Advanced Password Manager

Keep your PII (personally identifying information) safe and private with this important Windows utility.

image-01-100x100In an age where nearly EVERYONE is getting hacked, it’s important to keep all of your sensitive information, private. This is increasingly difficult, as most nearly every privacy utility out on the market concentrates on nearly the same things – web browsing history, passwords, advertisement blocking and cookie management. However, nearly none of them cover PII or personally identifying information. That is, until Advanced Password Manager. It’s a must have utility for your Windows PC.

There’s a reason why you have data on your PC. You need it for work, shop, surf, etc. However, a lot – or most of it – is at risk for loss. Advanced Password Manager identifies, saves and deletes traces of your identity from your computer system after saving them to an encrypted vault secured by one master password. After your information is saved, Advanced Password Manager enables you to fill web forms, including personal and financial information, automatically using your saved credentials.

Advanced Password Manager securely locks your personal and financial information with a master key. You generally have to remember multiple passwords for your accounts and unfortunately, using the same password for all your accounts is unsecure and unsafe. If someone obtains that one password, all your accounts will likely be hacked without your notice. The best way to remain safe, is to have a different, secure password for each online resource you use.

The application allows you to do all of the following:

  1. Protect all your passwords,
  2. Auto-fill login credentials using Advanced Password Manager’s add-on,
  3. Securely save your online accounts,
  4. Sync passwords, credit card details and more, over browsers and
  5. Generate strong passwords.

Advanced Password Manager lets you remember only one password to unlock all your accounts.

Advanced_Password_Manager_Review

Advanced Password Manager can scan your PC for PII and then can clean it in three (3) steps

  1. Scan: Scan your PC for existing identity traces that can be stolen from your PC.
  2. Vault: Save these scanned traces to your vault and lock it using your master key.
  3. Clean: Remove scanned identity traces from your PC to stay safe & secure.

 

Advanced Password Manager is a fine addition to any PC owner’s utility box. This app should be part of everyone’s security arsenal, along with a top rated antivirus app and a good ad blocker. While the app pulls all of your PII off your machine, it secures all of your data on its own secure web servers. Your best bet here is to insure that your master password contains not only upper and lower case letters, but numbers and special characters as well.

The app stays resident on your PC and installs plug-ins to the most popular browsers – IE, Chrome and Firefox – so that it can prefill credential fields and manage other secure data while you surf the internet.

I like the app a great deal, if only because it scans for and removes data that no other privacy app that I’ve ever come across does. Aside from an odd help-related fly out that won’t stop flying out no matter how many times you put it away, this app is a great addition to your security toolbox.

Donwload Advanced Password Manager

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WhatsApp Blocked in Brazil due to Criminal Case

Facebook won’t turn over data, so a judge shut it down…

whatsapp-logo-iconeA Brazilian judge has blocked Facebook’s WhatsApp from operation inside the country and has authorized a fine of up to R$50,000 ($15,273 USD) per day while Facebook refuses to comply with a secret judicial order to provide data in a criminal case, according to Reuters. This is apparently the third such incident involving the popular IP-based messaging app since December of 2015.

The judicial order is officially being kept secret, according to Reuters; and is speculated to be related to conversations involving a number of drug trafficking cases currently under investigation. This action, however, appears to be severe, as its open ended. WhatsApp has been shut down indefinitely, and the outage affects more than 100 million Brazilian users.

WhatsApp is popular in Brazil and other countries due to steep local cellular carrier fees.

The big issue here is that WhatsApp’s data is encrypted. This case is similar to the recent case here in the US between Apple and the FBI. The Brazilian government wants to know what information was traded between suspects and is expecting WhatsApp to provide the unencrypted data.

Unfortunately, there’s a problem with the order(s) coming from the office of Brazilian Judge Baniela Barbosa Assunção de Souza from the state of Rio de Janeiro – Facebook doesn’t store the encrypted data on their servers,

“As we’ve said in the past, we cannot share information we don’t have access to. We hope to see this block lifted as soon as possible,” said a WhatsApp spokesperson in a public statement.

