Olio Releases Model One Firmware Updates 1.1.71

Well… At least they’re making an effort…

DlAmpsIrIf you recall, my review of the Olio Model One wasn’t very flattering. I still think its problematic, and something that most people probably should wait on purchasing. However… they ARE trying; and for that, their grades are improving. Recently, you may recall, they released a firmware update. Well, Olio has released another firmware update, updating their Model One to version 1.1.71.

Version 1.1.70 was released on 2016-01-22. Version 1.1.71 was released on 2016-01-23. Olio again caught a bug, post release, and followed it up with a quick fix. While this shows diligence – to an extent – airing their laundry like this probably isn’t helping them very much… Olio should have kept the information to themselves and just released version 1.1.71 without saying anything. However, the following is a list of updates and fixes that have been released.

  • ALS (Automatic Light Sensor) fixes: All watches should function normally on Auto brightness.
  • Watches rebooting: We have implemented a fix for those of you who saw your watch frequently rebooting.
  • Rapid battery drain: You should now expect a full 12 hours of battery life with Gesture On, and 18+ hours with Gesture Off.
  • Incorrect weather: The weather Complication should no longer display question marks, and the current weather should be accurate.
  • Repeating alarms: Repeating alarms will now get set properly.
  • Images not loading: Watch hands, Bluetooth or battery icons, and other image assets should now load consistently and immediately.

Please remember that the Olio Model one has a passive firmware updating system. You don’t download anything to either your (iPhone or Android) phone. Instead, charge both your watch and your phone, and make sure they are connected via Bluetooth in the Olio Assist app. If your phone app does not say connected, restart Bluetooth on your watch to reconnect. If this does not resolve the connection, please email Olio support and they will assist you.

As mentioned above, unresponsive watches should be fixed with this update. If you your watch turns off on its own, Olio would like you to contact them. They will likely want to take your timepiece back to their San Francisco headquarters for servicing. If it can’t be easily fixed, Olio will replace the watch at no cost to you. Please contact support@oliodevices.com for more information.

Olio has more to offer by the end of January 2016. They are in the process of updating both iOS and Android versions of Olio Assist; and those may already be out by the time this article is published. Please check the appropriate app store for an update if it hasn’t already come down to you.

Olio’s next firmware update will come in mid-February and is currently scheduled to include the following:

  1. Bluetooth enhancements
  2. Navigation in Control Hub (it does currently exist as a notification)
  3. Voice control
  4. The ability to update various watch preferences from the phone apps
  5. Time zones
  6. Silence notification Rule improvements

I’ll have more on all of this at that time, or as I update my Model One. The passive update system is difficult at best, as there’s currently no way to download the firmware update and push it to your phone. Somehow the stars have to align just right before that happens, and there really isn’t any way to set that into motion. It either happens or it doesn’t.

I’ve suggested that Olio needs to provide an “advanced mode” that will allow people to update their watch on their own, but they have so far refused to provide that level of service. While I understand their reasoning why – this stuff is all just supposed to work in the background without any forceful action on the user’s part – it doesn’t “just work.” I’ve had my watch sitting on my desk now for at least two days waiting for this to happen.

So far… Nuthin!

This isn’t supposed to be rocket science; and I’ve followed all of the instructions that I’ve been given. I have no idea why this is such a difficult process. Unfortunately, this is partially escalated due to all of the problems and issues that the Model One has.

If the product were functioning as designed, then there likely wouldn’t be a need for any kind of “advanced mode” that allowed you to download and push a firmware update to the watch.

That may just be me; but I suspect that it isn’t. I’m pretty certain that the issues, problems, frustrations and concerns that I’ve got are ones that are being voiced by every single Model One owner.

If you have any ideas, or additional information on any of this, I’d love to hear from you. You can reach me via the discussion area below. I monitor all of my postings here on Soft32, so it’s easy to get in touch with me.

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Apple Posts New Beta of OS X 10.11.4

Minor bug fixes seem to be headed to developers in the second seed in as many weeks…

OS X 10.11.4 Beta

Apple seems to be moving forward with its plans to squash bugs in OS X 10.11 El Capitan, as it released beta two (2) – build 15E27e – of OS X 10.11.4 to its developer community on 2015-01-25.  This build contains enhancements to many of Apple’s core OS apps, line Notes, where they added enhancements to password protection and bug fixes. We also got the standard, “OS X 10.11.4 improves the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac” language as well.

