Microsoft OneDrive Screws the Pooch

Having OneDrive on a non-NTFS partition is no longer allowed…

Over the past week or so, many, but not all, Microsoft OneDrive users have been dealing with a very confusing and very troubling issue regarding Microsoft OneDrive – If your OneDrive data store is on any other volume other than an NTFS volume, OneDrive will stop synching and display the following error message

OneDrive Error Message

Like many Windows users, during the week of 2017-06-25 through 2017-07-01, everything was fine. My Surface Book and OneDrive were working as expected. With the extended Independence Day holiday here in the States, most users – myself included – were off between 2017-06-30 through 2017-07-04. My first day back to work that week was Wednesday 2017-07-05. I didn’t have my Surface Book out that day, as my day had me pretty much confined to my desk due to my extended holiday break. While my work PC has OneDrive on it, my synched files are on the main drive, and its formatted to NTFS already.

The next day, I was greeted with the error message dialog box shown above. I was totally taken by surprise and really didn’t know what to do. So, I took to Twitter, and asked one of my most reliable contacts, Mary Jo Foley if she knew what was going on. She did, and the news was both good and bad.

OneDrive NTFS

It was nice to know that the issue was known and that someone had tried to start a conversation with Microsoft on it. What I found disturbing, was that Microsoft was – and still is – virtually nonexistent on the thread. They haven’t replied at ALL to any of the users looking for any kind of answers. However, one user – Jeremy Chu – did get an answer to the inquiry he made directly with Microsoft. I’ve reproduced it in its entirety, here:

Hi,

We stopped supporting non-NTFS file systems. This is affecting users with FAT32, Exeats and ReFS file systems. Users can get unblocked by converting the drive to NTFS.

Basically all you have do is, from a command prompt, type:

convert D: /fs:ntfs (if the drive in question is currently d:\)

Or visit – http://odsp.westeurope.cloudapp.azure.com/qq/onedrive-sync-client-pushed-out-a-change-where-we/ to get more insights!!!

Unfortunately, if you were unable to do so, contact our windows support team : https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/contact/menu/

Thanks,
OneDrive Team

It’s nice that Microsoft has finally acknowledged the issue; but it took them over four days to do so; and to be honest, the thread that I’m referencing is the OFFICIAL issue thread, and they haven’t responded there at all.

At all…

As far as many of us are concerned on that thread, their lack of communication was making many think that this is a simple bump in the road; and that at some point, Microsoft would “correct” the problem. With the response that Jeremy got, that’s clearly NOT the case. And it’s very unfortunate.

Now… there are a couple of issues here. I haven’t really jumped on my rant soapbox this month, at least not until now, so please bear with me. I’m going to cover them as quickly as I can.

Terms of Service
There has to be an out for Microsoft in the OneDrive Terms of Service that basically says,

“we provide the service (even if you pay for it); and you’ll use what you’re given, the way we give it to you, or you can go elsewhere.” Or in more legal terms,

“we reserve the right to change the way the service works as we see fit, with or without any notice to you”

And if this is the case, AND you agreed to those terms of service before you started using Microsoft OneDrive, then you have little to no recourse in the matter. In truth, if you didn’t agree to the service’s terms of service, you wouldn’t be in the boat, because you wouldn’t be using it. You can’t use the service without agreeing to its terms, first. Which brings me to my second point…

Communications
Like many users, this likely wouldn’t have been an issue or a problem at all – provided that Microsoft had communicated the change – giving users the opportunity to prepare for the change. There may be some OneDrive users – and I’m thinking specifically of OneDrive for Business users – that may not be able to convert their drives to NTFS for one reason or another

If there had been some kind of notice on this, many would have had the chance to prepare for the change and either convert their drives – via the process outlined by the OneDrive Team, above – or to just blow the old data store and resync everything.

However, without any kind of heads up or official notice from Microsoft that the change was coming, many users were caught off guard… which is problematic. You never want to catch your users off guard. While the service owner can do almost anything they want once they Terms of Service are accepted by a customer, there is an aspect of service interruptions and uptime that needs to be addressed, and unfortunately, the way this initially appeared, despite the error dialog box, above, this appeared as an outage and not as the dropping of support for non-NTFS formatted drives on local data stores.

Bad form, Microsoft. Bad form!

What about other platforms??
The one big thing that I see missing here, is any kind of statement from Microsoft on how this change effects other platforms – like macOS. macOS uses HSF+ and ApFS (Apple File System) and Microsoft hasn’t said anything about how the switch to NFTS will or will not affect Macs and Mac users using OneDrive for Mac.

Then again, they also haven’t said if this has anything to do with Files on Demand or any other feature, either. Though to be honest, it like does have something to do with some OneDrive updates that are scheduled to hit in the Fall Creators Update (FCU).

However, what’s really kind of confusing is whether or not OneDrive’s NTFS requirement also excludes drives formatted with ReFS or Microsoft’s Resilient File System. ReFS is close to NTFS, but apparently doesn’t support one of the big features that OneDrive needs – reparse points. If this is the case, the question that is begged here is whether or not OneDrive will work (or continue to work) with ReFS; or better yet why Microsoft hasn’t updated ReFS to work with OneDrive.

Did you bump into this problem over the past week or so? Did you have OneDrive synching your data to an SD card or to an older, external drive that was formatted as FAT32? How did you resolve the issue? Did you do what I did and just knuckled under and reformatted the drive and resynchronized? Or did you convert the drive? Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area below, and let me know? I’d love to hear from you!

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If there’s one thing I’ve learned over the past five to six years of being a Mac, its that hard drive management under OS X is MUCH easier than under Windows.  With OS X, upgrading to a larger, bigger, better, faster, stronger hard drive is as easy as making a copy of your hard. There are some really nice utilities out there that do that very well. With Windows machines, its not even remotely close to being that easy. This is why I really like tools like Hard Disk Manager Suite. It’s a hard drive utility for Windows.

Paragon’s Hard Disk Manager Suite is a serious hard drive tool.  Its advanced weaponry for your Windows system and as such, isn’t for people that aren’t comfortable working under the hood.  It has a completely new engine for all partitioning tasks; and works generically with all modern hard drive technologies, regardless of spindle type, drive size, rotation speed, etc.

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2. Type: convert k: /fs:ntfs (substitute k: with the letter of the USB flash drive of the partition you wish to convert, then press enter)

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