Get detailed information about your computer hardware with CPU-Z

Troubleshooting PC issues isn’t always easy. Hardware issues… Software issues… Issues with software and peripherals… sometimes it’s difficult to know which end of your PC is giving you grief. This is one of the reasons why I like CPU-Z. It’s a hardware detection tool for Windows.

CPU-Z is freeware that gathers information on some of the main devices of your system. It gives you the name and number of your CPU, its core stepping and process information, package information, core voltage information, as well as information on instructions sets and cache information.

When it comes to your motherboard, you get vendor, model and revision; BIOS model and date, Chipset (Northbridge and Southbridge) and sensor; as well as the Graphic interface and amount of memory. Speaking of memory, when it comes to the RAM installed in your system, you’ll also get the specifics of frequency and timings, Module(s) specification using SPD (Serial Presence Detect), as well as vendor, serial number, and a timings table.

Getting detailed information on your hardware can be very important if you’re trying to troubleshoot your PC or if you’ve purchased a PC third hand, and need to find out what’s installed in it so you can safely modify or upgrade it. CPU-Z is a great little utility for providing you specific information on your PC’s components. If you’re running a virtual machine, though, don’t look to get too much information from it. I tried and was unable to get it to give me much more information other than the type of processor I had.

Download CPU-Z

Related Posts:

Capture your gaming experience with Fraps

Although I have access to all kinds of software, finding a proper one for my personal use becomes an annoying thing sometimes. That’s maybe because I tend to notice only the bad things from a software or maybe because I know that there should be a better one undiscovered yet. One of these examples, that really surprised me was Fraps. A tiny but very powerful software.

With the help of Direct X and OpenGL technology, this software can capture in realtime any video source from your desktop, can capture screenshots in BMP, PNG, JPG and TGA formats and can be used also as a benchmarking software. Fraps can save your work into any folder, without any prompting message or any preview screen. This can be done by using hotkeys which can be activated from the main interface. You won’t feel anything wrong in the game while you make these screenshots.

The same goes with the video capturing. This represents the best part of this application. The game will not slow down a moment (unless you have a really poor system), and the resulting video file has an astonishing quality. All this while I was running a game at a resolution of 1280×1024. The reason for this is because the application won’t use any compression tool for capturing the video. It will be saved in a pure AVI format without compression. You won’t get any framed clips and the sound will match the image perfectly.

Fraps 3.5 adds the much requested feature to allow AVI movie files larger than 4 gigabytes. Fraps will now write hybrid OpenDML/AVI files and allow large movies on NTFS drives. There’s still an option to split at 4 gigabytes for legacy AVI 1.0 support.

Fraps can be used also as a Benchmarking Software, by monitoring the frames of any game. The FPS counter can be displayed on the screen along with the game. The statistics can be saved on your disk for further analyzes and reviews.

Please be aware that the minimum system requirements have changed in Fraps 3.5.0. We now require a CPU with SSE2 instructions (Pentium 4 & above). Windows XP or higher is also now required. If you have an older system (Win2K or non-SSE2 CPU) you can still download the previous Fraps 3.4.7 release from the Members Area.

download Fraps 3.50

Related Posts:

Push your PC to its limits with AIDA64 and find out how stable it is

When it comes to personal computers, facing some problems is inevitable. Sometimes the problems are quite simple and they are mostly caused by your Operating System, other software or nasty things such as viruses, malware or spyware. But what if you suspect there is a problem with one of those different components that are connected to your motherboard? This is the case when you need to test your hardware with one of those tools out there which makes your computer run at its fastest possible speed for an extended period of time and then checks for any errors that occur. My favorite software with this purpose is AIDA64 Extreme Edition.

AIDA64 Extreme Edition is a streamlined Windows diagnostic and benchmarking software for home users and provides a wide range of features to assist in overclocking, hardware error diagnosis, stress testing, and sensor monitoring. It has unique capabilities to assess the performance of the processor, system memory, disk drives and now with the release of version 2, it offers a fully automatized online update, AVX-optimized 64-bit benchmarks for the upcoming Intel Core i7 “Sandy Bridge-E” processors, and further extends its exhaustive hardware database with Western Digital hard disk drives to cover 133,000 devices total.