Brazil’s attorney general’s office has restated its position that judges who suspend WhatsApp for failure to provide data are incorrectly interpreting a 2014 law meant to provide a legal framework for the internet.

Brazil has five (5) major cellular carriers: Telefonica Brasil SA, América Móvil SAB’s Claro, TIM Participações SA, Oi SA and Nextel Participações SA. None of them had an immediate comment regarding this suspension.

I think they are waiting for either the other shoe to drop or for a higher judicial authority to lift the suspension. Since the nation’s attorney general doesn’t support this type of suspension, I suspect that it won’t last very long, and that any fine levied against Facebook/ WhatsApp will be negated, but we’ll have to wait and see.

What are your thoughts on this development? Should WhatsApp provide any information at all? Should they show the judge that they don’t have the messages? Why don’t you give me your thoughts in the discussion area below and tell me what you think?

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Blackberry is Dead

Blackberry has killed the Blackberry Classic

blackberryI’ve been decrying this the 2011-2012 timeframe, I think. Honestly, I’m really very surprised the company has held out as long as it has, but based on what’s just happened, the company is over and it needs to hang up its mobile devices (read; cleats).

In recent news, Blackberry has discontinued its Blackberry classic – the last current handset in the world running Blackberry OS. Instead, the firm has decided on the following strategy, according to their COO and GM for mobile devices, Ralph Pini,

We are committed to the success of both BlackBerry 10 and Android devices. To keep innovating and advancing…we are updating our smartphone lineup with state of the art devices… The Classic has long surpassed the average lifespan for a smartphone… We are ready for this change so we can give our customers something better — entrenched in our legacy in security and pedigree in making the most productive smartphones.

What this translates to is that Blackberry is releasing one Android phone every quarter, for the next three quarters.

  • Q3-2016: Neon
    This budget based phone should hit the streets in July-August 2016
  • Q4-2016: Argon
    This mid-range phone should be available in October 2016
  • Q1-2017: Mercury
    This upper mid-range phone should be available at the start of 2017 and is rumored to have a physical keyboard

While Blackberry – SAYS – it’s still committed to the success of both Blackberry 10 and Android devices, its immediate strategy doesn’t appear to include any native phones. In other words, I wouldn’t expect any, any time soon. This really makes Blackberry nothing more than yet another mediocre Android phone OEM, and with the devices they show above… I don’t expect them to do very well in the coming three quarters, regardless of price. Mid-range to low end Android devices don’t a lot of business in the enterprise. Those folks want flagship class phones. The market that does want affordable Android devices – emerging and “third world” markets – don’t want enterprise messaging services.

Back in the day, RIM – now called Blackberry – ruled the roost as the mobile device king, fighting off both Microsoft and Palm. Now, 12 – 14 years after their hay day, they’re just another company hanging on, trying to find a way to stay alive and remain relevant while continuing to rely on to IP and paradigms that just don’t resonate with today’s markets.

Are you or your company still using Blackberries? If not now, and you did previously, when did you stop? Do you feel that Blackberry has a chance at continued survival, or are they in an unstoppable death spiral? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this issue. Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area below, and give me your thoughts?

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Is Pokemon Go Really Malware?

The application does some things that are setting off all kinds of alarms over here…

pokemon goWhen you have young kids, it’s hard to keep them away from all of the latest fads and trending stuff. They hear about from a friend who’s either tried it, got it or seen it, and then they feel they have to try it too, or be left out of the fun. This is the lure of Pokémon Go, and its taking the country and perhaps the world, by storm.

The game was released a few days ago as of this writing, and it’s become very popular. Scores of players are walking around, head down in their smartphone’s screen, searching for Pokémon to collect and for other players to battle. When players come to a monument, statue or other type of local landmark – called a Pokestop in the game – they can meet up, battle and play together thanks to the app using geolocation and a local GPS map of the area. Players can also drop a “virtual beacon” to attract and draw other players to their location.

Many people are doing just that… and then robbing players at gunpoint. It’s been all over the news.

But let’s put that aside for a moment… the game has a much larger problem and poses what I believe is much more real and more serious threat than bumping into “Bonnie and Clyde” at a Pokestop near you. The game poses a serious security threat to users who log in with their Google Accounts.

