iPhone Leprosy, or Touch Disease

If you have an iPhone 6 or 6 Plus, you need to check this out…

Just in time for you to trade in your iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus, a new iPhone hardware issue involving the 2014 model cellular iDevice has hit the news wire – Touch Disease.

Touch Disease is a hardware defect effecting both iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus devices and is identified by a malfunction in the touch screen where user touch input is not read or not interpreted correctly and therefore ignored by the device. Symptoms of the defect are usually preceded by a grey flickering band at the top of the screen, just under the iSight camera and speaker, regardless of device orientation. This symptom can be sporadic and may respond to torqueing or pressing on the device.

touch disease

Replacing the touch screen does not resolve the issue.

According to Apple Insider, the issue may be related to the 2015 “Bend-gate” issue where the larger and thinner smartphones were warping due to inappropriate and in proportionate pressure or force being applied to the screen and to the device case, causing it to bend. This was most often seen by users who carried their device in their back pocket, and then sat down, causing the device to warp and bend in appropriately.

The relation of Touch Disease to Bend-gate is likely in eventual cracking or breaking of solder joints breaking on the device’s touch controller chips. Your device’s touch screen ignores input because the electrical connections to it its controller chips have been interrupted.

This is further exacerbated due to the fact that Apple didn’t use any underfil (sticky stuff) to keep the touch screen control chips securely attached to the PCB. Instead of using a metal shield to further keep the chips in place and to help prevent device bending, Apple chose to go with a sticker (literally… a STICKER) instead.

There are a couple/ three fixes available for this, if your iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus device has Touch Disease:

1. Device Replacement – If you have Apple Care, and you can demonstrate the issue for any Apple Genius, they will likely just swap the device out for you. However, the new device you get is still likely Touch Disease susceptible, so you may have to change the way you carry and use the device or it’s going to happen again. This is likely the quickest way to solving your problem; and its likely free
2. Logic Board Replacement – This takes longer, but will also resolve the problem, provided your case isn’t bent or warped, in which case, you’d be better off with a complete device replacement. This is likely covered under Apple Care (and will likely be what Apple does to all effected units it refurbs); but will probably only happen to you if you go somewhere else OTHER than an Apple Store to resolve the issue or if you don’t have Apple Care.
3. Solder Reflow – Repair shops can simply apply enough heat to the existing, broken solder joints and get the solder to reconnect the chips to the PCB. However, this will likely invalidate any warranty you have.
4. Purchase a New iPhone – Many uses without Apple care or Assurion warranty coverage are finding that the only real way to resolve the issue for them is to buy another device.

I was able to see on Mashable that non-Apple Care covered repairs could cost you anywhere between $85 to $250 bucks. New devices are going to be much higher than that depending on where you buy.

This issue does not affect the iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus, as it uses a less bendable, 7000 series aluminum case.

Has your iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus exhibited signs of iPhone Leprosy, or Touch Disease? Did you have an issue with Bend-gate? Do you carry your device in either a front pants or rear pants pocket? Have you noticed that your iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus exhibits a slight bend or warp to its casing? I’d love to hear from you if you’ve had any of these things happen to you. Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area below, and tell me about it?

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Apple Support for Boot Camp – You’re on Your Own

I am developing a very serious problem with Apple’s support position when it comes to Boot Camp and Windows – You’re on your own.  Really..??

I bought my first Mac in December of 2006. In fact, I bought my Mac at that time to BE a Windows machine, largely because the hardware was so wonderful. Boot Camp was still in beta at that point, and it wasn’t very well put together at the time. Many of the features provided by Mac drivers were not supported on the Boot Camp side. Quite frankly, it was a mess.

Today, Boot Camp 4.0 is solid, well put together; and it runs Windows 7, 32bit or 64bit without much need for heavy lifting from the end user, especially on Apple’s more current Mac models. Many people are using it to run Windows, either as a primary or secondary partition on their Macs, again, because the hardware is perhaps, the best in the industry.

Case in point, my mother has a Late 2009 15″ MacBook Pro. Her chosen OS is Windows, and she’s running Windows 7 32bit on a Boot Camp 4.0 partition on her Mac.  Its recently developed some booting issues, and as she has Apple Care I recommended that she take it to her local Apple Store for assistance in troubleshooting her problem.

The Genius at the Genius Bar refused to help her, stating that Apple doesn’t provide assistance with Windows.  This isn’t the first time I’ve heard this with either my parent’s Macs, my Mac or with other Apple Customer’s supported, under Apple Care Macs; and quite frankly, it’s WRONG.

Windows is a mess…however, there are really only so many different ways to run Windows on an Intel-powered Mac: via virtual machine (Parallels Desktop or VMWare Fusion) and Boot Camp.

Both Parallels Desktop and VMWare Fusion are Mac apps, and Apple will generally help you insure that you’ve got the apps setup right, and at least configured correctly so that your Mac has the best chance of running Windows correctly.  This is largely due to the fact that both Parallels Desktop and Fusion have most of their heavy lifting due by a Mac operating system.

The other way to run Windows on a Mac is natively through a Boot Camp partition, using Apple’s provided Boot Camp drivers for all of the included hardware.  While Windows may have some of the drivers in its driver cache, it doesn’t and won’t have all of them.  You’ll need Boot Camp for some of the hardware, like the Bluetooth radio, iSight web cam, keyboard backlight, etc.

I get that Apple doesn’t want to support Windows or troubleshoot all of the myriad problems that may crop up on any Mac running Windows. I TOTALLY get it; and I agree and don’t blame them…sort of.

Apple needs to alter their stance and provide installation and start-up support.  Most of the problems with Windows on Macs comes as either an installation issue or as a startup/driver based issue.  Anything else other than that is likely due to registry issues due to installed or uninstalled software.

I can see Apple declining to support the performance or other issues, post setup or startup. Windows isn’t their OS, and there’s too much a user can do to mess things up. It’s very easy to mess up a Windows installation, too.  However, for someone like my mother, a senior citizen who has little to no computer savvy, the guy at the Genius Bar should have at least confirmed for her that her hardware was fine, and that Windows could startup. All he did was boot the Mac side and send her on her way.  No other troubleshooting or diagnostics were done. My mother was in the store less than 30 minutes.

That…isn’t cool.

There’s no way that simply booting to the Mac side of the world could have determined that the hard drive wasn’t having issues, or that perhaps Boot Camp created the partition incorrectly.  I’m not infallible, perhaps the Boot Camp drivers weren’t installed correctly when I initially built the Windows partition…that’s likely not the case, but the Genius wouldn’t know that, and didn’t take the time to find out.

I don’t have a problem troubleshooting things long distance for any of my relatives, especially when they can send me their computer, but for an older, non-computer savvy customer with active Apple Care on their Mac…I expected a heck of a lot more; and you should too.

Boot Camp is a legitimate part of OS X.  Apple needs to stop treating it and its users like a red-haired step child and provide them with the same level of support they provide for all of their other paying customers.

I’m just sayin’…

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