AIDA64 is compatible with all current 32-bit and 64-bit Microsoft Windows operating systems, including Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and you can get it from here.

Related Posts:

AMD Interlagos – the biggest change in x86 servers in a decade – available in Q4

AMD will release the first Opteron server processors to feature its new “Bulldozer”  32-nanometer cores. This is world’s first 16-core x86 processor, codenamed “Interlagos”.

Compatible with existing AMD Opteron 6100 Series platforms and infrastructure, “Interlagos” is expected to launch and be available in partner systems in the fourth quarter of this year. Many of the initial shipments have been earmarked for large custom supercomputer installations that are now underway.

This is a monumental moment for the industry as this first ‘Bulldozer’ core represents the beginning of unprecedented performance scaling for x86 CPUs,” said Rick Bergman, senior vice president and general manager, AMD Products Group. “The flexible new ‘Bulldozer’ architecture will give Web and datacenter customers the scalability they need to handle emerging cloud and virtualization workloads.

To find out more about the new Cores, take a look at the interactive video below…

Acording to AMD, the new processor cores offer up to 50% more throughput as AMD’s current 12-core Opterons while sitting in the same power envelope.

Related Posts:

Test your computer’s power capacity with BenchTown

Auslogics have released a free benchmarking tool that can test your computer power capacity and publish the results on their online service. All you have to do is to install the BenchTown client program and register for free on BenchTown.com. There’s nothing new here, but the way Auslogics designed BenchTown and its online service really impressed me. Everything is user-friendly an requires little to be done from the user point of view.

All you have to do in order to start test your machine is to push the Rate button. The whole process is automatically and takes about 4 – 5 minutes to be completed. The application uses standard stress calculations for each main component of your PC, (CPU, RAM, HDD, VGA). The results will be displayed in the same interface along with an overall mark similar to what 3D Mark has to offer.

Your can also compare your results online with your friends on the BenchTown service. If you don’t have any friends registered on this community, just invite them. You can also view overall charts based on community’s results regarding the type of processor they use, what are the most popular VGA models used, etc.

With BenchTown the testing process becomes simple and fun to analyze even for a casual user. The overall image of his system is no more an enigma due to the comprehensive results and the user-friendly way BenchTown displays them.

download Auslogics BenchTown

Related Posts:

Monitor your PC with Microsoft Process Explorer

Ever wondered which program has a particular file or directory open? Now you can find out. Process Explorer shows you information about which handles and DLLs processes have opened or loaded.

The Process Explorer comes with two sub-windows. The top one shows a list of the currently active processes, including the names of their owning accounts. The bottom window shows a different information based on the mode that Process Explorer is in. For example if you set the application to be in handle mode you’ll see the handles that the process selected in the top window has opened. If Process Explorer is set in DLL mode you’ll see the DLLs and memory-mapped files that the process has loaded.

Version 15.0 of this application comes with a GPU usage monitor. Unfortunately this feature is not visible by default so you have to search for it in the View tab -> Columns in order to activate it. Once you’ve done this, the System Information window will show also your GPU activity based on GPU Usage, GPU Private Data, GPU Committed Bytes, or GPU Shared Bytes in graph mode.

Process Explorer’s latest version includes also the ability to restart a service. You just have to double-click a process instance, click the Service tab, choose the desired service and click Restart. In this way Process Explorer will stop and start it for you. Though you should be careful while restarting services, because you can cause your system to crash in case you have chosen a wrong one.

download Microsoft Process Explorer

Related Posts:

Intel Reinvents Transistors Using New 3-D Structure

Intel Corporation announces a significant breakthrough in the evolution of the transistor. For the first time since the invention of silicon transistors over 50 years ago, transistors using a three-dimensional structure will be put into high-volume manufacturing. Intel will introduce a revolutionary 3-D transistor design called Tri-Gate, first disclosed by Intel in 2002, into high-volume manufacturing at the 22-nanometer (nm) node in an Intel chip codenamed “Ivy Bridge.” A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter.

Intel’s 3-D Tri-Gate transistors enable chips to operate at lower voltage with lower leakage, providing an unprecedented combination of improved performance and energy efficiency compared to previous state-of-the-art transistors. The capabilities give chip designers the flexibility to choose transistors targeted for low power or high performance, depending on the application.

