webmail and instant messenger (IM). Compared with 12 months ago, IM traffic, as a percentage of overall traffic has more than doubled, while webmail and social networking increased nearly five times.

As browser-based file sharing applications now use peer-based technology and add clients as a “premium”, the question arises: will the business and security risks introduced by browser-based file sharing follow the same path as those that were introduced by P2P? The frequency of file transfer applications – 92% of FTP, 82% of P2P, and 91% browser-based file sharing—each provide business value, but represent security and business risks that may include exploits, malware vectors, and data loss.

Rene Bonvanie, vice-president of marketing at Palo Alto Networks declared:

“This data should be a wake-up call for IT teams who assume encrypted traffic is mainly HTTPS or for those who still believe that social networking usage is not taking place on their corporate networks.”

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