Why does the Performance on my iPhone Suck?

You’d be surprised by the answer (or at least you should have been)…

I’ve been an iPhone user on and off since 2008. I started with an iPhone 3G, which I ditched inside of three months because the bloody thing couldn’t take or make a call without dropping it at least – literally – a dozen times or more.

More recently, I’ve been dealing with a different iPhone problem. I’ve got iPhone 6’s and iPhone 7 Plus’ in my house. Since Apple’s whole “Batterygate” thing hit the news, things have been a bit crazy for nearly every iPhone owner I know of.

Case in point – I was recently contacted by a buddy of mine about this very issue. Apparently one of his wife’s friends was having an issue.

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I tried to explain to him that this was the publicized battery issue; and that there was a reasonably priced resolution, that shouldn’t be too difficult to take care of.

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It was clear to me that this was also the same problem that he had described in his previous message.

 

The additional information was nice, but not completely necessary…

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So, this, like other issues that plague iPhone users has been completely misunderstood. So let me break it down very carefully.

1. Do you have an iPhone 6/6 Plus, iPhone 6s/ 6s Plus, or iPhone 7/7 Plus?
If the answer is yes, then you need to take a look at the following questions.
2. Is the phone older than a year old?
If the answer is yes, ask yourself the next question
3. Does the phone seem slower now with iOS 11 than it did with iOS 10?
If so, you’re not crazy.

If the phone is a year old or more, AND you use your phone a LOT, you’ve likely cycled through the battery a number of times. The more cycles on your battery, the older it becomes. The older your battery is, the quicker it discharges power. When your phone has a lot of cycles on its battery, it’s very likely that it won’t hold a charge very long. When it doesn’t hold a charge for a long time, you end up charging it more often. This becomes a Catch 22; as the more that device needs to be charged, the shorter the drain time is, and the more cycles you put on your phone’s battery.

The performance problem isn’t imagined. Apple’s latest version of iOS 11.2.2 actually throttles the processor so that the phone uses less power, when the battery’s health (measured by age and the number of cycles it has on it) is below 80%-85%.

So the solution to all of this, believe it or not, is really easy – get a new battery. Prior to the issue with processor throttling in iOS 11.2.2, Apple charged $79 for a battery replacement. Now, Apple is charging $29 to replace the battery in your iPhone 6/6 Plus or later during all of 2018.

While the problem is now easy to identify, the solution is also easy to apply – slow phone? Get a new battery.

Do you have an older iPhone (now defined as at least 3 generation’s back (so at least 2 years old)? If you do, the best thing that you can do to put your phone back into “like new” performance, is to get a new battery.

You can find more information about this particular issue at Apple’s Support site.

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FEATURE REVIEW – Apple Watch – Part 4

Introduction

Wearables are a huge deal today. In fact, it’s one of the hottest growing computing categories on the market right now. Nearly every place you look and every person you actually look AT has some kind of wearable tech with them. Smartwatches and fitness bands seem to the easiest to spot, and nearly everyone at the office is wearing one, too.

Perhaps the biggest and most anticipated entry into the wearables/ smartwatch category is the Apple Watch. Is it the nirvana of wearables? Is it everything that its hyped up to be? Was it worth the wait? These are all GREAT questions.

The Apple Watch is a much anticipated, much sought after wearable. In part one, I took a look at the hardware specifically. In part two, I took a look at usability. In part three, I took a look at the Watch’s software, both on the Watch and on the iPhone.

In part four of this four part review, I’m gonna wrap it all up – given the way the Watch works, is it the right device for you? Is it worth the investment? Will it last, or is it just a flash in the pan?

Is the Apple Watch the device for you? Let’s get into how it does what it does and find out!

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Problems and Issues

Part 1 Conclusion Summary
The hardware is the thing!

You need to know what you’re buying, what options are available and how much the thing costs. Understanding what you have to work with before you get into what it does and how it does it can often help you figure out if there’s value in it for you.

The Watch is expensive. Apple branded watch bands are outrageously expensive… but man, some of them are really good looking.

