Windows 10 Mobile Released

Windows10-Mobile-wallpaper-img5

 

 

There’s at least some good news for those that have Windows Phones…

The last couple of days has been kinda brutal on Windows Phone. With Nokia essentially killing all of its Windows Phone apps, including HERE Maps, it’s been a rough week.

That is, until now… well… maybe.

If you have one of the following Windows Mobile devices, you need to stop everything and take a trip over to this link on your Windows Phone. When you do, Internet Explorer Mobile will open to a page for Upgrade Advisor. Tapping Get App will take you to the same page in the Windows Phone Store where you can download the app to your phone.

Upgrade Advisor is an app that will check to see if there’s a Windows 10 Mobile upgrade available for your device. Currently eligible devices include the following:

 

 

Lumia Devices:

  • 1520
  • 930
  • 640
  • 640XL
  • 730
  • 735
  • 830
  • 532
  • 535
  • 540
  • 635 1GB
  • 636 1GB
  • 638 1GB
  • 430
  • 435

BLU Devices

  • Win HD w510u
  • Win HD LTE
  • x150q

MCJ Devices

  • Madosma Q501

You should know that only supported devices will get a free upgrade to Windows 10 Mobile. Due to performance issues, not every existing Windows Phone 8 device will get the upgrade. According to Microsoft, “many older devices are not able to successfully upgrade without an impact on the customer experience.”

If you upgrade your device, and you don’t like the results, the experience; or if you feel the performance is bad, you can download the Windows Device Recovery Tool (Direct Download Link) and put Windows Phone 8 back on the device. The Windows Device Recovery Tool has been updated to support all of the noted devices, if they weren’t supported already.

WDRT 3.1.6

According to some support forums that I’ve seen, the following functionality is either missing or deprecated on upgraded devices:

  • Me Tile no longer supported
  • Me Card no longer supported.
  • Cortana can no longer search for
    • apps
    • settings
    • email
    • text messages
    • contacts
    • QR Codes
    • can no longer open apps through voice commands.
  • “Hey Cortana” is no longer available on some upgraded devices.
  • Group tiles can no longer be used to receive social networking status updates.
  • Indoor Maps are no longer available for some locations.
  • Certain enterprise features, including Data Protection Under Lock, are not available. Please contact your Microsoft Volume Licensing representative for more information.
  • At time of Windows 10 Mobile’s release Outlook Mail app cannot open .EML attachments.
  • Outlook Calendar app does not support Tasks.
  • The MDM functionality to prevent saving and sharing Office documents is not supported.

I am currently in the process of upgrading my BLU Win HD LTE device and will have an article posted on the actual upgrade, upgrade experience and anything of note that I find while playing with it afterwards.

Stay tuned for more coverage!

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Nokia Kills HERE Maps for Windows Phone

Now, you truly can’t get there from HERE…

here_maps

In a move that likely has many wondering how long Satya Nadella will allow Windows 10 Mobile to continue to exist, it seems that one of the main staples of the platform, HERE Maps will no longer be developed for Windows 10 Mobile or for Windows Phone, for that matter.

When Microsoft failed to purchase Nokia’s HERE software assets along with Nokia’s hardware business, Nokia decided to sell the asset(s) to an automotive consortium. When that happened, the software disappeared from the Windows Store. The app returned a while after, but apparently, the software is set to make a permanent exist from the platform entire.

Recently, HERE announced that it will be removing ALL of its apps from the Windows Store, including HERE Maps before the end of March 2016.

“In the last few months, we made the HERE apps compatible with Windows 10 by using a workaround that will no longer be effective after June 30, 2016. To continue offering the HERE apps for Windows 10 would require us to redevelop the apps from the ground up, a scenario that led to the business decision to remove our apps from the Windows 10 store.

This means the HERE apps will no longer work on devices running Windows 10 mobile after June 30, 2016. To prepare for this change, we have also decided to remove the HERE apps from the Windows 10 store on March 29, 2016.”

While HERE Maps will continue to work on Windows Phone 8 devices without any kind of disruption, post 2016-03-29, HERE has said that it won’t update the software OR the Maps on that platform at all, except for “critical bug fixes.”

According to HERE, the software is deeply integrated into the Windows Phone OS; and during the development of Windows 10 Mobile, platform changes were made. They felt that the required effort to make the software work on Windows 10 Mobile wasn’t worth the development and testing costs.