The game seems innocent enough. It’s a free download from the App Store or from the Google Play Store and uses in-app purchases to generate revenue. It’s a common enough model that’s proven profitable for a number of different game developers. However, the biggest problem I’ve seen is with the way the app handles Google Accounts.

Every time I’ve tried to create a “Pokémon Go” account on the developer’s website, it says that the website is overloaded and that users should try again in an hour. This is a condition that hasn’t changed since the game was released. The other option you’re given is to log in with your Google Account. That will usually get you in and to chasing Pokémon up and down the street. However, you need to understand a few things about what happens with you log into Pokémon Go with your Google Account.

  1. You Give it Full Access to your Google Account
    This means it has access to EVERYTHING in your Google Account. It has access to and can read all of your email. It has access to all of your passwords. It has access to all of your credit cards stored in your Google Account. It can even change the passwords and security settings on that account, with the full access you give it. It can take your credit cards, with the CVV’s and go on a shopping spree if it wants… And YOU authorized it, just to get access to the game. Nice, huh?
  2. The Game’s Privacy Policy Considers Your Personal Data a Business Asset
    The privacy policy explicitly states that the data it collects, including PII (personally identifying information – like your credit card or other sensitive data) is a business asset. This means that it can sell the data, and that if the company goes under or is acquired by a third party, your PII goes along with the sale. You have no control over this, since you gave the game full access to your Google Account.

There is one thing that you can do to “protect” yourself. I found this in a ZDNet article, and the procedure outlined at the end of the article works; but there’s a catch. I’ll get to that in a moment…

If you wish to play the game and don’t want Niantic (the game manufacturer) to have full access to your Google Account, you can revoke that access by following these steps:

  1. Log into your Google Account and go to the Apps Connected to Your Account page.
  2. Find “Pokémon Go” in the app list, and click on it.
  3. Click the Remove Access button.
  4. When prompted, click the OK button to revoke full access.

Please Note: After you do this, Pokémon Go won’t have ANY kind of access to your Google account; but there’s no guarantee that they didn’t ultimately mine out all of your intimate PII (personally identifying information) out of your account before you revoked its access.

However, this is where that catch comes in – I’ve noticed that when you do this, the app stops working.

You’re fine for the one session you’ve got, but if you quit the app, or push it to the background, you lose access to the game. The only way I’ve been able to get it working again is to either delete the app and set it up again; or to wait for the app to fault and then present you with the game setup process, including logging in with your Google Account, again. Game play and progress appears to be preserved across reaccessing/ resetting up the game. You don’t have to REcatch ’em all.

Niantic says that the iOS version of Pokémon Go erroneously requires full access to your Google Account. However, I haven’t seen anything about them correcting the problem with a new version of the app. Strangely, the Android version doesn’t do this. Logging in with a Google Account there, provides Pokémon Go with an appropriate level of access to your Google Account.

This whole situation really bothers me… Many times, iOS users don’t seem to have a way to create a Pokémon Trainer Club account. The game says that the website is overwhelmed and it won’t let you create an account or play the game. What you don’t see, is that the rest of the site doesn’t act like it’s on an overloaded web server. Its performance is really very good.

Stranger still is that after you log in with a Google Account, performance of the game is very good, too. If the game’s website and web servers were overwhelmed with as many new account requests and game play as is being alluded to, it would show up in game performance. It doesn’t.

I think Pokémon Go is the biggest Trojan horse in the world…and everyone is giving it exactly what it wants – all of your credit card info, all pf your PII, and access to your entire (Google catered) life, which it can sell to the highest bidder whenever it wants. And we’re doing it on purpose. Game players are either completely duped or just don’t seem to care…

I am deleting the game from my iPhone. I don’t need to catch ’em all… and honestly, you don’t either, especially if you don’t want your identity stolen. Prove me wrong, Niantic…! I dare you. Prove me wrong.