Part 2 Conclusion Summary
Notifications need work.

Apple can do a lot here without reworking too much. They need to stop data coming over to the watch for notifications that are turned off, and they need provide a bit more control for the user.

Bluetooth connectivity is a bit of a challenge. The Bluetooth microphone needs help. Using either it or the speaker to make and place calls or listen to any kind of audio on the Watch is difficult. In “appropriate” locations, like an outdoor venue, the sound from the Watch is easily lost to background noise.

Part 3 Conclusion Summary

Big issues here were issues calculating and explaining the difference between active and resting calories. Most everyone is going to come from some other kind of fitness band exposure. Many of them, Fitbit and Microsoft Band included, don’t differentiate between the two. To them calories are calories. The Watch also isn’t as customizable as I had hoped. I’m hoping that WatchOS2.0 will bring more customization and software improvement with Apple Health and Activity on the iPhone as well as their counterparts on the Watch.

General Apple Watch Problems and Issues
Aside from other issues that I’ve listed so far – some of which are considerable – let’s face it… the biggest hurdle that Apple Watch has to get past is cost. The device appeals to nearly everyone with an iPhone. In fact, I don’t know anyone with an iPhone that doesn’t WANT an Apple Watch. However, the Watch itself is expensive, and the bands are simply outrageously priced. I have details on those, in the Hardware section of this review.

Skin Reactions to Rubber/ Silicone
I’ve been wearing the Apple Watch Sport for a little over three (3) months now. I have to say that I am very pleased with the way the Fluoroelastomer band has been wearing on my wrist. I have to this date had no adverse reaction to the band at all. Honestly, I’m really very surprised.

I had issues with the silicone band on the Fitbit Surge. In fact, I found myself removing it a few times to scratch and try to get rid of the dry, flakey skin, and to apply some kind of cream to it to help stop the itching. I haven’t had any issues like that with the Fluoroelastomer band on the Apple Watch; and honestly, I’m surprised. I actually expected to have problems because the Watch requires near constant skin contact to stay unlocked and working properly.

I’ve been wearing the Watch rather tight on my wrist with the Fluoroelastomer band in part because of the skin contact needs for locking and Apple Pay as well as heart monitor readings. I tend to like to wear my watches rather loose, more like a bracelet than anything else. However, I don’t have a metal band yet that really facilitates that style just yet. I also didn’t want to mess up any sensor readings during the extended review I’ve been working on.

Conclusion
First, let me say this – I love the Apple Watch. I use it every day. Now… let’s get down to brass tacks.

The Apple Watch is in no way an essential piece of hardware for anyone.

Period.

It’s a huge First World benefit; and that’s about it. It’s a great convenience provider, if you feel you’re in your iPhone too much; or would simply like to be in it a bit less, especially in meetings at the office. You’ll find that you definitely take your iPhone out to use it a great deal less than you used to… unless you’re a huge gamer, and then maybe not as much… but most people will find that they use their and check their iPhone less when they have the Watch. It’s great for managing iPhone notifications.

However, the Apple Watch is expensive. Everything about it is expensive. If you remember, I got the 42mm Space Gray Sport. It’s got a anodized aluminum case and a black Fluoroelastomer band; and it was still over $470 with tax. That’s the ENTRY level Watch in the 42mm size. You can buy a Mac Mini for about as much…

Let me be very clear – I love the Apple Watch. However, its WAY overpriced.

The Branded band options aren’t all that great. While they’re interchangeable, those are ALSO grossly overpriced. Fifty ($50) bucks for a rubber watch band is totally outrageous. … And don’t even get me started on the Link Bracelet. NO watch band, no matter how well designed or how good looking or comfortable to wear is worth $500 bucks on its own, especially one made of stainless steel. The market segment that that band is targeted to will pay that much, but I honestly think they can’t afford to, in all reality. The 42mm Apple Watch (not the Sport or Edition… this is the stainless steel version in either black or silver) with the Link Bracelet is $1100… and that’s before tax!

