FEATURE REVIEW – Apple Watch – Part 4

Introduction

Wearables are a huge deal today. In fact, it’s one of the hottest growing computing categories on the market right now. Nearly every place you look and every person you actually look AT has some kind of wearable tech with them. Smartwatches and fitness bands seem to the easiest to spot, and nearly everyone at the office is wearing one, too.

Perhaps the biggest and most anticipated entry into the wearables/ smartwatch category is the Apple Watch. Is it the nirvana of wearables? Is it everything that its hyped up to be? Was it worth the wait? These are all GREAT questions.

The Apple Watch is a much anticipated, much sought after wearable. In part one, I took a look at the hardware specifically. In part two, I took a look at usability. In part three, I took a look at the Watch’s software, both on the Watch and on the iPhone.

In part four of this four part review, I’m gonna wrap it all up – given the way the Watch works, is it the right device for you? Is it worth the investment? Will it last, or is it just a flash in the pan?

Is the Apple Watch the device for you? Let’s get into how it does what it does and find out!

Apple_Watch_official_logo.svg

Problems and Issues

Part 1 Conclusion Summary
The hardware is the thing!

You need to know what you’re buying, what options are available and how much the thing costs. Understanding what you have to work with before you get into what it does and how it does it can often help you figure out if there’s value in it for you.

The Watch is expensive. Apple branded watch bands are outrageously expensive… but man, some of them are really good looking.

Part 2 Conclusion Summary
Notifications need work.

Apple can do a lot here without reworking too much. They need to stop data coming over to the watch for notifications that are turned off, and they need provide a bit more control for the user.

Bluetooth connectivity is a bit of a challenge. The Bluetooth microphone needs help. Using either it or the speaker to make and place calls or listen to any kind of audio on the Watch is difficult. In “appropriate” locations, like an outdoor venue, the sound from the Watch is easily lost to background noise.

Part 3 Conclusion Summary

Big issues here were issues calculating and explaining the difference between active and resting calories. Most everyone is going to come from some other kind of fitness band exposure. Many of them, Fitbit and Microsoft Band included, don’t differentiate between the two. To them calories are calories. The Watch also isn’t as customizable as I had hoped. I’m hoping that WatchOS2.0 will bring more customization and software improvement with Apple Health and Activity on the iPhone as well as their counterparts on the Watch.

General Apple Watch Problems and Issues
Aside from other issues that I’ve listed so far – some of which are considerable – let’s face it… the biggest hurdle that Apple Watch has to get past is cost. The device appeals to nearly everyone with an iPhone. In fact, I don’t know anyone with an iPhone that doesn’t WANT an Apple Watch. However, the Watch itself is expensive, and the bands are simply outrageously priced. I have details on those, in the Hardware section of this review.

Skin Reactions to Rubber/ Silicone
I’ve been wearing the Apple Watch Sport for a little over three (3) months now. I have to say that I am very pleased with the way the Fluoroelastomer band has been wearing on my wrist. I have to this date had no adverse reaction to the band at all. Honestly, I’m really very surprised.

I had issues with the silicone band on the Fitbit Surge. In fact, I found myself removing it a few times to scratch and try to get rid of the dry, flakey skin, and to apply some kind of cream to it to help stop the itching. I haven’t had any issues like that with the Fluoroelastomer band on the Apple Watch; and honestly, I’m surprised. I actually expected to have problems because the Watch requires near constant skin contact to stay unlocked and working properly.

I’ve been wearing the Watch rather tight on my wrist with the Fluoroelastomer band in part because of the skin contact needs for locking and Apple Pay as well as heart monitor readings. I tend to like to wear my watches rather loose, more like a bracelet than anything else. However, I don’t have a metal band yet that really facilitates that style just yet. I also didn’t want to mess up any sensor readings during the extended review I’ve been working on.

Conclusion
First, let me say this – I love the Apple Watch. I use it every day. Now… let’s get down to brass tacks.

The Apple Watch is in no way an essential piece of hardware for anyone.

Period.

It’s a huge First World benefit; and that’s about it. It’s a great convenience provider, if you feel you’re in your iPhone too much; or would simply like to be in it a bit less, especially in meetings at the office. You’ll find that you definitely take your iPhone out to use it a great deal less than you used to… unless you’re a huge gamer, and then maybe not as much… but most people will find that they use their and check their iPhone less when they have the Watch. It’s great for managing iPhone notifications.

However, the Apple Watch is expensive. Everything about it is expensive. If you remember, I got the 42mm Space Gray Sport. It’s got a anodized aluminum case and a black Fluoroelastomer band; and it was still over $470 with tax. That’s the ENTRY level Watch in the 42mm size. You can buy a Mac Mini for about as much…

Let me be very clear – I love the Apple Watch. However, its WAY overpriced.

The Branded band options aren’t all that great. While they’re interchangeable, those are ALSO grossly overpriced. Fifty ($50) bucks for a rubber watch band is totally outrageous. … And don’t even get me started on the Link Bracelet. NO watch band, no matter how well designed or how good looking or comfortable to wear is worth $500 bucks on its own, especially one made of stainless steel. The market segment that that band is targeted to will pay that much, but I honestly think they can’t afford to, in all reality. The 42mm Apple Watch (not the Sport or Edition… this is the stainless steel version in either black or silver) with the Link Bracelet is $1100… and that’s before tax!

If you’re looking for additional bands and don’t want to spend a lot, check out Click, a Watch band adapter designed specifically for Apple Watch. With these, you can use any 22mm band you can find, and they’re totally interchangeable with other bands, so you’re not stuck with anything.

The Apple Watch handles notifications very, VERY well, but if you remember my Fitbit Surge review, I totally lambasted the device for sending over information from my iPhone to the device, even when the notifications are turned off. While its slightly different here, the same rule applies to the Apple Watch.

Off is off, guys; but unfortunately, while you can modify individual notifications, you can’t turn them off. What’s up with that?! You’re trying to tell me that after paying $17,000 for a Watch (it has the same hardware components as the Sport, just a different case, you can’t turn off the notifications you don’t want to receive and stop the data from being sent to the device? That seems a bit odd, don’t you think?

Here’s something interesting to think about – From a functionality perspective, the Microsoft Band does nearly EVERYTHING that the Apple Watch does… nearly EVERYTHING (except payments and the cutesy stuff…) and its nearly $300 cheaper compared to the Apple Watch Sport. If you’re looking for a fitness band that’s also a smartwatch but don’t have the dollars for an Apple Watch, Microsoft Band might be the way to go.

If however, you’ve got your mind and heart set on an Apple Watch, you’re going to need to make certain you understand what you’re buying and the associated costs with it. It’s a great tool, but due to cost and the limitations of WatchOS 1.x, you may find that you might want to wait until WatchOS 2.0 is released, until the cost comes down or until new hardware is released.

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