UPDATE: Several hours after submitting this story for publication, Niantic posted an update to the application that reduces Google Account, account access to the Basic level, only wanting to know your name and your email address. This is definitely a step in the right direction…

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Unboxing the Star Trek Original Series Communicator

If you’re a Star Trek fan, then you’re going to want to see this…

About a year ago, I got wind of a new prop replica and after seeing it, I had to have one. I’m a huge Trekkie, and honestly, this was just a little too difficult to resist. The closest I ever got to a Star Trek Communicator when I was a kid was one of these…

Communicator Walkie Talkie

The walkie talkies I got as a kid, weren’t very authentic. They were blue. They were made of plastic, and they didn’t work very well. However, for a ten-year-old in 1975, they were totally awesome.

As you can see from the unboxing video and from the photos below, this is TOTALLY different. The device is truly authentic. It’s got the right type of metal casing, with the correct die cast pattern on the casing. It has the gold tone grill antenna, flashing jewels and actuator buttons.

The device is a fully functional, Bluetooth handset. When paired with your smartphone, it can make and place calls, and even act as a Bluetooth audio speaker for your favorite music or video.

The battery life on this thing is (supposed to be) pretty decent. I’ve had it for a few weeks at this point, and after its initial charge, it hasn’t run out of power just yet. Though to be very honest, I haven’t used it too extensively. It’s been hugely fun to play with, but I don’t want to damage or ruin it…

You can see a number of still pictures of the device and its contents, below. As you can see from the shots, is correctly sized and proportioned, and the sounds, make it all that much more fun that you’d think.

IMG_5535 IMG_5536 IMG_5537 IMG_5538
The front of the box The back of the box. Notice all of the detailed specs and information The Communicator’s collector’s box The faux leather case
IMG_5539 IMG_5540 IMG_5541
The open Communicator’s Collector case The contents of the collector’s case. The open Communicator Kirk to Enterprise..!

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Another Day… Another Virus (Backdoor.MAC.Elanor)

This one targets Mac systems. Heads up Apple users…!

As Macs and macOS become more and more mainstream, more and more virus and malware authors are going to be writing code that targets computers coming out of Cupertino. Case in point – a new piece of malware has been encountered in the wild, allowing attackers to hijack a Mac user’s machine.

backdoorThe new malware has been named Backdoor.MAC.Elanor by researchers at Bitdefender. The software installs a backdoor onto an infected Mac that provides full access to a Mac user’s data, and full control over their web cam. The malware has been traced to the installation of an app called Easy Doc Converter.app.

Easy Doc Converter is a fake file conversion app that is apparently available from reputable download sites across the internet. The app installs a component that provides remote, anonymous access of an infected system’s command and control center. Additional components allow attackers to view, edit, rename, delete, upload, download and archive/copy off files from infected systems. They also have elevated privileges that allow them to execute commands and scripts.

This particular bit of malware allows attackers to watch computer users at their workstations via the computer’s web cam. Attackers make use of an included tool called “wacaw” to capture stills and video from infected systems, according to Bitdefender.

Thankfully, the app isn’t digitally signed with an approved Apple security cert, so if you’ve got Gatekeeper enabled (and don’t disable it, trying to install Easy Doc Converter…) you won’t get infected.

As more and more malware targets Macs, you’d be hard pressed not to find and install a decent malware scanner for your Mac. Thankfully, Soft32 has more than one good AV scanner for Mac on the site, including BitDefender Antivirus for Mac 2016.

Since they’re the ones that broke the news on this new malware, they will likely also be the first with removal instructions should you find yourself infected. If you suspect this is the case, installing this app should be your first step.

If you find that you have Backdoor.MAC.Elanor, I’d appreciate hearing from you. Please leave a comment below in the Discussion area for this column and let us know where you found the Easy Doc Converter app and if you’ve been able to get rid of the malware.

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Apple to Acquire Tidal?

Apple may acquire the streaming service to obtain exclusive content…

tidalstreamingmusic

I’ve seen a number of reports on the internet about Apple being interested or in talks to acquire the music streaming service, Tidal. For those that remember, Tidal was setup by Jay-Z, as in Beyoncé and Jay-Z, so yeah… Them.