If you’re looking for additional bands and don’t want to spend a lot, check out Click, a Watch band adapter designed specifically for Apple Watch. With these, you can use any 22mm band you can find, and they’re totally interchangeable with other bands, so you’re not stuck with anything.

The Apple Watch handles notifications very, VERY well, but if you remember my Fitbit Surge review, I totally lambasted the device for sending over information from my iPhone to the device, even when the notifications are turned off. While its slightly different here, the same rule applies to the Apple Watch.

Off is off, guys; but unfortunately, while you can modify individual notifications, you can’t turn them off. What’s up with that?! You’re trying to tell me that after paying $17,000 for a Watch (it has the same hardware components as the Sport, just a different case, you can’t turn off the notifications you don’t want to receive and stop the data from being sent to the device? That seems a bit odd, don’t you think?

Here’s something interesting to think about – From a functionality perspective, the Microsoft Band does nearly EVERYTHING that the Apple Watch does… nearly EVERYTHING (except payments and the cutesy stuff…) and its nearly $300 cheaper compared to the Apple Watch Sport. If you’re looking for a fitness band that’s also a smartwatch but don’t have the dollars for an Apple Watch, Microsoft Band might be the way to go.

If however, you’ve got your mind and heart set on an Apple Watch, you’re going to need to make certain you understand what you’re buying and the associated costs with it. It’s a great tool, but due to cost and the limitations of WatchOS 1.x, you may find that you might want to wait until WatchOS 2.0 is released, until the cost comes down or until new hardware is released.

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Convert videos for your Mac or favorite iDevice with MacX Video Converter Pro

Convert videos for your Mac or favorite iDevice with MacX Video Converter Pro

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One of the greatest things about modern computing is that the tools to create, transport and convert video – the kind that are of the quality that used to be available only to professionals – are now available to just about everyone. This is largely due to the fact that most of the hardware that common computer users now have access to, is professional grade. With that being the case, tools like MacX Video Converter Pro are a huge asset, as it provides professional processing with consumer level ease of use.

MacX Video Converter Pro is a general purpose Mac video converter that can convert video to any format. It supports MP4, H.264, MPEG, AVI, FLV, MOV, WMV, MP3, AAC, among others. It can also transfer supported HD video formats (AVCHD, M2TS, MKV) with flawless video quality. The app will also download YouTube videos. It will also record your screen, edit videos and allow you to make photo slideshows

The app supports a wide variety of formats and devices. You can convert video to and from iPhone 6/6 Plus, iPad Air 2/Air, iPad Mini 3/Mini with Retina, and Apple TV 3. The app supports files from iTunes and iMovie; and it will also support conversions to and from the HTC Desire 816, Galaxy S5 mini/S5, Galaxy Note 4/Edge, Galaxy Tab S, Amazon Kindle Fire HDX8.9, Google new Nexus 7, Surface Pro 3 as well as the Xperia Z1/ Z2/ Z3, and PS4.

MacX video Converter Pro is a decent desktop converter. Its interface is a bit disappointing to be honest, but its more than made of by the file formats and the the mobile devices it supports. The app works well with consumer based hardware, but is even better with high end hardware. The price is a bit on the high side for today’s desktop app market, but its performance is top notch. If you’re looking for a decent app that will not only download and convert YouTube video, but will also convert video to and from most of the popular mobile devices and video formats, you really will have a hard time finding a better app.

 

Download

 

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A Month or More with the iPhone 6

I’ve had the iPhone 6 since its original ship date back in September 2014. Let’s take a look at how things have gone so far…

Introduction

The release of the iPhone 6 is probably the biggest iDevice release in Apple’s history aside from the releases of both the original iPhone in 2007 and the original iPad in 2010. The iPhone 6 and its bigger cousin the iPhone 6 Plus are both evolutionary and revolutionary in the smartphone and phablet categories as they have brought both their 4.7″ and 5.5″ form factor sizes into the main stream, in my opinion. Before the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, smartphones around 5″ or larger were exclusively an Android thing… and something that Apple enthusiasts could only dream about.