While I have a Windows Phone 8 device – a BLU Win HD LTE – that is supposed to be upgradable to Windows 10, this is a bit problematic. One of the biggest draws for Windows Phone/ Windows 10 Mobile is HERE Drive (part of HERE Maps). Without this flagship application, reasons for using devices on the Windows 10 Mobile or Windows Phone 8 platform have substantially decreased. Honestly, with the lack of apps out there for Windows Mobile/ Windows Phone, now that Maps is gone, there really isn’t much use for the platform at all.

Period.

What do you think of this development? Is this the [final] nail in the Windows Phone coffin? Does the platform have any kind of future at all? Why don’t you sound off in the comments section below and let me know what you think?

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In-Flight Cellphone Calls to be Banned?

The US DoT is moving towards banning in-flight calls

phone

The use of electronic devices on plane flights has been banned for a number of years, not only in the US, but worldwide. Originally, the thought was that the electro-magnetic radiation or EMR from these devices would interfere with onboard aviation equipment. So the FAA banned their use on flights in the US. Recently, that policy has changed.

Last October, the FAA announced that it would permit the use of all electronic devices during all phases of flight. This meant that you didn’t necessarily have to turn off your iPad or iPod when the doors closed and you had your nose reducing headphones plugged in, turned on and pumping music through your ears during take off. No more crying and screaming children for you!

However, this also meant that you could conceivably spend the entire flight next to Chatty Cathy as she gabbed away on her cell phone at 35,000 feet. However, according to the DoT, the agency is preparing some rules that may prevent just that.

While the FAA hasn’t laid down any new rules, and the DoT hasn’t come out with anything definitive as yet, its clear that the airline carriers are considering making some rules of their own. Your time next to Chatty Cathy may be totally cut off if they get their way, so you may be saved from all of the grief.

As of this writing – 2014-08-11 – I am currently sitting in the O’Hare International Airport waiting on a flight to Pittsburgh, PA for a job interview. I’m flying the Friendly Skies, so United has my business on both legs of this trip. In my opinion, United has been one of the more restrictive carriers with passenger privileges and freedoms in Coach. It will be interesting to see how things go after I get on board.

UPDATE:
OK, well, this is already partially implemented…at least on United. They allow use of portable electronic devices at all times on the plane. When the doors close, they tell you smartphones and tablets with cellular have to be put in airplane mode. Wireless headsets are permitted, but no Wi-Fi. The flight I was on didn’t have in-flight Wi-Fi.

I fully expect that despite what the FAA or the DoT implement as rules or guidelines, that the airline carriers will do what they want. They will likely further limit the use of electronic devices on domestic and international flights originating in the US. Despite what the regulatory agencies specify, passengers will be required to follow the rules the carriers lay down. Failure to do so, will get you booted and likely banned (depending on how you behave). Its going to be an interesting time. I will continue to follow the issue and will report back with any new updates.

In the mean time, why don’t you meet me in the discussion area, below and let me know what you think the FAA and DoT should outline in any new regulations? I’d also like to hear what you think the airlines will do, too; so jump in and give me your thoughts!

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Android on Windows..?

Wait, what..?! Microsoft is going way past Project Normandy if they’re considering this…

Android on windows2

 The other day I wrote about how Nokia was pulling together the final touches on a low-end Android phone to compete in developing and emerging markets where high-end phones don’t sell well. That grinds against the traditional wheels in the Microsoft machine. Traditionally, thems is feudin’ words…at least in Redmond.

However, I stumbled across a couple other articles yesterday, including one from Mary Jo Foley (totally love her column), that really had me thinking, and I wanted to take a bit of time to try to wrap my head around all of it. Apparently, Microsoft is considering going well beyond an Android phone. They are actively considering – I think debating might be a better word, and strongly debating at that – not only releasing an Android phone, but they are considering the possibility of allowing Android apps to run on all Windows Phones, and on Windows tablets (think Surface RT/2 and Surface Pro/2 Pro) as well on traditional Windows laptops and desktops.

Wait, what?! That last part confused me…

The big problem honestly gets down to 3rd party development resources and the reach of Windows Phone. Windows Phone has a VERY small share of the smartphone market right now. In fact, its single digit small, where Android and iOS share double digit ownership of the number one and two spots, respectively. I’ve heard many 3rd party developers say that they would like to make apps for Windows Phone, but the sales just don’t justify the resource and development costs. As a way to get Windows powered devices (again not only phones and tablets, but computers as well) in the hands of more people, Microsoft is trying to figure out a way (the best way..?) to get Android apps to run on Windows devices. That could be Pokki, or it could be something else.

