Facebook is Killing Me

This whole, “splitting-off-FB-Messenger-into-a-different-app-thing” is making be bang my head against a wall. Here’s why…

facebook-messenger-transparent-300x300It started with Apple, I think.  I think… and it was in early 2012 with the release of Messages Beta.  I published an article on InformationWeek about two years ago that covered this.  I also wrote a feature length review of Messages, which was new at the time.

While others may disagree and provide other info and stats, (and I welcome that in the Discussion area, below…) sending text messages via IP instead of GSM/CDMA has started a huge in-flux of messaging and texting apps to hit the market.  Now, Facebook is tossing their hat into the ring with Facebook Messenger.

Facebook has somewhere in the neighborhood of, like, one billion users. If each and every one of them send just one message a day, to just one of their friends, that’s one billion messages exchanged via their social network each and every day. That’s seven billion a week and 30.44 billion each month.

That’s a lot of messages (and only if each user sends just one message a day).

Facebook has been saying for months that it would be breaking the messaging function out of its mobile app and would be moving it to a separate app all together.  I find this very painful.  I’m a bit of a purist when it comes to my mobile experience.  The last thing I want on my phone is yet ANOTHER mobile messaging app.

I’ve been reviewing software for Windows, Mac, Pocket PC/ Windows Mobile, Windows Phone, Android and iOS for almost 20 years. I’m a software QA manager/ director and I can tell you with 100% accuracy – there’s a great deal of crappy software on the market.  Installing and uninstalling apps on to my mobile phone – a mission critical, communications tool for me – isn’t something I really like to do.  It tends to clutter up your device and trashes its performance, stability; and in many cases requires a wipe and reconfigure when its performance tanks and it acts buggy.    The LAST thing I want to have to do in order to keep current functionality, is install two apps to provide the current functionality I have in just one.

However, that’s what Facebook is doing.

In a recent note to its customers, Facebook states, “We wanted to let you know that messages are moving out of the Facebook app to our Messenger app, a free app that’s faster and more reliable for everyday messaging…. Soon, we’ll start guiding you to get started with Messenger. After a few days, you’ll also see a reminder notice in the Facebook app, where you’d normally see your messages. At that point, we’ll ask you to install Messenger or go to the Facebook website to view and send messages. You’ll still see new message notifications in the Facebook app, and it’ll be easy to switch between Facebook and Messenger.”

In short, if you do any PM-ing in Facebook on a regular basis, you’ll have to start using FB Messenger if you want to PM someone from your mobile device, from within Facebook. Facebook states that the swap to their Messaging app from the Facebook mobile app should be seamless, or nearly seamless. These changes won’t affect functionality experienced on the FB website on any platform or in any browser.

I’m not certain how Facebook monetizes all those messages people send and receive; but you have to think that there must be some financial angle for them to pursue this.  Perhaps they’re planning on implementing an ad supported app. I’m not certain… Any way you cut this, though, it’s another messaging app that I HAVE to install (if I wish to trade or view PM’s sent to me while I am using the Facebook mobile app). I hate that. I’ve got enough junk on my phone as it is with Angry Birds and Candy Crush… I don’t want to have to install another app, despite the messaging experience it’s supposed to provide.

Do you communicate via Facebook messaging with your friends a lot?  Will you continue to do so on your mobile device after Facebook removes its messaging functionality from its mobile app?  Will you install Facebook Messenger on your mobile phone and use it, or is it something that you’re just going to HAVE to install to keep all your current functionality?  I’d love to hear your thoughts on this in the discussion area, below. This is just killing me.  I hate installing separate apps for this stuff.  How about you?

Related Posts:

Communicate with all of your friends and contacts via IM or video with QQ International

QQ InternationalChina has long been one of the biggest, untapped internet markets on the planet. If you have friends or family in China, then you’re going to want to take a long hard look at QQ International. Its an IM app for Windows, and it is very popular there.

QQ international has been serving hundreds of millions of Chinese users since 1998. In China, QQ is THE go-to app for instant messaging, because of its predominant market share.

QQI-01QQ International is the missing link between China’s largest online network and the non-Chinese speakers who live in China or have an interest in the country.

In addition to connecting with people you already know, QQ International is a great place to meet and make contact with people who share a similar interests in China, from all over the world. Might it be for business, dating, lifestyle or travel, you will easily find active interest groups and start making new friends or exchanging ideas right away.