No… I’m not saying that Apple defined, redefined or was the first one to the market with these larger phablet sized devices. That honor is definitely in the Android side of the world; and I think HTC or Samsung was the first to this party back in like 2008 or so. There was an Android device on the Sprint network (I forget the device name); but at the time, everyone thought it was WAY too big.

Now with the iPhone in the larger screen category, everyone is interested in how the phone looks, works and functions with a larger display, as well as with some of its newer functionality and hardware. I’ve had an iPhone 6 since the day it was originally released to the public in late September of 2014. I did an unboxing the day it arrived, and you can watch it on my site, iTechGear at your convenience. However, let’s take a look at the iPhone 6 as it compares to the iPhone 5/5s and a couple of other phones in my current device stable and see how it stacks up again not only the competition, but past iterations of itself.

Form Factor & Display

Next to the conclusion in this article, I’ve chosen to write this section last. I’m telling you this because, well… you’d think that with the size of the device and its display being one of the bigger differentiators with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6+ that I’d be rushing to talk about the device’s form factor and display.

No… not really; and there are a few, specific reasons as to why…

Device Size

First and foremost, I didn’t want the entire world to think that I’m too much of a fanboi. Yes… I *AM* a full Windows to Mac convert at home. I really DO prefer OS X to Windows for what I do at home, for me… which amounts to mostly multimedia consumption (audio and video) via iTunes as well as digital photography (at least, once you get past all of the writing and such…)

Secondly, the change in device size is perhaps the most noticeable thing about the device. Once people see that you’re running iOS on your smartphone, AND they see the size of the device, they almost always ask you

  1. If you’re using the iPhone 6 or 6+ (without the context of the OTHER device, most people are surprised at how big either device really is. It’s not until you have both new iDevices side by side that you realize just how big they are.)
  2. If they can compare the size of my device to the size of theirs

In the case of the iPhone 4/4s or iPhone 5/5s, both the iPhone 6 and 6+ are dramatically and noticeably bigger. The iPhone 6 makes the iPhone 4/4s look like a growth stunted, pigmy of a device. It’s clearly much larger, and as such, the device loses its classic and Apple-touted one handed usability, that is, unless you’re someone with hands like LeBron James. I don’t think he – or people of similar size and stature – would have trouble stretching their hands to any corner of the device. However, in most cases, having a 4.7″ or 5.5″ diagonal screen means that you’re going to need both hands to operate it in most settings and occasions. However, Apple has tried to compensate for that somewhat, and has included a double-tap action for the Touch-ID sensor that will bring the top of the screen down to the middle of the display, making it easier to get to items at the top.

I will say that I love the new size of the screen. It’s much nicer to have a larger screen, though I wouldn’t like to go (much) bigger than the 4.7″ of the iPhone 6. I have also got an HTC One (M8), and that has a 5.0″ display. You can see the difference in the extra 0.3″; but I don’t want to get any bigger than that.

The iPhone 6+, for example, is just too big for me. The extra 0.8″ larger display than the iPhone 6 and half inch (0.5″) larger display than the HTC One (M8) is just TOO big for me. I honestly wanted the iPhone 6+ after seeing the announcing keynote during WWDC; but after I put my hands on it in an AT&T Store…

Yeah, no. It’s just too big for me. It’s like holding a mini iPad Mini up to your head, and I don’t know that I’d be able to do that without a tin foil hat or something… (too much radiation from too large of a device).

So for me, the size is just right.

Device Profile

Oh my goodness the device is THIN!

In fact, it’s almost too thin. The iPhone 6 is 6.9mm thick. The iPhone 6+ is 7.1mm thick. Compared to the iPhone 5/5s at 7.6mm, you can really see and feel that the iPhone has “lost weight” and has a much thinner profile than before.