The talks are reported to be exploratory and may not result in a deal; but Apple appears to be serious. It also doesn’t hurt that Tidal is in a huge money crunch, and Jay-Z may get his butt out of the financial fire if this turns out to be true and the acquisition goes through.

However, according to sources reported by the Wall Street Journal, a Tidal spokesman said that Tidal executives had not held talks with Apple, and the terms of any deal are unknown.

This would not be the first music company that Apple has purchased. They purchased Beats from Dr. Dre in 2014. However, Tidal is the first artist owned streaming service, and as I said, it has exclusive content from Beyoncé, Jay-Z and Prince. Music from these artists was removed from Apple Music (and Spotify, for that matter) about a year ago in July of 2015. Tidal currently has 4.2 million paying subscribers.

Apple is looking to expand its presence in the music industry. Since it acquired Beats in 2014, its launched its own streaming service in Apple Music and will be making important modifications to it with the release of iOS 10 later in the Fall of 2016.

Tidal has streaming agreements with Bea, J, and The Artist, as well as artists like Kanye and Madonna. Apple seriously wants a chunk of the streaming pie, and has been pushing to acquire rights to exclusive and original content for Apple Music and its 15M+ paying subscribers.

I’m not certain why streaming is the big deal that it is. There’s only one carrier that I know of right now that is offering a current, non-grandfathered unlimited data plan, and that’s AT&T, provided you have them for mobile service AND are also a DirecTV customer. If you are, AT&T’s unlimited everything, everything plan is truly the way to go. It makes everything way cheap.

However, unless you have that plan – and most people don’t – mobile bandwidth can be expensive, especially if you eat through yours streaming music and video content all day long. While Wi-Fi will help you here, Wi-Fi is not ubiquitous, and as such, you’re likely to burn through your bandwidth very quickly and get hit with overage charges unless, of course, you buy a big streaming package for your phone, and then… things can get expensive.

I don’t know why streaming is the thing. It might be because paid streaming subscriptions make finding new music economically affordable. However, after you find it and you download it, you’re leasing it. Once the subscription is gone, you can’t listen to it any more. You can’t burn downloaded subscription content to a CD, kids…

Are you a music streaming service subscriber? Do you have issues with your monthly allotment of mobile data every month? Join me in the Discussion area and let me know what you think of this deal and what it might mean to music streaming subscribers.

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Rooting the HTC 10

If you truly want to make it your own…

Introduction
There are legitimate reasons for rooting an Android device. They aren’t all about custom ROM’s and the like. And since its now LEGAL to jailbreak devices, some of the sexy and taboo has gone out of the game and for some – me included – its now often more hassle than its worth.

However, there are often some good reasons for rooting an Android device that go beyond the desire for a custom ROM. Some of those reasons speak to the need for a backup app like, Titanium Backup. Besides, it’s been a while since I’ve jail broken or rooted any kind of smartphone. I wanted to give it a try…

Improved Rooting Process
To be very blunt, I’ve always owned either a Nexus or HTC Android Phone. My daughter had a brief dalliance with the Samsung Galaxy (1) smartphone a number of years back, but that proved to be a bit challenging when it came to customization. It also cured her of any interest in Android as I recall, as a matter of fact.

Rooting and customizing an Android device is NOT an easy process. However, in the seven or so years that I’ve been looking into it, it has gotten a LOT easier. The process used to involve invoking commands that ran a process and then invoked a known security hole. Once invoked, the process that you ran was “broken,” leaving you with access that had elevated privileges where you could then run commands that made those privileges permanent. Once that happened, you could unlock the bootloader (if locked and needed to be unlocked), install a better recovery partition and SU (or Super User) that made root access system wide.

Doing all of those things in the right order, at the right TIMES, wasn’t easy. In many cases you might have to perform some steps multiple times, or depending on how things worked, you may even brick your device. I know I had more than one harrowing moment where I thought I had bricked more than one device. I have been fortunate, however, NOT to have had that happen. I’ve always been able to get a wayward (or device that I thought I had bricked) back. However, this is a REAL issue, so, hence, the following notice:

WARNING – Rooting your Android device involves modifying some very key and deep system level settings and files. It (can, and likely will) void your warranty. It may also brick your device and make it permanently unusable if things turn sideways. You do any and ALL of it at your own risk, and neither I nor Soft32 sanction, suggest or encourage you to undertake these activities. No offer of warranty is expressed or implied. You move forward with any of this AT YOUR OWN RISK. Period.

