Get that iDevice for Cheap

Now I know why Gazelle has been hoarding mobile devices…

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Don’t get me wrong… I’m not one to push a particular web site on anyone or to provide any corporate organization with any kind of free advertising or free publicity. However, anyone who’s anyone that owns or has owned a smartphone or tablet and has replaced it over the past few years has run into the problem of what exactly to do with the old and busted once you’ve replaced with the new hotness.

It’s actually pretty easy; and it can provide some much needed extra cash if all that “old and busted” is gonna do is sit in a drawer or closet and collect dust. I’m talking about Gazelle, and like I said, if you’re replaced an outgoing mobile device, I know you’ve heard of it.

However, I’m not going to extol the virtues of selling your old and busted electronics to Gazelle. Everyone’s already heard that story and I’m not going to retell it. However, what I AM going to speak to today is how you can turn the tables and BUY from Gazelle as well.

Yes. You can buy from Gazelle just as easily as you can sell to them. Gazelle has been collecting older electronics for the last three to four years or so. Everyone – well, at least *I* – thought that they were going to sell the older devices in emerging markets (meaning smaller third world nations) where only the super-duper elite rich can afford the latest and greatest of anything.

Not so kemo-slobby!

Gazelle unveiled its used electronics purchasing arm a while ago, and I had the opportunity to use it recently, and I wanted to tell everyone about it.

I have been blessed. Truly blessed to be able to have a job that allows me to afford to purchase and review a number of different technology items over the years. Some I’ve passed to my daughter after a review period. Some have been sold through either eBay or Craig’s List. Some have been sold to Gazelle.

Recently, my wife and I decided to give our boys iPad minis for Christmas, but didn’t want to pay full price for them. I knew I wasn’t buying new, and after looking at and rejecting Apple Certified Refurbished deals as a bit more expensive than I wanted to pay, I decided to explore other options. I knew eBay and Craig’s List were out. I’ve not had great luck with either lately. Unfortunately, eBay has really lost a lot of is luster from its glory days of the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. Craig’s List never quite sat well with me, even as a seller.

I had heard that Gazelle was now selling devices, so I took a quick trip over to their Home Page and took a look around. I was very pleased with the results. I was able to find 16GB black iPad minis with Retina Displays for the boys at $209 USD a piece. After shipping and handling, that came to about $425 USD. So for less than the price of a new iPad mini, I was able to get two, shipped to the house for my boys for Christmas.

Services like Gazelle are very picky about the quality of devices they accept. They only want the best kept gadgets so that they appear as like new and/ or in mint condition when they are resold. That way, you feel as though you’re getting and/ or giving the best, especially around The Holidays.

If you’re looking for a way to afford giving a high end device for The Holidays and don’t mind buying used (as long as the device doesn’t LOOK or ACT used), then you might want to take a serious look at Gazelle. They’re likely going to have what you’re looking for without having Santa say, “Ho-Ho-NO!” instead of, “Ho-Ho-Ho!”

You can check out Gazelle’s Certified, Pre-Owned devices, including major carriers and unlocked devices via their home page (or use the above link).

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7″ iPad Rumor Analysis – Part 2: Is the Customer Always Right?

There’s are reasons why Apple hasn’t released the rumored iPad Mini. In part 2 of this 2 part series, I break down the rumors…

Apple rumors are fun. Apple’s secretive culture often sparks and breeds the development of rumors and many people in the tech journalism industry love to speculate and see how right the mill is every time Apple releases new products. Last minute speculations aside, it’s difficult to crack the Apple rumor nut. However, after slowly and carefully finishing the Steve Jobs Biography, I think I have a decent understanding of where Steve was wanting things with Apple Product Development to go.

I’ve had a couple people come to me over the past couple of weeks and either ask me about or tell me about the rumored 7″ iPad, nicknamed the “iPad Mini,” that Apple is supposedly set to release “soon.” I’ve chuckled a bit at these folks and their immediate response was, “What..? You don’t think they’re going to release it?”

My response has been, “I don’t know.”

Trying to guess what Apple is going to do with their product road map is very much like trying to predict the weather – there’s gonna be some [weather]; and forecasters have a 50-50 chance of being right.

However, you never really know if it’s going to rain or not until you stick your head out the window. In part 2 of this 2 part series, going to concentrate on Tim Cook. It all comes down to who’s the captain of the ship.

Is the Customer Always Right?
Last week, I talked a bit about why the late Steve Jobs hated the idea of a 7″ iPad. Put succinctly, Jobs felt it confused customers by blurring the lines too much between the iPod Touch and the original, 9.7″ iPad. Customers interested in that device size might be better served with the (we’ll call it) 4″ iPod Touch or by taking the plunge and moving up to the full 9.7″ screen on the iPad.