The biggest problem I have is not necessarily “bend gate.” I know that the device isn’t going to bend in my pocket. It’s just that I’m afraid that it will. I know… it’s completely irrational once you get beyond the conspiracy theory. So, I’ve got my iPhone 6 is a huge, ugly Otterbox Defender Series case. It’s nice, but it really more than doubles the thickness of the device. I like this case. It does a good job of protecting the device; but its ugly as sin, and really makes the device almost too big in and of itself. I’m looking for a thinner profile case that offers some decent protection, but I haven’t found one that doesn’t cost more than the $50 USD that I paid for the Otterbox Defender I got on iPhone 6 Day.

I love the profile of the iPhone 6. I truly do, but I’m afraid that I’m going to drop it; and that if I do, that I will break or fracture the screen without the right case around it.

Yes… it may be irrational, but have you seen photos of the device or have seen one up close? It’s totally beautiful. Speaking of pictures, I have the full 360, below.

Device Photos – The Full 360˚

Here, you’re going to see my iPhone 6 beside an iPhone 5, the HTC One (M8) (an Android 4.4.x device) and the iPhone 5.

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iPhone 6 First Impressions

I’ve had the iPhone 6 for a few days and here are my initial thoughts on the device

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It happens every year since 2007. The world goes bat-stuff crazy when Apple announces and then releases a new iPhone or iDevice. Everyone that has the old one WANTS to get the new one. Not everyone that wants one can either afford to buy one or those that are, are lucky enough to get one on the actual launch day. This year, I was blessed enough to be both.

I’ve been playing with a space gray, iPhone 6 since the evening of 2014-09-19. I completed an unboxing for Soft32 that you can see on my site, iTechGear.org.

After working with the device for about five or so days, I have the following to share about the device.

Size and Form Factor

The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus is perhaps one of the thinnest smartphones I have ever put my hands on. While the 4.7″ screen size is perhaps the biggest – and most noticeable – of Apple’s new smartphone’s features, the device’s waist size is relevant news, especially after report after report of the device bending.

With the new design, the iPhone has departed from its four version, design stagnation (iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, iPhone 5, iPhone 5s). The iPhone 6/6 Plus is new. Its sexy. Its bigger, and its thinner. It provides the user with a whole new smartphone experience; or at least that is what Apple would have you believe; and its probably true.

In hand, either device is huge. While the 6 Plus is like holding an iPad mini to your head, the iPhone 6, while only slightly smaller, is still vastly larger than its predecessors. Over the past few days, I’ve found that holding the device is noticeable, especially after using the iPhone 5 over the past two years. However, its noticeably larger, and you know that you know that you’re using a much larger device.

The device is super sexy; but I wouldn’t use it without a case. I made this decision BEFORE hearing about all of the device bending stories and before seeing all of the pictures. As such, the day that I got my iPhone 6, I went to AT&T and bought an OtterBox Defender Series Case for my iPhone 6. I love the profile of the iPhone 6, but if smartphones get any thinner, they will definitely need to be able to bend or fold on purpose in order to prevent the device from being damaged.

You won’t want it to be in a case, but you’re GOING to need something to help protect the device. Its really a GREAT looking device; but while Apple has done a really great job of designing a technologically advanced, consumer friendly device, it may have gone too far in thinning it out.

The screen seems great, and iOS 8 provides a way to change the display resolution on the device to provide those with failing eyesight – like me – a way of changing the zoom level so that its easier to read. The setting is available on both the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

So far, I like the size change. The older form factor seems tiny by comparison. Thankfully, the larger device still fits in my Arkon Car Mount, allowing me to use the device with my hands free kit in my car.

I’ll have more on the device size and my use of it in my full review of the iPhone 6.

Battery

Over the past few days, there have been a number of reports on issues with battery life. I have on occasion experienced some of this. While the battery in the iPhone 6 is definitely bigger – you can tell its got a longer battery life – its clear that in some instances, it should last longer than it does.

Like many others, I connect my iPhone to my Pebble Steel, my car radio, my Nike Fuel Band, my Bluetooth headset, and of course, my MacBook Pro, among other devices. While many of these may be BT-LE compatible, and therefore don’t suck too much power, some of them aren’t. Interestingly enough, I don’t see Bluetooth being among the guilty parties in some of the power drains I’ve seen.