The first thing that crossed my mind was RIM/Blackberry, who (eventually) tried this strategy when they released their failed and much maligned Playbook tablet. Everyone thought they had figured out a way to make Android apps run natively. Instead, they had to run inside an emulator – a clunky, poor performing, and unfortunately buggy – emulator (and it totally tanked). Now with the release of BB10, Android apps can be installed OTA (over the air), but users have to find the application files (*.APK files) on their own. From what I understand, Microsoft would have to do much the same thing – run Android apps inside an emulator, and again, it may be Pokki – in order to get them to run on a Windows powered device.

I’m on the fence about this. I don’t like the idea of an Android app on a Windows powered device. I especially don’t like the idea of an Android app running on my Windows laptop or desktop. Android is a mobile OS, and as such, the apps aren’t as rich or full featured as those found on a traditional Windows laptop or desktop PC. I don’t think the end users are going to like what they get, or more importantly, what they don’t get, from the experience.

The reason why BB10 users can install Android apps OTA is because at its core, BB10 – or QNX – is just as Linux based as Android is. A GREAT deal of work would have to be done to Windows to be able to have Android apps run natively as they do on BB10. Unfortunately, you don’t see this feature creating a lot of BB10 device sales. In fact, you don’t see a lot of BB10 devices anywhere. I have yet to actually see one in the wild (and I am actively looking). Ultimately, I’m afraid that the same thing will happen with Windows.

If a user wants to run Android apps, a user is going to buy…an Android device. Period. They aren’t going to buy a BB10, or in this case, a Windows powered, device. Redmond isn’t going to create a draw or see a huge uptick in demand for Windows Phone or Surface RT/2 devices if it finds an acceptable way to run Android apps on them. It’s a nice to have. It’s something EXISTING users might find useful; but it’s not going to cause the masses to dump their iOS or native Android devices for a Windows powered device. It just won’t… History is replete with examples, too. If it wasn’t, the IBM PC clone market would have led to an Apple II clone market, a Commodore 64 clone market, etc. Blackberry also wouldn’t find themselves in their current situation, either. Users want to run native apps on native devices. They don’t want to use an emulator or have functionality limited.

All of this also goes against every bit of cultural norm I’ve ever seen come out of Redmond. However, as a devices and services company where the focus is now being placed on the software that powers both those devices and services, it’s clear that Microsoft has to do something. WHAT that is… I’m not certain yet; and I hope that they haven’t made their decision on it yet, either. Doing this would be a mistake; and it would really upset their development partners as well. Why would they want to develop for Windows Phone or in MetroUI/ModernUI if they can develop an Android app and hit both markets? I’m just sayin’…

However, it’s clear Microsoft has to do SOMETHING. They need to turn the tide around; and find a way to get more users on Windows powered devices. They need to find a way to get more mobile users. They need to find a way to stop people from using older, out-moded, outdated Microsoft operating systems and get them to adopt the most current version. They need a strategy that’s going to lead them into the future instead of milking profits from the past.

This is the biggest, root cause issue that Satya Nadella has before him. He’s going to need all the help he can get too, which is why I am glad that he has Gates around as an advisor. This is a sticky situation and they have a lot of work to do. They need to reengineer the company, their products and Microsoft’s identity. The faster they can do this, the better chance they will have at being successful.

In the meantime, the world is watching…. and waiting.

I’d really like to hear what YOU think about this whole Android on a Windows device thing. Is it a good idea? Will it inspire you to purchase a Windows device over an Android device, if they do it and do it right? I’d really appreciate you chiming in, in the comments below and giving me your opinion on the whole thing.

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Hitting the Emerging Market Sweet Spot

Apparently, Microsoft (Nokia, really) WILL be releasing an Android phone.

Microsoft and Android

If there’s one thing that I know well, its mobile devices. I’ve said many times, I cut my journalistic teeth on mobile devices and mobile computing. It’s probably the one thing that keeps me in the game.  There are so many different kinds of mobile gadgets and mobile convenience gadgets out there. It really doesn’t get old.

