Windows 8 still a bit glitchy

Microsoft released the Windows 8 Release Preview on, 31-May-12. I’ve pulled down the preview, with all of the Metro Apps and installed it…and then I promptly nuked my Asus Eee T101MT Touch netbook and restored Windows 7 to it.

Why?  Well, that’s pretty simple…

The OS couldn’t turn on the Wi-Fi Radio.

I have Comcast cable internet coming into the house providing me with a speedy 50Mbps down/20Mbps up pipe.  I’ve got 802.11g/n Wi-Fi in the house as well, and I know that when things are humming right and cooking with gas, I can push 22-25MB/s of data across my home network (That’s equivalent to 176-200Mpbs, kids…).  Oh yes… It’s a beautiful thing.

Soft32 will continue to provide in depth, thought provoking analysis on all major platform upgrades and advances, and the summer of 2012 looks to be a very active season.  There’s a lot happening in the desktop operating system world right now. So after downloading the 2.65GB ISO image of the 32bit version of Windows 8 Release Preview, with Apps last night, I set out to install the revised OS on my T101MT so that I could begin evaluating the delta (or change) between it and the Consumer Preview.

I plugged the Eee PC into one of the five wired Ethernet ports of the network switch I have in my home office and turned off the Wi-Fi radio. Over the years, I’ve learned that having more than one active network adapter running at the same time on a single PC (like having the Wi-Fi radio on and connected to your wireless router or access point while having a network cable plugged into your wired Ethernet port) can cause network performance issues on Windows PC’s.  After many conversations with Microsoft technicians and technical beta team leads, I’ve learned that a Windows PC can become confused when trying to determine which network adapter to send and receive IP traffic through if more than one networking adapter is active in the same PC at once.  So, I turned the Wi-Fi radio in the Eee PC off after plugging in the Ethernet cable. It seemed reasonable, logical, and it’s what my experience has taught me to do over the years.

Yeah…someone please remind me not to do that again…Big mistake.

After Windows 8 Release Preview installed and I unplugged the Ethernet cable from the netbooks LAN port, I couldn’t get the wireless radio to turn on to save my life.  I fiddled with every setting and registry nugget I could find. I pulled the driver out, deleted the files and let the PC find everything again to no avail.

After a couple hours, I threw in the towel and activated the recovery partition on the netbook. I blew the entire contents of the PC and will start over from scratch this weekend…this time, leaving the wireless network adapter on after plugging in the Ethernet cable.

Come back next time, and I’ll give you the run down on what actually happened, why it happened and what this means to the Windows computing public in general.

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Use TuneUp Utilities 2012 to get your PC running like it did the day you bought it

As many other computer users, I like to install all kind of programs from the Internet. First of all because it’s part of my job and second, for the sake of exploring what’s new out there in terms of software. However, this can mess up any PC quite shortly and there is always the speed issues over time as applications are installed and uninstalled. Actually – to be realistic – in time, any Windows PC become more sluggish and it’s performance degrade just by using it.

Now, to prevent this from happening, you can use a tool such as TuneUp Utilities 2012 that reduces clutter and ensures that all systems are running as they should. TuneUp Utilities has been around for quite a while and it’s clear that this software will stay on the market due to the simple fact that it does the job and it can really optimize your computer for the best performance – not just on paper. Well, considering that just a few days back, the new ‘2012 version’ has been officially released, let’s take a look at the new features.

First of all, there is TuneUp Economy Mode – a feature which prolongs the battery life on your laptop, netbook, and tablet PC and guarantees significantly improved battery life and power consumption. It extends battery run-time on notebooks, netbooks and tablet PCs running Windows by up to 30%, while also reducing energy consumption by up to 30%.

What’s behind the magic?

  • Reduced processor power consumption: TuneUp Economy Mode reduces your processors’ performance and optimizes their power consumption for maximum battery life and sufficient power for basic, everyday use.
  • Great power savings for your devices: TuneUp Economy Mode reduces the power consumption of many built-in and connected devices.
  • Turn off energy-sapping programs: TuneUp Economy Mode switches off unnecessary background processes that slow PC performance down.

Second, there is an improved TuneUp Program Deactivator – a feature which takes care of all those programs which run in the background whether they are used or not, slowing your computer down considerably for no good reason. The new Full Automatic Mode in TuneUp Program Deactivator eliminates these unnecessary slowdowns and makes sure your PC always operates at its peak performance. But relevant programs such as antivirus software or drivers will not be deactivated.