In a Jobs run Apple, there would be no ‘7″ iPad Mini.’ The game totally changes in an Apple run by Tim Cook. Here’s why…

Tim Cook is Apple’s former Chief Operating Officer. As an operations guy, Tim Cook listens to, or is at least accustomed to listening to, the voice of the customer. Customers clearly like the idea of a 7″ iOS tablet. The idea of a lighter smaller iPad, with all of its power and capabilities, appeals to a great many people.

The product confusion issues between an (about) 4″ iPod Touch, 7″ iPad Mini, and the 9.7″ iPad still exist – Is the 7″ iOS device a iPod that’s too big, or an iPad that’s too small..? The question is valid, as the iPod Touch does very well, and the iPad is currently expected to be the king of the “tablet hill” until at least 2016.

Tim Cook is the unknown element here. His good friend and confidante, Steve Jobs was very clear on his 7″ tablet stance – No. However, Tim Cook’s operations background may move him to green light the project; but you have to ask how that will effect Apple’s bottom line (manufacturing and marketing costs vs. potential sales, for example) before you start drooling over the idea of an iPad that you can carry in a jacket pocket.

I’ve been wrong before, but at the end of the day, I still don’t think we’re going to get a 7″ iOS tablet; but not because of Jobs’ product aesthetics stance. I don’t think the device has enough legs to warrant the manufacturing line and component costs.

However, we’re really going to have to wait and see… I wouldn’t be the first Apple prognosticator to be wrong about what Apple actually decides to do if they did release a 7″ iPad.

Related Posts:

7″ iPad Rumor Analysis – Part 1: Why Jobs Hated the iPad Mini

There’s are reasons why Apple hasn’t released the rumored iPad Mini. Let’s break it down…

Apple rumors are fun. Apple’s secretive culture often sparks and breeds the development of rumors and many people in the tech journalism industry love to speculate and see how right the mill is every time Apple releases new products. Last minute speculations aside, it’s difficult to crack the Apple rumor nut. However, after slowly and carefully finishing the Steve Jobs Biography, I think I have a decent understanding of where Steve was wanting things with Apple Product Development to go.

I’ve had a couple people come to me over the past couple of weeks and either ask me about or tell me about the rumored 7″ iPad, nicknamed the “iPad Mini,” that Apple is supposedly set to release “soon.” I’ve chuckled a bit at these folks and their immediate response was, “What..? You don’t think they’re going to release it?”

My response has been, “I don’t know.”

Trying to guess what Apple is going to do with their product road map is very much like trying to predict the weather – there’s gonna be some [weather]; and forecasters have a 50-50 chance of being right.

However, you never really know if it’s going to rain or not until you stick your head out the window. In this 2 part series, I’m going to look at two deciding factors related to Apple’s “iPad Mini.” Part 1 will concentrate on Steve Jobs. Part 2 is going to concentrate on Tim Cook. It all comes down to who’s the captain of the ship.

Why Jobs Hated the iPad Mini

It’s a very well-known fact that Steve Jobs thought the iPad’s form-factor was perfect as is. In his estimation, around 10 inches was the right and ideal size for this size computing platform. Netbooks, which the iPad was originally thought to be when Apple was originally developing the iPad, fragment the computing landscape and muck with the ecosystem. As such, you really don’t see a lot of netbooks on the market today. That computing form has really died off. They’re too under powered, and too small to be of any real use.

At 7 inches, an iOS powered tablet sticks itself directly between the 3.7 (let’s call it 4 inches for the sake of argument) iPod Touch and the iPad. Jobs looked at this middle sized form factor and pronounced it a “piece of shit,” because it brought confusion, more than value, to iOS devices. Most people don’t understand why, and it took me to get through the Walter Isaacson biography to really get it myself.

I am almost positive that Apple put a 7″ iPad prototype together. I’m certain that there was likely more than one; and that they got passed around Jobs’ and Jony Ivy’s inner circles. Jobs killed it because it too closely blurred the lines between the 4″ iPod Touch and the 9.7″ iPad.

Ultimately, it would have cannibalized sales of both existing products, without adding any additional value or features. Jobs thought 7 inches was too small of a screen to accommodate a tablet and its use cases (games, movies, etc.) and too big to carry around as an iPod. (Face, it, you’re not going to go jogging with a 7″ device strapped to your arm.) When trying to determine which device to purchase, customers wouldn’t understand the differences between the iPod and the iPad (Mini) at that point, and from what I’ve read in Isaacson’s biography, that drove Steve bonkers.

Come back next time, and I’ll go into the other side of the coin – Tim Cook.

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