However, the US tends to be a high-end device market. Most people – even some of the poorer citizens of the US – would be considered filthy rich in many of the developing countries in the world.  As such, low-end smartphones and other low-end mobile electronics, don’t sell here very well.  In the rest of the world, however, that’s where the money is to be made.  Chasing after those emerging markets is where many of the larger smartphone manufacturers would like to put most of their attention.

Apple would like to seriously get involved in the developing/emerging smartphone market.  It’s been difficult for them, however, as their products are mostly high end, and manufacturing costs for older iPhones haven’t really decreased.  The iPhone 5c was rumored to be a lower costing iPhone for developing markets, though that didn’t turn out to be the case. The 5c was meant as a lower costing iPhone for the US. Sales of that device haven’t lived up to its initial expectations. Apple is still looking for a solution for their ecosystem in this lucrative market.

Microsoft also seems to be looking long and hard at the developing/ emerging smartphone market.  They have also hit a small snag.  Apparently, Windows Phone designs don’t lend themselves well to lower end handsets. As such, the current scuttlebutt has Microsoft’s Project Normandy moving forward.

For those that may not know, Project Normandy is an effort at Nokia for an Android based smartphone.  The device is said to be a low-end replacement for the S40 smartphone.  The device will run a version of Android with most of the branded, Google functionality removed. The device is also rumored to be heavily skinned and won’t have the standard and now easily recognizable Android navigation buttons.  The presumption is that the device would run both Microsoft and Nokia branded services like, Bing, the recently rebranded Office Online, and perhaps Nokia Here Maps.

It’s obvious from the description above, that the version of Android is likely forked. It’s also going to be heavily modified. However, this won’t be the first forked, heavily modified version of Android that the world has seen.  Amazon has done exactly that with its Kindle devices for a number of years.  According to ABI, 25% of all Android devices are shipped with a forked version of the popular mobile OS.  Perhaps Microsoft can do its best to make a Windows Phone like, tiled interface for Android and then phase it out. That way, they get a foot hold into the market, get everyone used to the interface and then give themselves the design, engineering and manufacturing time to get it all together.

It’s not known how well the Normandy device will fare, internally, at least. As Microsoft isn’t too interested in putting money in Google’s pocket’s.  As such, Project Normandy may not make it as far as Microsoft Kin phones did a few years ago.  However, Project Normandy represents a sizable investment on Nokia’s part and may help bridge the gap until Microsoft can engineer low-end devices that provide acceptable performance and features on the low-end handsets that are popular in emerging markets.  They need to do something…or else they’re going to miss the entire party…again.

However – and this is the sad part really – Nokia’s, and Microsoft’s past behavior and current company policy don’t have me thinking the device will have much time on the shelf. Nokia spent a lot of time and money developing Meego before it killed the OS shortly after releasing it on the N9.  Microsoft spent millions of dollars developing its Kin phones, which by many accounts were supposed to set its mobile efforts aright.  That effort totally tanked shortly after release. The devices themselves were really no more than toys, or so most of the mobile community thought when reviewing them.

So here we are… full circle again.  The developing/ emerging market sector is difficult to successfully get into.  Android was able to do it well because the OS can run on just about any mobile processor you can throw at it, and as such, manufacturing costs are LOW.  The OS supports skinning and can function well with and without Google services built in.  Heck… Amazon ripped out Google Play and its ENTIRE ecosystem and substituted its own.  And that essentially proves it – you CAN engineer Google out of Android and replace it with your own set of mobile services if you wish.

Given all of this, the ONLY chance that Normandy has of staying on a shelf long enough for Microsoft and Nokia to get a well-functioning, low end Windows Phone out there is none other than Microsoft’s new CEO, Satya Nadella.  If he is truly going to initiate a changing of the guard at Microsoft and have the company really concentrate on devices, service and the software that powers them, he has to push old company politics, motivations, desires, etc. to the side and insure that the device isn’t killed before it had a chance to make a serious difference.  Nadella is going to have to make certain that this stop gap is allowed to fulfill its lifecycle purposes and initiatives and gives both Microsoft and Nokia the opportunity to get its own device out there to take its place, without anyone trying to tank it from the inside.

What do you make of all of this?  Is this a good or a bad idea?  Would you like to see Project Normandy get off the ground?  Should Microsoft try to kill it?  I’d love to hear your thoughts in the discussion area, below.  Tell me what you think!