QQ International is the best way to communicate with friends and loved ones who either have an interest in China or who actually live there. The app comes with multiple language interfaces, including English, so you’ll be able to use the app no matter what language you speak. In the States, IM apps aren’t very big, but in China, they most certainly are, and QQ is one of the best.

If you’ve used ICQ, then you’ll find QQ very familiar and easy to use. Its very similar in look, feel and function.

download QQ International

 

 

Related Posts:

Communications capabilities with Zello

Zello-Walkie-Talkie-IconGet push to talk styled communications capabilities with mobile device and PC users in this cool Windows app.

Communication is  the key to productivity. I’ve heard it said millions of times.  In many cases, instant communication can be a God-send.  This is the biggest reason why push-to-talk (PTT) is such a critical and effective communications tool; and the biggest reason why I like Zello. It’s a PTT app for your Windows PC.

Z-02Zello is a free push-to-talk application for smartphones and PCs. It’s lightweight, easy to use and extremely fast. It’s also free for personal use; and can be used on any combination of Android, Blackberry, iOS and PC’s.

One of the best things about Zello conversations is that they’re are almost as fast as face-to-face conversations.  They are also faster than online communications.  All you have to do is click to talk. There really isn’t any need for any kind of real configuration.

Zello supports channels where you can talk to up to 100 people from anywhere in the world at the same time.  You can record your conversations and re-play them whenever you want.

Zello is lightweight. The program uses very little system resources and memory.  Zello doesn’t require you to use a headset. You can use your phone’s speakerphone, a plugged in or built-in microphone or connected speakers, for example.  Zello works great over Wi-Fi and 3G.  It will also work over GPRS and EDGE, but its performance isn’t as robust at those slower speeds.

Related Posts:

Chat with your friends with RaidCall

Chat with your friends with this group-based audio chat software for Windows.

raidcallVoIP is a huge deal. Making calls to friends and loved ones across the internet is easier than ever to do today.  This is one reason why I like apps like RaidCall, It’s an audio chat client for Windows.

RaidCall is free and light weight.  Setting it up is very easy.  With it, you won’t have to rent or set up local chat servers. Its low CPU usage and minimum memory footprint also allow for smooth, uninterrupted communication between you and your call recipients.

RaidCall supports Group Communications, too.  You can have up to 10,000 users at a time in a single RaidCall group and has a flexible group management system.  The client supports Hi-Fi quality voice chat from anywhere in the world; and has additional features like a voice recorder, polling, announcements, and an activity log.

RaidCall also supports instant messaging.  Aside from passing text messages back and forth, the app also handles file transferring and screenshot sharing, and chat records. It also supports personalized themes and emoticons.

RC-01

RaidCall is a decent VoIP client, but is seriously lacking in video calling support. With apps like Skype and FaceTime readily available (depending on platform) that support both audio as well as video chat, for many, RaidCall may be a non-starter in the consumer market.

For SOHO, it may be a decent choice, as video chat may not be a huge need here.  However, the lack of video chat support in a client like this is a huge hole.  Even though it’s free, there are other aps out there that are likely a better choice.

download RaidCall

Related Posts:

Social networking creates big vulnerabilities

After an eight-month study, Palo Alto Networks (an enterprise security and firewall company) released a report that provides a global view into application usage by assessing 28 exabytes of application traffic from 1,253 enterprises between October 2010 and April 2011.

More than 40% of the 1,042 applications that Palo Alto Networks identified on enterprise networks can now use SSL or hop ports to increase their availability within corporate networks. This segment of applications will continue to grow as more applications follow Twitter, Facebook, and Gmail, who all have enabled SSL either as a standard setting or as a user-selectable option in an effort to create the perception of improved security for its end-users.

Contrary to popular opinion, social networking has not meant the death knell of webmail and instant messenger (IM). Compared with 12 months ago, IM traffic, as a percentage of overall traffic has more than doubled, while webmail and social networking increased nearly five times.

As browser-based file sharing applications now use peer-based technology and add clients as a “premium”, the question arises: will the business and security risks introduced by browser-based file sharing follow the same path as those that were introduced by P2P? The frequency of file transfer applications – 92% of FTP, 82% of P2P, and 91% browser-based file sharing—each provide business value, but represent security and business risks that may include exploits, malware vectors, and data loss.

Rene Bonvanie, vice-president of marketing at Palo Alto Networks declared:

“This data should be a wake-up call for IT teams who assume encrypted traffic is mainly HTTPS or for those who still believe that social networking usage is not taking place on their corporate networks.”

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox

Find us on Facebook