Secure Notes features in OS 10.11.4 will marry up with Secure Notes in iOS 9.3. We’ll also see marrying of Live Photos in Messages and iMessage on the desktop and on your compatible iDevice, respectively.  Live Photos are an iPhone 6s and 6s Plus exclusive.  They could be sent from device to device easily, but on the desktop, users who wanted to view Live Photos needed to use the Photos app.  Support for Live Photos will now come to Messages on the desktop when OS X 10.11.4 is released in the coming months.

Viewing Live Photos in Messages is easy.  All you need to do is double click the image in the Messages timeline.  The window that pops up includes both sound and animation as well as options for opening up the Live Photo for editing and review.

OS X 10.11 El Capitan is Apple’s latest version of its desktop operating system.  Version 10.11.4, beta 2, is the latest developer preview, and its available from Apple’s Developer Portal or the Mac App Store.

 

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Apple Releases OS X El Capitan 10.11.3

The latest version of Apple’s desktop operating system is out

This past week has been a busy one for Apple. Not only did they release a new version of iOS 9 – iOS 9.2.1 – but they also released a new version of OS X El Capitan. Version 10.11.3 is now readily available for download from the Mac App Store, and can be installed by all El Capitan users as of this writing.

os x el capitan

During the beta testing period, no notable defects were identified. The update, which is largely a bug fix and stability release, doesn’t contain anything of note according to Apple’s release notes on the operating system. According to them,

The OS X El Capitan 10.11.3 update improves the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac.

This update contains bug fixes and security updates, including
Fixes an issue that may prevent some Mac computers from waking from sleep when connected to certain 4K displays.
Third-party .pkg file receipts stored in /var/db/receipts are now retained when upgrading from OS X Yosemite.

The next version of OS X El Capitan, version 10.11.4 is currently in testing. Also marked as a stability and bug fix release, OS X 10.11.4 won’t introduce any new features or functionality. The release is likely targeted for mid to late Spring 2016 and is rumored to be released along side iOS 9.3.

If you’re running OS X 10.11, you should check the Mac App Store for the update and install it at your earliest convenience. I’ve been running the update for the past few days, and it seems stable.

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Apple Releases iOS 9.2.1

Apple released the latest version of iOS 9 into the wild the other day…

Apple-iOS-9
As of this writing, the fifth version  of iOS 9, iOS 9.2.1 has been released into the wild.  Previously, Apple released 9.0.1, 9.0.2, iOS 9.1 and iOS 9.2 after the initial release of iOS 9.0 in the third quarter of last year (2015). iOS 9.2.1 has been  in testing since mid-December 2015 and has seen three beta releases.

As updates and releases go, iOS 9.2.1 isn’t a big one. It’s got bug fixes and security updates in it, including an MDM fix for enterprise customers.  iOS 9.2.1 will be followed in short order by iOS 9.3, which is currently sitting in beta testing with members of Apple’s Developer community.  It should be released in about 6-8 weeks, so some time this coming Spring. Its considered to be a much bigger update, with iOS’s new Night Shift feature as a major deliverable.  Night Shift is intended to change the overall color of the light used by your iOS screens (changing it from blue to yellow).  Cutting down on blue light exposure in the evening hours will help promote better sleep and sleep habits for individuals who use their iDevices moments before trying to close their eyes and go to sleep. IOS 9.3 will also introduce new educational features, too.

If you have an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus, iOS 9.3 will also include new Quick Actions and it will introduce updates for apps and features like Apple News, Apple Notes, Apple Health, Siri, CarPlay as well as other updates and features.

IOS 9.2.1 is available now and should be a 170-300MB OTA (over the air) update.

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Time to get your Browser On

Ok, Microsoft killed IE8, IE9 and IE10. So… now what?

Introduction
About a week or so ago as of this writing, Microsoft effectively killed IE8, IE9 and IE10 by ending security updates for these three versions of their venerable browser, Internet Explorer. The only versions of Windows that will be able to use IE9 or IE10 after this is Windows Vista SP2 and Windows Server 2008 SP2.

However, like Windows XP, not many people are using Vista any longer. It was never a very popular operating system, being very overly resource intensive to the point of being difficult to run on contemporary computers. Upgrading to Windows 7 from Windows Vista was always a better alternative than trying to stick with Vista, in my opinion. But that’s another column for another time.

