Make Internet apps run even through your office network

Don’t you hate it when your employer blocks certain kinds of applications simply based on file or traffic types? I know I do. I find it very frustrating when I am used to working a specific way and then have to change how I do what I do simply because an application I need has been blocked. If you find yourself in a situation like this, then you might want to take a quick look at Proxifier. It’s a multiplatform network utility.

Proxifier allows network applications that do not support working through proxy servers to operate through a SOCKS or HTTPS proxy and chains. With it, you can work with any Internet client through a proxy. You can improve network performance and ensure privacy. The app uses a flexible rule system, and has an easy to use yet powerful UI with live data.

Proxifier is a cool program that can help you route internet traffic through a single or chain of proxy servers to protect your privacy or to help you get key apps running when they might be blocked on specific networks. The biggest issue that I initially saw with the software was that it cannot be installed or used on a network that is already using proxies to govern network traffic. Those proxy settings have to be disabled before Proxifier can be installed and configured. Caution should therefore be used if you’re going to use this application at the office, as you could find yourself without any network or internet access if Proxifier conflicts with configuration scripts used in your enterprise.

Read full Review | Download Proxifier

Related Posts:

Social networking creates big vulnerabilities

After an eight-month study, Palo Alto Networks (an enterprise security and firewall company) released a report that provides a global view into application usage by assessing 28 exabytes of application traffic from 1,253 enterprises between October 2010 and April 2011.

More than 40% of the 1,042 applications that Palo Alto Networks identified on enterprise networks can now use SSL or hop ports to increase their availability within corporate networks. This segment of applications will continue to grow as more applications follow Twitter, Facebook, and Gmail, who all have enabled SSL either as a standard setting or as a user-selectable option in an effort to create the perception of improved security for its end-users.

Contrary to popular opinion, social networking has not meant the death knell of webmail and instant messenger (IM). Compared with 12 months ago, IM traffic, as a percentage of overall traffic has more than doubled, while webmail and social networking increased nearly five times.

As browser-based file sharing applications now use peer-based technology and add clients as a “premium”, the question arises: will the business and security risks introduced by browser-based file sharing follow the same path as those that were introduced by P2P? The frequency of file transfer applications – 92% of FTP, 82% of P2P, and 91% browser-based file sharing—each provide business value, but represent security and business risks that may include exploits, malware vectors, and data loss.

Rene Bonvanie, vice-president of marketing at Palo Alto Networks declared:

“This data should be a wake-up call for IT teams who assume encrypted traffic is mainly HTTPS or for those who still believe that social networking usage is not taking place on their corporate networks.”

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox

Find us on Facebook