  • Start-Stop Mode automatically turns off selected programs when you don’t need them, speeding up your surfing, working, and gaming.
  • Optimized PC / Windows performance
  • Faster boot speeds, applications and gaming.

There is also also Turbo Mode, a feature which for example, enables you to shut down over 70 applications that bring your PC to a crawl with just a single click. In addition, proven maintenance features allow you to perform a full registry clean-up and much, much more.

TuneUp Utilities 2012 costs $49.95, but you can get a free trial for testing purposes prior to purchase from here.

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NAV7 PC Tablet is now available for pre-order

Netbook Navigator, a leading provider of mobile devices, today announced the launch of the NAV7 Slate PC. Powered by Windows® 7 and loaded with innovative best-in-class features, this cutting-edge new tablet redefines the concept of wireless PC mobility. Weighing just 1.25 lbs and equipped with a 1.6GHz Intel processor, up to 2GB RAM, 1.8” Solid State hard drive with up to 64GB of storage, 2 USB ports, front-side webcam, WIFI, Bluetooth and optional embedded 3G broadband, the NAV7 is essentially a full computer that can be carried with you practically anywhere.

The product is also loaded with a unique combination of features not seen before on a 7-inch tablet, including a back-side touchpad with mouse buttons, a swappable battery good for at least 4 hours per charge, and integrated accelerometer. In addition to the NAV7’s ultra-responsive 1024×600 capacitive LCD screen, the touchpad lets users experience the full Windows environment with the accurate precision and control of a mouse click, greatly enhancing productivity and providing an alternative method for PC application management and desktop navigation.

The NAV7 is now available for pre-order in limited quantities on first come, first serve basis with over 30 different configuration options starting from $649. Orders placed in March are expected to ship in May 2011.

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What kind of laptop is right for you?

In this guide, we’ll outline the different categories of laptops and which types are best for different users. We’ll also take a look at CPU, hard-drive, and networking options.

While there are many ways to divide the categories–based on weight, price, and components–the screen size is the primary deciding factor, as it’s the clearest physical difference between types of laptops.

UMPCs (or ultramobile PCs) are small handheld devices with screens that are between 5 and 7 inches, but they never really caught on. While the idea of a palm-size computer Dell d620 running Microsoft Windows and including most of the features you’d find on a full-size desktop or laptop was an engaging one, most of these devices were not exactly practical outside of a handful of specialized users.

Key features:
5- to 7-inch display
Nontraditional design

Netbook

Netbooks are either the most exciting thing to happen to mobile computing in years, (Acer aspire 4520 battery) or they are the downfall of an industry engaged in a painful price war race to the bottom. We generally define Netbooks as having 7- to 12-inch screens, a full keyboard, and an inexpensive, single-core low-voltage CPU.

While the earliest Netbooks had 7-inch screens and Intel Celeron processors, the typical Netbook today has a single-core Intel Atom CPU, 1GB of RAM, a 160GB hard drive, and runs either Windows XP or Windows 7.

Small and lightweight, they lack optical drives, have tiny keyboards and touch pads, and are generally underpowered for anything other than Web surfing, e-mailing, and basic office productivity. The payoff is that a typical Netbook can be had for less than $300, an unheard-of sum just a few years ago.

Key features:
9- to 12-inch display
No optical drive
Single-core low-voltage CPU, Intel Atom or comparable
Typically less than $500

Ultraportable

Before the rise of Netbooks, ultraportable systems were 11- and 12-inch laptops with then-expensive low-voltage CPUs, allowing them to be small and power efficient, but still relatively underpowered.

The popularity of Netbooks had threatened to make this category irrelevant–after all, who would pay $1,500 or more for an 11-inch laptop, when a $300 10-inch Netbook hp nx6100 battery (Hp dv9000) adapter was a reasonable substitute for basic Web and office tasks?

The ultraportable has been revived of late with the introduction of Intel’s new low-cost consumer ultralow-voltage CPUs. These chips are slightly more expensive and somewhat more powerful than the Netbook Intel Atom CPU, and are available in both single-core and dual-core versions.

Key features:
9- to 12-inch display
Low-voltage ULV CPU
No optical drive
Typically $600-$800

Thin-and-light

This somewhat unimaginative descriptor is intended for 13-inch laptops. Why do laptops with 13-inch displays deserve their own distinct category? It’s because they occupy a unique space in the industry. We define this by pointing out that a 13-inch laptop is the smallest size we’d be able to work on comfortably all day, and at the same time, the largest size we’d consider carrying around more than once or twice a week.

read the full article on: http://www.goodlaptopbattery.co.uk/battery-blog/

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