For now, if you were using Windows 7 or earlier, and you’ve been using IE8, IE9 or IE10, you have a choice to make. The list list is fairly short:

  1. You can upgrade to IE11 – If you’re using Windows 7 or Windows 8.x, you can follow the upgrade instructions here or you can upgrade directly by going here
  2. You can upgraded to Windows 10 – You can upgrade your PC to Windows 10 here. Once you do that, you can try IE11 or you can use Edge.
  3. You can upgrade to an alternative browser – You have a few choices: Firefox, Google Chrome or Opera

In my opinion, your best option, is the last option – upgrade to an alternative browser. I’ll get to why in a sec. I want to touch briefly on why the first two options may not be what you need.

Upgrading to IE11 can be problematic. At the end of the day, IE11 is still IE. IE is still a mess and still pretty much breaks the internet. IE11 still has a GREAT deal of legacy IE code in it. Its not something that I would want to run on any of my computers. If you have cause or reason to ditch ANY version of IE, not only would I do it; but I wouldn’t choose another version of IE to replace it. That’s probably some of the most sage advice you’re ever going to get from me or any other tech pundit – IE. Avoid it like the plague.

I’ve also had a GREAT deal to say about Windows 10 over the past year. It isn’t the field of sunshine and daisies that Microsoft has made it out to be. It has a number of different issues that I’ve outlined in a number of different articles. You can see some of them – perhaps the most serious – here; and I’ve outlined issues with upgrading legacy equipment here. There are some key take aways that you should be aware of:

  1. Microsoft is pushing everyone to upgrade to Windows 10. Period. They’re making it harder and harder to stay on Windows 7 or Windows 8.x
  2. Some Windows 7 or Windows 8.x PC’s weren’t meant, intended or are recommended candidates for a Windows 10 upgrade. Despite what Microsoft says about ANY PC running either Windows 7 or Windows 8.x being able to run the OS, its not always a good idea, especially on a tablet-styled ultrabook. That device may be running an optimized version of Windows, and the OEM or retailer may not officially support Windows 10 on that device. I hope I made that VERY clear in the article I wrote on my experience with Windows 10 on an officially unsupported device.

I’d even go so far to say that the low end Surface Pro 3 (with the i3 processor and 64GB of SSD storage) isn’t a good candidate for Windows 10. The i3 just doesn’t have enough punch.

Viable Options – A New Browser
Let’s run through these quickly. There’s one that I’d like to concentrate on.

Chrome
Its one of the most popular browsers in the world, but I actually think my malware issues occurred due to a security issue in the browser. I’m still having email issues and I have 2-factor authentication enabled. Once I finally and completely shed this bug, I’m never using Chrome again. I’d drop Gmail too, but I’ve not too much tied to that Google Apps email address.

Firefox
Interestingly enough, Firefox is an thought-provoking choice. Its built on the same core as Chrome – the Mozilla Project. Its similar enough to be like Chrome so that if you’re used to using it, you’re on familiar ground. However, its different enough to be its own animal and not susceptible to every bug and security hole that effects Chrome.

Opera
opera_logoOpera is a compelling alternative browser choice for a number of reasons. The most compelling of which is that it’s not one of the most widely known choices. I’ll get to why this is a huge oversite and why it might be YOUR browser of choice in due order.

Speed
Opera uses the Blink web browsing engine, which was developed as part of the Chromium project. The Chromium project was a joint effort between google, Opera, Intel and Samsung, among others. The engine is similar to that found in both Chrome and Firefox. It’s also largely responsible for Opera’s ability to crunch through web pages quickly.

Recently, Opera went head to head with Chrome, Firefox, IE and Microsoft Edge in a Best of Breed web browser competition conducted by PC World. In that test, a selection of over 30 web sites were selected. Each browser opened each site and page loads were timed and evaluated.

During this test, Opera turned out to be the best performing browser. Opera 31, with no Flash, loaded pages in just 1.64 sec. With a Flash plug-in, it required only 2.21 sec to open a page. It outperformed Google Chrome 44 (1.8 sec and 2.33 sec, respectively), and was much faster than Firefox 39 (2.6 sec. and 5.59 sec).

Opera has also gone through an extensive code refactoring. The software is really light on its feet and is less resource intensive. It’s really quick. Of everything I’m going to mention about Opera, this is probably its most compelling use factor. There are a few reasons why people use specific browsers. They either have a specific look and feel, or they offer a specific plugin or extension, or they’re fast.