As with the iPhone 5 and earlier, most of the drain I’m seeing is coming from screen and processor/co-processor use. Yes. You can read that as gaming. Its also one of the biggest reasons why I really don’t do a lot of gaming on my iPhones. At the end of the day – literally…the end of the day – it doesn’t pay off.

On my iPhone 5, I could start the day with a full charge and after one session of Angry Birds Friends, where I went through all 6 levels for the week – perhaps, 30 minutes of play – my battery life would be down below 70%. I’m seeing similar performance with my iPhone 6.

Some games just suck battery life. You’re going to need to govern your game play and figure out which games are the biggest culprits. I’ll have more on battery life with my review.

iOS 8

I’ve written a lot on iOS 8 over the past few months. You can see my coverage on Soft32 over the past few months, here, here, here and here. The beta period wasn’t pretty. While the OS itself is showing some stability, the release of iOS 8.0.1, has been just as big a train wreck as the other pre-releases of the new mobile OS. Apple, like so many others, is cutting corners on quality; and when you have something like this, being this big, and this visible, you simply just can’t.

Releases of any mobile operating system need to be clean and as issue free as possible. As a software quality professional with over 25 years in quality, I can tell you that there will always be bugs. Always. You’re not going to get away from them. However, you need to make sure that the bugs that you are releasing with are known, of lower priority and severity, and that fixes are planned and coming. Releasing an update to your mobile operating system that disables all mobile, cellular communications and kills the device’s biometric security measures is certain evidence that your QA director isn’t watching where the ship is going. Defects of that severity and priority were easy to spot and should have prevented the release of the update.

I’ll have more on the device, including comparative photos of the iPhone 6 up against the iPhone 5, the HTC One (M8) and Lumia 520 that I have. If you have any specific questions on the device or on iOS 8, I’d be happy to address them in my review. Please feel free to leave your questions in the comments section, below.

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Apple Updates: Yosemite Developer Preview 8/ Public Beta 3

os-x-yosemiteI’m not going to go into too much detail here. I’ve covered this quite a bit so far. Suffice it to say, that while the OS in and of itself seems much more stable than it has in the past, I’m having issues again with Bluetooth and my new, iPhone 6, as I mentioned earlier.

Continuity is still cool, and most of it works well. However, it needs some work. This is something that really needs to get addressed and addressed well before the release of OS X 10.10 Yosemite. The whole thing with the integration between the desktop and the mobile only works if the connection between the two platforms is solid. Right now, its not. Apple still has work to do.

Conclusion
I’m going to make this short too. Everything that Apple has shown us in the past few days should be considered a work in progress. While the hardware for iPhone 6/6+ is finalized, things like Apple Pay have not been implemented yet and won’t be for a month or more as of this writing. There will likely be some software revisions that need to take place in order to enable all of the hardware functionality that is currently dormant and not used. Which brings us to iOS 8…

iOS 8, though also released, is definitely a work in progress. With everything that I have seen of it so far, it definitely feels as though the finishing touches on it were rushed. As apparently, was its latest update.

While finishing the conclusion section of this article, iOS 8.0.1 was released to help introduce support for HealthKit apps, provide Photo Library fixes, as well as fixes for third party keyboards, Reachability, etc. However it has some SERIOUS issues.

First and foremost among those include breaking cellular connectivity (your iDevice can’t connect to a cellular network, which makes your iPhone effectively…a door stop), and the inability for TouchID sensors in the 5s, 6 and 6 Plus to recognize or setup any new finger prints.

USERS ARE ADVISED TO NOT INSTALL iOS 8.0.1 until these issues can be addressed.

If you’re using OS X Yosemite, the OS is very usable. Its stable enough for daily use at this point, but if you’re looking for the finer points such as Continuity and Handoff to work as designed, you should understand that these also need work.

