More on Tablet Mode

I got a bit sidetracked the other day…

unnamed

So, I’ve been doing a lot of work with windows 10 over the past few weeks. I’ve got Build 9926 installed on just about every Windows machine in the house. I’ve got it on a Surface Pro 1, Surface Pro 3 and a Dell Latitude 10 ST2.

When I started talking about Tablet Mode the other day, it really sorta morphed into a bit on installing it on the ST2, which had its own challenges. I never really got to what tablet mode really is or does on a Windows Pro tablet.

From what I can see right now… not much.

My thought was a bit-more iPad-esque. Believe it or not, I really wanted to see a bit more of a ModernUI approach on a pure tablet device. I mean, that IS what Microsoft was originally shooting for when they released Windows RT and Surface RT. The desktop pretty much hidden, full screen Modern apps, etc.

Yeah, you don’t get any of that…not even when you invoke Continuum (Tablet Mode) either automatically (by removing the keyboard) or manually (by tapping the Tablet Mode button in the Notification Center).

What you do get is a darker display (?? Really?), a static task bar and view back to the desktop and a full screen sized Start Menu when you tap the Start Button. The device is supposed to run all apps in full screen mode; and it does. All Modern apps are supposed to run full screen and without any min/max or close buttons; and they do.

All of which seem a bit useless; and a bit confusing. Microsoft is still mixing their UI’s. This is just more desktop focused and not tablet focused. Fancy that… a tablet, running in tablet mode that is full of desktop UI components. I am SO confused.

I like EVERYONE else under the sun complained bitterly when Windows 8 was released. The whole mix-n-match desktop and tablet OS hybrid drove me nuts, too. However, I can see where a tablet mode might work, and work well if it totally switched interfaces and could be turned on and off by the user where and when needed, and/or activated automatically when the device was separated from its detachable keyboard.

Microsoft needs to pay attention to something like this, because this is what Tablet Mode really should be. Switch the device – in full tablet form factor – into a tablet interface. It’s clear that’s what user’s want… You don’t have to look any further than Apple’s own iPad to see that. Many iPad owners are also Mac owners (and vice-versa) and are happy bopping back and forth between the two now that Convergence is in place under iOS 8 and Yosemite.

I’ve pushed this idea through the Windows Feedback app, with an invite to talk about this; and we’ll see what Microsoft does. I’m not holding my breath or anything; but if they’re looking to find about a bit more about the vision I have for this, then I’m willing to sit down and talk if they are.

What do you think?

Are you a Windows Insider? Are you running Windows 10? Have you ever run

unnamed (2)

Related Posts:

Windows 10 Tablet Mode

It’s a paradigm shift to be sure…

windows10-build-9926-startmenu_large

I’ve been messing around with Windows 10 Technical Preview 2 for a bit now. You can see a bit of my coverage here on Soft32, here where I talk about the new OS’ announcement highlights, and here where I talk about how surprised I was to find out that the latest preview got released about a week early.

Since then, I’ve had a very interesting time installing the OS. As of this writing, the two part article I wrote on how installations went on both a Surface Pro 1 and a Surface Pro 3 went haven’t been published. As I was sitting and thinking about Windows 10, my oldest son (an avid Xbox One fan) and Windows 10’s cool Game DVR, I thought about how he might be able to take advantage of that without a Windows 10 device to use (I use both my Surface Pro devices for work and review purposes and trusting those to a 9-soon-to-be-10 year old isn’t something that I’d recommend to anyone). I then remembered that I have a Dell Latitude 10 ST2 laying around in the home office doing nothing; and thought, “this might be the perfect device for him to use for Xbox One and Game DVR.” It really hasn’t been doing much since my initial review of the device in April of 2012.

The device itself has got low-end components and Windows 8 .x on it was a bit of a bust. I’m hoping Windows 10 with it, “only run what you need” approach to hardware and form factors will run a bit more smoothly than Windows 8 did; but that’s me – forever the optimist.

I’m not holding my breath…

The Dell was already running Windows 10 Build 9841. I wasn’t particularly happy with the performance on the device with that build; and after all of the grief I went through trying to get the thing on there, I decided it just wasn’t worth it, and shelved the device. Now that TP2 is here, I thought… why not dust it off and give it another go..?

I probably should have left the dust alone.

The Dell Latitude ST2 is a pure Windows Pro Tablet. This means it doesn’t have a native, detachable keyboard. It will use USB or Bluetooth keyboards, but it doesn’t have anything like the Surface/Surface Pro Touch/ Type Cover; and as I covered this in the review, it’s still an issue. I’m just sayin’…

Upgrading to Build 9926
This was the stupidest upgrade path I’ve seen in a long time. The Dell had Build 9841 on it. When I went to Windows 10’s Update and Recovery section under Settings, it found a new Preview Build and started to download it. Unfortunately, the first attempted errored out and I had to restart the download.