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Microsoft Down to Just 8 CEO Candidates

…and I don’t care if you DID print your resume on hot pink, triple bond paper…

2013-10-24_02-55-11-1_large_verge_medium_landscape

I’ve been calling for it for years, because despite the fact that Ballmer is a really nice guy, he just doesn’t get mobile computing; but Microsoft has been hard at work. Despite the fact that the talk has died down, Microsoft is still actively searching for a new CEO. In fact, they’re down to about eight candidates – 5 external and 3 internal.

Its kinda interesting, as many people – me included – thought this was a done deal a couple different times. However, MS did the right thing and took the spotlight off the activity and quietly whittled the list down to a few candidates.  They include the following people:

External Candidates Include:

  • Ford CEO Alan Mulally
    Microsoft needs a success story candidate, and that’s Mulally. Ford had been in need of an image and financial make over, and Mulally delivered. Ford’s stock has done well in the recent past and the work they’ve done related to automotive connectivity with Sync and major smartphone carriers shows that Mulally understands mobility; and that’s something that Microsoft needs.  Mulally is also one of Ballmer’s go-to advisors as I understand it, so he is at least familiar with what is going on with Microsoft, its challenges and problems. As much as I think other candidates might be a better fit, Mulally may actually be what Microsoft needs.
  • Nokia CEO Stephen Elop
    Elop left Microsoft to join Nokia.  Just a short while later, Microsoft acquired the smartphone business from Nokia, bringing Elop back to Redmond. Elop understands mobility and mobile computing; and Nokia’s been the flagship Windows Phone maker for a while now. On paper, Elop is the candidate that makes the most sense. However, other external candidates have firsthand experience in pulling a troubled company out of murky water before the swirl gets impossible to handle. I want to want Elop for this role, but the more that I think about it, Mulally makes the most sense.
  • Three other, unnamed external candidates
    Reuters, who is the source here, did not have any additional information on external candidates.  Your guess is as good as mine here.

Internal Candidates Include:

  • Former Skype CEO Tony Bates
    Skye is a mobile communications company and Bates did a great job in building Skype into a popular must have internet property that Microsoft swallowed up and now has as the backbone of its Communications platform. Anyone that can do that, certainly has enough vision to turn Microsoft around.
  • Cloud and Enterprise chief Satya Nadella
    Nadella brought us Azure and helped reinvent SkyDrive. His star has been on the rise at Microsoft for quite some time, and while there may not be as much known about him as Tony Bates, Stephen Elop or Alan Mulally, I think Satya Nadella is the leading internal candidate at Microsoft for the vacating CEO chair. He’s continually brought value to the company, his focus with cloud and enterprise at MS will be a key foundation point in any new mobility or mobile strategy, and there isn’t a lot known about him, meaning that the market and the industry won’t be distracted by any back story developments or questions that would develop now that he’s left (Ford or Nokia) one company or is back in the CEO chair.
  • One other, unnamed internal candidate
    Again, Reuters didn’t have any information on who the last internal candidate might be, and didn’t speculate at all. I, however, think it may be Julie Larson-Green.  She’s the new EVP of Microsoft’s Devices and Studio group and has been with the organization since 1993. She has history; and has drive and vision.  As the only (real) female candidate that I know or have heard of, I think she has a decent chance in the race.  Putting a woman in charge would be a popular and trending play for Microsoft, who desperately needs as much positive spin on their next public move as they can get.

Many people have speculated that Bill Gates would come back as CEO and pull Microsoft out of the gutter. I don’t see this happening and there’s no credible source that I can find that would suggest that Gates is making another run for the corner office on Microsoft’s executive floor.

Who do you think should sit in the captain’s chair at Microsoft? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the discussion, below.

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„All my friends got one” is sometimes a good reason to buy a specific phone

Last week, Apple released the new iPhone 5S and 5C. Android phones are released almost on a daily bases. With Microsoft now owning Nokia, we can probably expect new releases soon. And even Blackberry has some nice phones to offer. Never before was the choice of a phone so difficult. So what do we buy? And what are the reasons for our choice?

When outing ourselves that we want a new phone, we hear a lot of people around us telling us to get this one or that one for various reasons, some technical, some subjective and some just silly. And most of them will tell you not to get a particular phone, because “everybody got one”. But is this really such a bad thing?

We often want to display our individuality through the things we own and use but we tend to forget that we are social beings. Which means, in short, we have a need to communicate with each other and share things. Therefore, getting something because all your friends are getting or owning something may not be such a dumb reason after all.

What phone to get?