I’m in the process of working on my iPhone 6 review and I will have a first impressions document published in the coming days. Please stay tuned to Soft32 for all the updates!

go to Apple Updates : IOS 8 GM

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Apple Updates : IOS 8 GM

While I have been writing this, Apple released iOS 8 to the general public. iOS 8 is a huge update and contains a number of new and notable features. Please note, that if you want the full benefit of all of these, you’ll need to be using a Mac. For example, you aren’t going to get Continuity and Handoff to work on a Windows machine. Its just not going to happen. However, without much further ado, here’s the skinny on iOS 8.

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Photos – New and Improved
One of the biggest things that people do with their smartphones is take photos. Its probably the thing that is universally done the most by every smartphone owner on ever mobile platform. This is one of the biggest reasons why Nokia created the 42MP smartphone – not that it did them or Windows Phone any good – but it’s THE reason why they did it.

With the iPhone and iOS 8, this is no exception. To that end, Apple has made some huge improvements in the camera and photo app department. Its now easier than ever to search your photo library. You can search by date taken, location or album name. Searching is made easier by smart suggestions. All you have to do is tap the search icon. IOS 8 will provide you search choices that are important to you. An additional tap will show you photos taken near your current location (provided you have location data saved as part of your photo’s metadata), taken at the same time next year or your all time favorites.

On board editing tools have also been improved. You don’t have to wait to get back to your Mac or your PC to retouch the photos on your iDevice. You can edit the composition of your photos. You do straighten the horizon, crop, modify the exposure, as well as adjust brightness, contrast, highlights black point /white balance, etc. It’s a dark room in the palm of your hands…or at least that’s what Apple says. Photos in iOS 8 also has a number of different filters that can take any of your shots and give you the opportunity to apply classic filters – black and white, high contrast, tonal, fade, etc. – with just a couple taps. App developers can also make their filters and editing tools available to iOS Photos, so you get access to their tools without having to exit one app and then open another.

The biggest news in Camera and Photos is Camera’s new Time-lapse Video Mode. IOS 8 does all the work, snapping photos dynamically at preset intervals. The result is a video showing an accelerated sequence over time. All you have to do is find a subject, swipe to setup the time-lapse mode, and then tap the record button. Camera does the rest.
Messages – Communicate with EVERYONE
Messages has matured a lot with iOS 8, too. It used to be that iMessage – Apple’s ToIP (text over IP) service only worked with other iDevices. Now, iMessage works with all devices with all mobile platforms. You can send and receive messages from your iDevice to any internet connected device. Those devices that aren’t an iDevice will now send messages via SMS.

Over and above this, Messages will also let you send and receive audio clips as part of your SMS or iMessage. All you need to do is touch and hold your thumb to record an audio message and then simply swipe to send it. Its really, just that easy. Now you can send pictures of your little ones as well as a recorded sound bite of their first words. Its kinda cool.

On the other end of it all, its easy to receive and listen to. All you have to do is lift the device to your ear to listen like it’s a phone call. You can also tap the play button on your screen. You can pass sound bites back and forth that easily.

If video is more to your liking, you can just as easily send a quick video. The bottom line is that multimedia messaging services (MMS) are now not only limited to just still pictures. You can truly send and receive audio, video as well as stills. Your iDevice just found a whole new level of cool, even if that level of cool – at the very, very least – gives you access to every other piece of multimedia that the device processes.

There are a few other new features in Messages that you might find cool. The last one that I want to mention is the ability to manage group messages a bit more. It used to be that once included in a group message you were in the conversation forever. Now, you can bow out when ever you want to . You can also manage location data in the group conversation.
UI Enhancements
iOS 7 introduced a whole new redesign to Apple’s mobile operating system. It wasn’t necessarily received very well; but after about a year or so, the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune have lessened. The world seems to be getting over it.