The build downloaded, but I had to wait until the next morning at the office to install it. It completed too late in the evening for me to start the upgrade. I’ve run into too many issues with Windows 10 installs to just let ‘er rip and let it go on its own. I wanted to baby sit it a bit…

So, I brought the device to work, plugged it into the wall and placed it on my desk. I started the device, hooked into the Wi-Fi network here, and brought up Update and Recovery again in Settings. I started the upgrade…

And wound up with build 9879…

Wait. What..??

How the heck did THAT happen? I was expecting Build 9926…

It became obvious to me that in order to get Build 9926, I had to upgrade to build 9879, run Windows Update, get any needed and important update bits for it; and then check for and download the new preview build. After it was installed, I would need to run Windows Update again to make certain I had the needed Technical Preview Update that provided all of the fixes that have been talked about.

So, as I said, I let the outdated preview build install and then tried to run Windows Update, and that’s where I started bumping into problems. While the big issue with SP3 was its graphics driver, the problem with the Dell Latitude 10 ST2 seems to be its Wi-Fi adapter. I always baby ALL of my equipment, so for me to have problems with a device that’s been shelved since October, was pulled out of the box to do this update and hasn’t left the home office in over 2 years really confused me. I’ve had eyes on the device for months.

For some reason, the Wi-Fi adapter on the Dell Latitude 10 ST2 likes to disappear. And when I say disappear, I mean, TOTALLY disappear. There’s no evidence of it in Device Manager. There’s no disabled adapter in the Network and Sharing Center. It’s just GONE…

That *SHOULDN’T* be just the driver. That should be a hardware problem…like “your ‘stuff’ is broke” problem. Which doesn’t make any sense. Currently *IF* the adapter disappears, it does so after a restart or power on. If the adapter were faulty, it would fail while the unit was on, running and using the adapter (if it was found…). I’ve had the device running Build 9926 (yes, I got there, but there’s more to this story, so stay with me…) for well over 3 hours straight, synching some OneDrive content. I haven’t run into an instance of the tablet dropping the adapter yet; and I’ve handled the device and used it a bit…

The adapter is usually lost after a Windows Update completes, which tells me that it’s a software issue, not a hardware issue. It also doesn’t matter how long the device has been running. If you turn it on, and it finds the adapter and you immediately run Windows Update after the boot cycle finishes, the Wi-Fi adapter will disappear after the device restarts.

Yeah… I’m TOTALLY confused on this one.

I can consistently reproduce this issue after performing a Windows Update (there doesn’t have to be any software to download). The Wi-Fi adapter disappears, is totally missing from the machine, and the ONLY way to get the thing back, is to totally remove ALL power from the device and restart it cold.

You may have to go into the Windows 10 boot loader , choose the Windows Rollback, and then choose the option to turn off your PC. If that doesn’t work, then you pull the battery (the Dell Latitude 10 ST2 has a removable battery…) and disconnect the AC power, let it sit for about 15-30 seconds, replace the batter and then restart. (so having that bug where the boot menu appears isn’t always a bad thing…). I’m also consistently able to reproduce the solution to the problem.

There’s a lot going on here with Windows 10. There are still MANY issues with it that clearly show it is NOT ready for prime time in any real sense of the word. If you don’t mind working through these issues, then Windows 10 may be a good option for you. If not, then you may want to wait a bit before you jump on board. Microsoft has a lot to do before Windows 10 is ready for release later this Fall. It needs to get crackin’, though if you ask me. It’s a little silly to having to jump through hoops like this to get the device to work normally.

Have you installed Windows 10 on any of your Windows 7 or Windows 8.x PC’s? Have you bumped into any issues? Why don’t you join me in the Discussion Area below and tell us about them? I’d love to hear your experiences with Windows 10 Build 9926.

Related Posts:

Microsoft Releases Windows 10 build 9926 and then some

Windows Insiders got a cool surprise on Friday afternoon 2015-01-23

Well, schniekies! Its available now instead of next week. My friend Gabe Aul over at Microsoft surprised me as well as everybody else today when Microsoft released Windows 10 Build 9926 to its Windows Insiders.

Nearly everyone was looking for this sometime next week. However, as I explained recently, I’m a bit of an update nut, and yeah… I decided to check this afternoon on the off chance that Microsoft did in fact release something. I knew when I was checking that I was going to be met with a “no update available” message or with the same ISO from the TechNet Evaluation Center’s Enterprise Download page.