The 22nm 3-D Tri-Gate transistors provide up to 37 percent performance increase at low voltage versus Intel’s 32nm planar transistors. This incredible gain means that they are ideal for use in small handheld devices, which operate using less energy to “switch” back and forth. Alternatively, the new transistors consume less than half the power when at the same performance as 2-D planar transistors on 32nm chips.

The performance gains and power savings of Intel’s unique 3-D Tri-Gate transistors are like nothing we’ve seen before,” said Mark Bohr, Intel Senior Fellow. “This milestone is going further than simply keeping up with Moore’s Law. The low-voltage and low-power benefits far exceed what we typically see from one process generation to the next. It will give product designers the flexibility to make current devices smarter and wholly new ones possible. We believe this breakthrough will extend Intel’s lead even further over the rest of the semiconductor industry.

The 3-D Tri-Gate transistor will be implemented in the company’s upcoming manufacturing process, called the 22nm node, in reference to the size of individual transistor features. More than 6 million 22nm Tri-Gate transistors could fit in the period at the end of this sentence.

This silicon technology breakthrough will also aid in the delivery of more highly integrated Intel® Atom™ processor-based products that scale the performance, functionality and software compatibility of Intel® architecture while meeting the overall power, cost and size requirements for a range of market segment needs.

Related Posts:

What kind of laptop is right for you?

In this guide, we’ll outline the different categories of laptops and which types are best for different users. We’ll also take a look at CPU, hard-drive, and networking options.

While there are many ways to divide the categories–based on weight, price, and components–the screen size is the primary deciding factor, as it’s the clearest physical difference between types of laptops.

UMPCs (or ultramobile PCs) are small handheld devices with screens that are between 5 and 7 inches, but they never really caught on. While the idea of a palm-size computer Dell d620 running Microsoft Windows and including most of the features you’d find on a full-size desktop or laptop was an engaging one, most of these devices were not exactly practical outside of a handful of specialized users.

Key features:
5- to 7-inch display
Nontraditional design

Netbook

Netbooks are either the most exciting thing to happen to mobile computing in years, (Acer aspire 4520 battery) or they are the downfall of an industry engaged in a painful price war race to the bottom. We generally define Netbooks as having 7- to 12-inch screens, a full keyboard, and an inexpensive, single-core low-voltage CPU.

While the earliest Netbooks had 7-inch screens and Intel Celeron processors, the typical Netbook today has a single-core Intel Atom CPU, 1GB of RAM, a 160GB hard drive, and runs either Windows XP or Windows 7.

Small and lightweight, they lack optical drives, have tiny keyboards and touch pads, and are generally underpowered for anything other than Web surfing, e-mailing, and basic office productivity. The payoff is that a typical Netbook can be had for less than $300, an unheard-of sum just a few years ago.

Key features:
9- to 12-inch display
No optical drive
Single-core low-voltage CPU, Intel Atom or comparable
Typically less than $500

Ultraportable

Before the rise of Netbooks, ultraportable systems were 11- and 12-inch laptops with then-expensive low-voltage CPUs, allowing them to be small and power efficient, but still relatively underpowered.

The popularity of Netbooks had threatened to make this category irrelevant–after all, who would pay $1,500 or more for an 11-inch laptop, when a $300 10-inch Netbook hp nx6100 battery (Hp dv9000) adapter was a reasonable substitute for basic Web and office tasks?

The ultraportable has been revived of late with the introduction of Intel’s new low-cost consumer ultralow-voltage CPUs. These chips are slightly more expensive and somewhat more powerful than the Netbook Intel Atom CPU, and are available in both single-core and dual-core versions.

Key features:
9- to 12-inch display
Low-voltage ULV CPU
No optical drive
Typically $600-$800

Thin-and-light

This somewhat unimaginative descriptor is intended for 13-inch laptops. Why do laptops with 13-inch displays deserve their own distinct category? It’s because they occupy a unique space in the industry. We define this by pointing out that a 13-inch laptop is the smallest size we’d be able to work on comfortably all day, and at the same time, the largest size we’d consider carrying around more than once or twice a week.

read the full article on: http://www.goodlaptopbattery.co.uk/battery-blog/

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox

Find us on Facebook