With the release of iOS 8, Apple is building on the design elements that it introduced in iOS 7. The experience now is stronger, sturdier, and much more natural than it was in iOS 7.
Interactive Notifications
iOS 8 has interactive notifications that you can interact with from Mail, Calendar, Reminders and Messages; and you can do all of that directly from the banner notification without leaving the app you’re in. You can stay working in your app, and still answer your text or accept an invitation without leaving your game or your photo app.
Mail Enhancements
There are enhancements with Mail as well. You can easily pop between drafts and your inbox, just like a desktop mail client. If you’re looking to quickly add information to your phone, Mail gives you the ability to do so right from a note you’ve received.
Reading List Enhancements
With Safari, you get more of what you have on the desktop. On iPad, you get all of your sties in one spot. Tab View shows you all the open tabs on your iPad as well as tabs you have open on your other iDevices. Your bookmarks and your favorites from your Reading List are always just a tap away.
People Shortcuts
The best are saved for last. The iOS task manager has a new feature. The double tap not only brings up running apps, but will also bring up a row of contact names and faces that give you quick access to communication methods for those people. Its actually pretty cool. iOS gives you access to not only recent contacts, but a couple recent favorites as well.

There are a couple of cool features outside of the UI enhancements that provide a great deal of value; but its really the UI enhancements that drive most of the value here.
Contextual Keyboard
Having a contextual keyboard has been an area missing from iOS for a long time. Having a keyboard that can use predictive text is a huge help on a mobile device whether it’s a smartphone or a tablet. Now you can write sentences with just a few taps.

The keyboard can learn you messaging style and after time, offer suggested words that make contextual sense as you type. This works in Messages and Mail. It can also learn your audience, offering contextually appropriate choices based on the person you’re emailing or chatting with via text. It will also anticipate answers to questions and provide appropriate answers beyond the simple “yes” or “no.”

The coolest thing is that predictive text works with languages besides English. So far, it works with US, UK, Canadian and Australian English as well as French, German, Italian, (Brazilian) Portuguese, Spanish and Thai. It is also functional in both Simplified and Traditional Chinese as well as Japanese Kanji.

Third party keyboards are now also supported, meaning that you can now Swipe rather than type. iOS and keyboard developers can now start working together, things like Swipe are truly now, just a glide away.

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Apple Updates: iPhone 6

There’s a great deal going on in the Apple world. Let’s take a quick look…

Introduction

To say that there’s been a bit of activity in Cupertino as of late would be an understatement. Apple’s been very busy over the past few weeks. They have released the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. They have (or will shortly, as of this writing) released iOS 8 not only in GM form to their development team, but to the general public; and they have released Yosemite DP8/Public Beta 3.

As you can see from the screen shot below, I’ve got iPhone 6’s on the way to my house. They should arrive on Friday 2014-09-19 by 3pm Central Time. This is the first time since I purchased an iPhone 3G that I have been able to get an iPhone ON an actual iPhone release day. I will have everything officially unboxed, videoed and posted for all to see, followed by a full iPhone 6 review WITH comparative screen shots in the days immediately following the arrival of the device.

In the mean time, let’s take a few moments and look at all of these huge releases one by one.

IPhone 6

iphone6concept4

The iPhone 6 is 138.1×6.70×6.90mm (LXWXH) and weighs 129 grams. It comes in 16G, 64G and 128G capacities; and is priced at $199, $299 and $399, respectively (all prices are USD). The differences between the two new models are mostly about the display sizes and the camera. The Plus has optical image stabilization due to the larger size of the device. The iPhone 6 does not. The iPhone Plus will display full HD. The iPhone 6 will display up to 720p.

Both models have an 8MP iSight camera, a 1.2MP FaceTime camera with a five-element, f/2.2 aperture lens with a sapphire crystal cover and True Tone flash. They also have the A8 processor and M8 motion coprocessor. They also both have TouchID fingerprint sensors and both support Apple Pay.

As I mentioned, I’ve got 3 devices with three FedEx tracking numbers on their way to my home even as I write this. I will have more updates on the iPhone 6 after they arrive and I have posted the live unboxing I plan on doing of my brand new, space gray, iPhone 6 Friday afternoon 2014-09-19.

go to Apple Updates : IOS 8 GM

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