I was wrong. Interestingly enough, Microsoft posted the 9926.0.150119-1648.FBL_AWESOME1501_CLIENTENTERPRISE_VOL_X64FRE_EN-US.ISO file to the download center, and then my friend, Gabe Aul (@GabeAul confirmed it all. The build is available now.

Tweet9926

If you’re a Windows Insider, get to downloading. If you’re not, but want to apply to become one, you can check out the Windows Insiders home page and apply for a spot there.

After you download the software and install it, you will need to run Windows Update. Microsoft has already released fixes to a few problems in the build. You can get the straight poop on all of the issues the hot fixes resolve, here.

Tweet9926Update

…Unfortunately – and I’m hoping it’s all the download traffic – the MS KB article came up totally empty when I tried to view it. However, I was able to snag the deets on all of the updates elsewhere. The hot fixes for Build 9926 address the following issues:

Reliability improvements to prevent some system crashes in explorer.exe
Fixes an issue that could cause a deleted app to be unintentionally reinstalled
Increased power efficiency to extend battery life
Reliability improvements for virtual machine live migrations
Performance improvements for Internet Explorer
Fixes an issue that could cause pending Windows Updates to be incorrectly reported in the update history
Fixes an issue that could cause the Start Menu to be improperly registered and fail to launch
Fixes an issue that could cause random pixilation on the screen when using Remote Desktop Client

It should be noted that this is NOT the same build that Microsoft demoed at their press event on 2015-01-21. The build demoed there was Build 9944, and this is a few builds behind (Build 9926)

Related Posts:

Find and fix issues on your Windows PC with PCKeeper

pckeeper-iconLet’s face it – you’re busy. You have a lot going on with your kids, your job, and your online lives. The last thing you need are unsolvable PC problems to crop up to add frustration and complication to your life when you least expect it. It’s a good thing that there are applications like PCKeeper available. It’s a PC utility that can keep your PC running and running well.

Everybody has one – a go-to PC guy that can usually solve your PC problems with a couple of clicks of your mouse. The problem is, the guy has a life beyond making sure your PC is circling the while porcelain bowl of death. That’s where PCKeeper comes in.

When your PC guy is busy, PCKeeper can bring your PC back into line. With its Find &Fix feature, PCKeeper gathers your PC’s system information and sends it to a technical expert who will find and fix all security and performance issues. You can use Find & Fix whenever you want to analyze your system for security and performance issues. PCKeeper recommends that you use Find & Fix every 30 days or so.

If you have questions about what’s going on with your PC or perhaps something you’re curious about, you can try Geek on Demand. With it, you can get expert answers literally any technical question you might have. All you need to do is choose one of the suggested problem areas and describe your problem in detail. You will receive a guaranteed answer within 48 hours.

PCK-02

No PC utility would be complete without antivirus, and PCKeeper is no exception. PCKeeper Antivirus protects you from all kinds of threats in your everyday life that may arise from surfing the net, sending emails, sharing and exchanging info online etc. The best thing about PCKeeper’s AV solution is that its integrated with Microsoft Security Center, making it a native Microsoft antivirus protection tool with automatic scans and daily virus signature updates.

With Files Recovery you can restore accidentally deleted documents, media and other files even if they were removed from the Recycle Bin.

When to Use It?
Use Files Recovery after you’ve lost important data due to application crash, virus activity or someone else messing with your files.

If you don’t have a PC utility that can keep your PC straight, then you need to stop what you’re doing and take a trip over to PCKeeper’s data page at Soft32. PCKeeper is an amazing application that offers a great deal more than AV and click and fix applets. Its also a great data security app that can hide files and folders, keeping sensitive information private. When you want to remove information from your hard drive, PCKeeper’s file Shredder can insure the data can’t be accessed. When you want to recover data that’s accidentally been erased (not Shredded, but erased), PCKeeper can bring it back, too. This is a must have app for your Windows PC.

Download PCKeeper

Related Posts:

TuneUp360

Protect and repair your PC with this cool Windows utility.

tuneup360Taking care of your PC isn’t always easy. There’s no end to things that can go wrong. That’s why I like apps like TuneUp360. It’s a complete toolbox utility for Windows.

Half the time when things go wrong with your computer, determining the cause is most of the work. TuneUp360 makes easy work of diagnosing and fixing various system errors with its intelligent error knowledge base. With it, you can prevent computer freezes and crashes by comprehensively fixing various system errors, system conflicts and misconfigurations.