What phone you use often determines if you can play, communicate or interact with your friends or family. This is because different platforms make it harder to connect and interact. That is for different reasons, including the fact, that not all apps are cross-compatible and available.

Lets take the new iPhone, for example, with all the little features that make your life easier, like iMessage or the new Airdrop. If all your friends got Android phones, you won’t send many iMessages or exchange many files. The same applies for all the other platforms. Each has its own features but most are not cross-compatible. It is not about which is better then the other, it’s just which you can use most with your friends and family.

Not too long ago, “everyone has one” was a good reason for switching to or being on BBM. And that is why companies like Apple and Google are trying hard to keep the customers they already have.

I am not saying to go out and buy whatever your friends or family got. You should get whatever you like! But if you want to take full advantage of all that a certain platform or phone has to offer, you should take this criteria into consideration. There is no shame in doing or getting what your friends do or have. Basically, that’s what friends are for and that’s what defines us as a social being.

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Did Microsoft Just Buy a New CEO?

It seems awfully convenient that Microsoft has announced what could be HUGE, strategically acquisition over the Labor Day Holiday weekend…

It was announced over the weekend that Microsoft had acquired Nokia Devices division for roughly $7.2B USD.

nokia-microsoft

I’ll be honest – I really didn’t see this one coming – for a couple – three reasons:

  1. Microsoft had tried to acquire them before, and the transaction never happened. Nokia pushed back.
  2. Microsoft just announced a huge reorg. The amount of change created here is enough to keep Redmond busy, let alone having that combined with
  3. Steve Ballmer just announced his exit from Microsoft. The $900M write off was the straw that broke the camel’s back.

Just to clarify the timeline for everyone, because its critical to see what Redmond might be planning:

  • July 11: Microsoft announces a huge reorg.
  • July 18: Microsoft’s quarterly earnings are released, including a $900M write off for unsold Surface RT inventory.
  • August 23: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announces he will be retiring.
  • August 30: Investment fund, ValueAct joins the Microsoft Board.
  • September 3: Microsoft buys Nokia’s handset unit.

There are a couple items here that should be brought to mind, related to the items on this list. First, the reorg, once thought to be set in drying cement, is now up in the air. With Ballmer exiting, any new CEO may come in, assess the plans and make changes or throw them out entirely. Secondly, there were no layoffs with the reorg. Most people were simply shuffled around. That is also completely up in the air now.

Thirdly, Investment fund ValueAct has been pushing for Microsoft to be split up into consumer and enterprise based companies. That is also a distinct possibility, as the new CEO could make the case and have that happen. Bill is still the chairman of the board, but clearly, it’s all about the dollars at this point. Bill gets to do his philanthropy stuff because Microsoft makes him money. Without that, Bill really can’t give it ALL away. Economics does play a REAL part here.

Given all of this, I was REALLY surprised that both companies announced the acquisition. However, many people are speculating that Nokia’s CEO, Stephen Elop, who goes to Microsoft as part of the acquisition, is now the front runner in Microsoft’s search for Ballmer’s replacement. If this is the case, it makes sense. Quickly, here’s why:

  1. Elop knows and understands mobility. It’s clear from what’s happened with and to Microsoft in the past 13 years of Ballmer’s run as CEO that he couldn’t even really spell mobility let alone understand and lead the company in that direction. Microsoft missed the boat with WindowsCE and PocketPC, blew the opportunity to create a solid mobile name with Nokia as simply a smartphone partner, and doesn’t know how to create an ecosystem around Surface and Windows RT. The company’s future is uncertain due to its disjointed approach to mobility, CoIT and BYOD. The window for fixing this is closing fast, and if they want to turn things around, they need a leader who understands this sector and isn’t afraid to make bold decisions.
  2. Splitting the company may, or may not, be easier now. With Elop now on board, envisioning a separate mobility based division or company is easy to see. Perhaps the board wants to take enterprise and mobility and draw the line there, with the mobility business handling the consumer end. When you bring in the Nokia mobile division into the picture, it’s very easy to see things working this way.
  3. Nokia has been around for 150 years. They’ve sold everything from paper products to rubber boots and tires. The organization knows how to change businesses and focus, which is something that Microsoft clearly is having a huge problem with. Hopefully, Elop with bring at least this much of Nokia’s culture with him and instill that into the new organization.

I’m going to be watching this topic, and as more information comes to light, I’ll likely have a bit more to say. Why don’t you tell me what you think in the comments section, below?

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