Full instructions can be found on this easy to follow video. Please note that the instructions are for a Windows system. If you use a Mac or Linux system, you will need to sub in the appropriate tools (like Terminal, etc.)

The video is just under 15 minutes in length and should be easy enough for nearly anyone and everyone to follow, provided you’re familiar using the Windows Command Prompt. I’m not going to go over everything here, despite the step-by-step stuff you’re going to see, largely because the video is really very, VERY good; and because there are a LOT of How to Root articles and videos available for the HTC 10. However, there are some specific things that I do want to touch on and say.

Process
The process is fairly simple, but you’ll need to complete everything in order. You can start and stop if needed, but you should complete each of the noted steps in full before stopping. It’s not recommended that you start and stop unless you really know what you’re doing. The entire process will likely take you two to three (2-3) hours, especially if you’re new to this, so again, make sure you watch the video and have everything you need before you start.

1. Gather the software
2. Prep the device
3. Unlock the bootloader
4. Install the Recovery Image
5. Install SuperSU

Gather the Software
You’ll need the following tools. Links are not provided here. These are readily and freely available all over the internet. Please make certain you have everything that you need before you start and that each title has all of the required files.

This is especially true for Fastboot and ADB. I had to download the software separately, as I couldn’t find the software with all of the same files in it as described in the video. Take your time. Get all the files, as you will need a fully functioning Fastboot in order to do this.
1. Fastboot
2. TWRP 3.0.2.1 (or greater) recovery image
3. SuperSU v2.68 or greater
4. ADB
5. Android SDK
6. HTC Driver 4.10.0.001.msi (or greater)

Device Prep
You don’t need to do a lot here, but this stuff is important.

Developer Mode
This process is documented, like, nowhere. Or at least it isn’t documented anywhere any regular user would learn about it or find it. However, without this stuff, you’re never going to be able to get the job done.

Go to Settings – About – Software Information – More. Tap on the build number 10-15 times (or more) until the device tells you that Developer Mode has been enabled. This will enable other device communication options in Settings that you will need to check in order to root the device.

Go to Settings – Developer Options (this is a new option that appears after the above is done). Turn on OEM Unlocking. This will give you the permissions to actually go through the process of unlocking the boot loader.

Power off the device. The next step is unlocking the bootloader. Make certain you’ve got all the software you need downloaded and installed before moving forward. It will make things a lot easier, and you won’t have to start and stop with some of the things as you see in the video.

Unlocking the Bootloader
You’re going to need Fastboot for this, and you’ll need to work from a command prompt in this section. Again, watch the video, as it will take you step by step through the entire process, and it will show you the exact screens you will see while doing all of this.

Again, I’m abbreviating this process, so, please, watch the video. Though the author does initially make a mistake about this section and then corrects himself.

Connect the device to your USB cable. Turn your device back on, but when doing so, press and hold both the power button and the volume down button until you see the HTC logo. You’re going to be put into bootloader mode. The bootloader will state that its locked, and you’ll see a split screen display.

After you have your device connected to your PC via USB cable, the device booted to the bootloader and Fastboot can see it, you’re going to get a identifier token from the device that you will then enter into a special page on the HTC website.

With the HTC10 connected to your system, open a Command Prompt window and change the directory to where ever you have Fastboot installed. Once in that directory, type the following command into the Command Prompt window and press enter:

Fastboot oem get_identifier_token

Fastboot get Token

This will return a huge string of numbers that will display in the Command Prompt window. You will need to use the Copy-Paste function out of the DOS window to grab everything from

<<<< Identifier Token Start >>>>

to

<<<< Identifier Token End >>>>

including those banner lines.