TuneUp360 protects your internet security and privacy by tuning your computer’s security settings to close up backdoors that can be hijacked by viruses, Trojans, and spyware. You can dramatically speed up your computer and internet by fixing all issues slowing your surfing down. When you’re done surfing, TuneUp360 can cover your tracks, by eliminating your browsing history and surfing habits.

TU-02

If your PC’s registry is bloated, TuneUp360’s Redundancy Cleaner can clean your computer’s unnecessary and useless registry entries. This, in conjunction with its PC Stability Checker helps improve your PC’s stability by scanning your Windows, registry and application errors. It will even help you optimize system services and release more resources for Windows and other running software.

Download TuneUp360

Related Posts:

Keep your computer running well with Windows Doctor

With nearly the entire computer-verse running some version of Windows, keeping your PC running well has become a huge subject of interest. I for one, am constantly tweaking my PC trying to eek out every last possible gram of performance from it. This is one of the reasons why I like applications like Windows Doctor. It’s a performance utility for Windows.

Windows Doctor is a comprehensive PC care utility that helps you easily protect, maintain and optimize the performance of your computer. It provides an all-in-one solution for your PC’s daily maintenance and protection. It protects your system by locating and fixing all its system vulnerabilities.

Windows Doctor can speed up your system and internet access by as much as 100%. By tuning-up Windows, Windows Doctor can significantly boost your system and internet speed. It provides an all-around optimization of your system so that the overall PC performance can be highly improved.

If you’re on a shared machine, or just concerned with privacy in general, Windows Doctor can take care of you. It cleans historic traces left by many different applications so you’ll have no more worries about your computing habits being disclosed. Windows Doctor is able to clean all the traces from your computer.

If you’ve got PC errors that you’re constantly bumping into, Windows Doctor has you covered there as well. With it, you can fix dozens kinds of PC errors in order to make your computer run smoothly. Most PC errors are caused by invalid registry entries. Windows Doctor can clean and optimize your Windows registry, making your PC error free.

Read full review | Download Windows Doctor

Related Posts:

Scan, fix and repair issues on your computer with Reimage

The Windows Registry is a touchy thing. Screw up your Registry, and I don’t care how great your PC is. The performance is going to tank. This is one of the reasons why I like Reimage. It’s a Swiss army knife utility for windows.

With Reimage, you can perform a quick scan of your PC’s Windows operating system. This will help you uncover specific information that will help you understand the problems your system has and what needs to be repaired. While the Registry is one of the items it scans, Reimage does a lot more.

Reimage scans for security threats. Malware including computer viruses, worms, Trojan horses, spyware, dishonest adware and other malicious and unwanted software are easily identified. Any files that have been tagged as malicious and harmful to your system will be deactivated and quarantined.

If your PC is having hardware issues, such as low memory, hard disk speed, CPU power and temperature, Reimage can recommend solutions for you. For example, if your PC’s CPU temperature is too high, you’ll be advised to clean your cooling fan. If the scan detects low memory, you’ll be advised to add more, etc.

Reimage is also the only PC repair service that has the ability to reverse the damage done to your operating system by replacing any damaged or missing files on a Windows operating system. It does this with the use of a continuously updated online database of over 25,000,000 updated essential components. Every time you run the Reimage program, it will immediately download the latest version and files you’ll need for a successful repair.

Read full Review | Download Reimage

Related Posts:

Keep your PC running in top condition with Norton Utilities 15

I remember back in the day when Norton Utilities was actually written by Peter Norton. They were THE set of utilities to have for your DOS based PC, and in many ways today, offer a great deal of protection and peace of mind. That’s why I feel that this PC based, Windows utility package is a must have.

Norton Utilities helps your PC run like new. With them you can speed up PC performance and boot time, fix common PC problems with a single mouse click, reduces launch time of applications by optimizing the registry, increase storage and performance by defragmenting and cleaning up the hard drive and of course, recuing accidentally deleted files. It’s a package that most every Windows user should seriously consider purchasing.

Norton Disk Doctor identifies and fixes potential problems that can lead to hard drive crashes. You can use it to save your bacon, should you start experiencing random data errors in files you know are uncorrupted elsewhere. Norton UnErase lets you quickly restore accidentally deleted files that may be hidden on your hard drive, provided they space they occupy hasn’t been overwritten with other data. Norton Smart Updates keeps Norton Utilities up-to-date by automatically installing product updates. Startup Manager improves PC boot time by choosing which programs will load at startup time and Norton Service Manager optimizes active Windows services so applications can run simultaneously without your PC experiencing any slowdowns.

Read full review | Download Norton Utilities 15

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox

Find us on Facebook