Fastboot Retrieve Token

You will then need to go to HTCDev.com and create an account. After creating your free account and logging in, click the Unlock Bootloader icon. Follow the links. When you get to the Unlock Bootloader page, you’ll follow these instructions:

1. Click the device dropdown
2. Select HTC 10 from the supported device list
3. Click the Begin Unlock Bootloader button
4. Click Yes on the, “Are you sure…?” dialog
5. Click the checkboxes on the Legal Terms dialog
6. Click the Proceed to Unlock Instructions button
7. Follow the instructions on page 1 of the unlock instructions page. (It also contains links to Fastboot, if you don’t have it; and will also show you how to retrieve your Identifier Token. You can breeze through this, as you’ve already got Fastboot AND the token by this point, if you’re following the video…)
8. Click the Proceed to Step 5 button
9. Scroll to the bottom of the second page of the process. It’s here where you’ll paste in the Identifier.
10. Click the Submit button

Get Unlock Token

You’ll be emailed a file that you’ll use to unlock the bootloader of your phone. You’ll use Fastboot for this. You’ll need to save the file that HTC emails you, Unlock_code.bin, to your Fastboot directory and then type this command in the DOS window and then press enter:

Fastboot flash unlocktoken Unlock_code.bin

Once flashed, reboot your device. It will rebuild itself. Go back to the bootloader and it should read that it is now unlocked, but your device isn’t rooted yet.

Install the Recovery Image
At some point, you should have downloaded a copy of the TWRP recovery image. This is an image file of a new recovery image that will give you a number of different options that are more advanced than the recovery image that comes with your HTC 10. It will make installing the last part of this process – SuperSU – a lot easier and will also allow you to install custom ROM images that may become available for the HTC 10.

Follow this process to install the recovery image.

  1. Copy twrp-3.0.2-2ppme.img to your Fastboot folder
  2. At the DOS prompt window, while still in the Fastboot directory, type the command:
    Fastboot flash recovery twrp-3.0.2-2ppme.img. The file will copy over to the device.
  3. On your device, hit the power key to reboot to bootloader
  4. This will bring up the device’s actual bootloader.
  5. Press the down volume button until Boot to Recovery mode is selected on your phone and then press the power button. This will activate TWRP Recovery.
  6. Press the cancel button on the device.
  7. Keep everything read only.
  8. Press the Wipe button
  9. Press the Format Data button
  10. When prompted, type the word, “yes”. This will format the Data partition on your device.
  11. Once complete, tap Reboot, then tap Bootloader. The device screen will quickly flash and put you back in the white bootloader screen.
  12. Press the volume down button until you get to Reboot to Recovery mode. Press the power button. This will put you back in the TWRP recovery screen.

Next, proceed to the Install SuperSU section. You’re device still isn’t rooted. The next section, accomplishes this.

Install SuperSU
Please remember that you shouldn’t do this lightly. It’s at this point, that you will be able to raise the privileges on your device and actually root it.

  1. In the TWRP recovery screen, swipe to allow modifications.
  2. On your PC, go back to the folder that you downloaded SuperSU to and right click it. Click Copy from the context menu.
  3. Find your device in the Windows Explorer window’s left pain and click on it. Double click to open the internal storage.
  4. Copy the ZIP file to your device’s internal storage.
  5. Back on the device, tap the Install button and select SuperSU from the screen that displays.
  6. Swipe to install.
  7. Once that installs, tap the reboot button

Your device will completely wipe and reboot itself. You’ll need to go through the full setup process again. When all is done, tap the app tray folder icon to show all the apps that are on your device.
Find the SuperSU icon and tap on it. If you don’t get any errors, you’re all set.

Conclusion
There’s a lot here; and I honestly went into more detail and actual how-to than I had originally planned. However, better safe than sorry.

Again, watch the video. Its short, very informative and it’s VERY easy to follow.

If you’re HTC 10 was carrier unlocked (like mine was, directly from HTC) unlocking the bootloader and rooting the device won’t necessarily void your warranty. However, for devices locked to any specific carrier, like either Verizon Wireless or to AT&T, then you may void your warranty if you do this.

Are you an Android fan? Do you have an HTC 10; and if so, did you root it? Why don’t you join me in the discussion area and let me know your thoughts on the process and of your results.

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