The state of customization or extensions (see below) is easy to find. Most modern browsers offer ways to do this. However, at the end of the day, it’s the speed at which a particular browser renders a web page that keeps it as your browser of choice. Period. Opera has clearly demonstrated that it can play in the same internets as the big boys, AND it can outperform them.

Security
The software is under active development and security updates are released regularly. The software will also auto-update when new versions and security patches are available. You will never have to update the software on your own.

At the end of the day, staying secure is probably one of the biggest reasons why people have moved away from any and all versions of Internet Explorer (and likely one of the biggest reasons why Microsoft stopped supporting earlier versions of Internet Explorer). When Microsoft integrated it into the OS back in the Windows 98 days, it really screwed things up. It brought a browser’s insecurities to the heart of your operating system. Since Opera isn’t built on the core foundations of Microsoft Windows AND is cross platform (you can use it on OS X, Linux as well as Windows)

Eye Candy
If you’re really interested in customizing the look of your browser, Opera supports browser themes and background images. You can choose from their online catalog or use your own image. Thanks to their catalog, you can probably change themes as often as the wind changes directions.

Customizations
If you’re interested in enhancing the functionality of your browser, then you need to check out Opera’s online catalog of browser extensions. You can get weather forecasts. You can automatically translate web pages to your native language. You can install online security and ad-blocking software that integrates with the browser. Extensions enhance Opera, making it truly your own.

Opera also adjusts to your browsing habits, including how you search for content. You can choose one of the predefined, default search engines, like Google or Yahoo, or if it’s not already on the list, you can customize search by adding your own favorite search engine.

Off the Beaten Path
Of all of the modern browsers that I’ve seen in use here in the US, Opera isn’t high on the list. While that may make you think you should make another choice, it really shouldn’t.

Opera has many of the same features and functions of the more popular browsers, but it flies under the radar. Browser specific or targeted attacks shouldn’t effect it, as most malware is likely to target security holes in Chrome and Firefox.

Conclusion
Look, just because Microsoft has killed IE8, IE9 and IE10 doesn’t mean you HAVE to use Internet Explorer 11 or even Windows 10 if you don’t want to (well… at least for now, as far as Windows 10 is concerned. Microsoft is making it harder and harder to stay on Windows 7 or Windows 8.x).

However, if you’re concerned about finding a better browser, you can choose one of the top remaining, two; OR, you can go a bit off reservation and take a long, serious look at Opera.

It’s faster than Chrome and Firefox. Its secure. It’s easy to throw a coat of paint on and customize, making it new when you need it to be new. Based on all of this and the fact that is likely off most malware writer’s radar, Opera presents itself as a serious contender for your internet browsing needs.

It’s not rocket science, kids, but it is going to stop you and make you consider your options… IE is a train wreck. Chrome and Firefox are the most popular modern browser choices but have their own issues. Opera offers all the benefits that they do, but offer better performance and better security.

Are you using IE8, IE9 or IE10? Are you concerned about using IE11 or having to move to Windows 10 when you’ve already decided, its not for you ? Are you confused about what alternative browser is best for you? Have you used Opera lately? Why don’t you meet me in the discussion area, below, and give me your thoughts on browser security, and all of the alternatives I’ve out line here? Have I missed something or another alternative browser? Let me know in the comments section, below!

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Here Comes the iPad Pro

A replacement candidate for the Surface Pro 3 has been identified…

iPad-Pro-Smart-Keyboard

Yes, yes, yes… I know.

Many of you expected this and are not surprised at all – the iPad Pro is going to get a chance to be my digital note taker in the office.

When I dumped my Surface Pro 3, I was pretty annoyed. Hell, let’s face it – I was really mad. The Surface Pro 3 has some real issues with Windows 10 and Microsoft OneNote 2013/ 2016.

It’s not pretty…

When I put the Surface Pro 3 head to head with the Surface Pro 4, I came away with some serious concerns and misgivings about where Microsoft was headed with the Surface Pro line (which, by the way, includes the Microsoft’s Surface Book).

Both the Surface Pro 4 and the Surface Book have problems with drivers, battery life, and in the case of the Surface Book, detaching from the native keyboard. These issues are so severe, in some cases, that people – including the friend I have in the office who lent me his SP4 to put head to head with my SP3 – returned them for replacement or refund. It’s a shame, too, as all three of these ultrabooks are really very nice… you just apparently have to use them for the right tasks, with power available, and without detaching the keyboard (in the case of the Surface Book), or you run into problems.

To be honest, it was the head to head article that I wrote that really pushed things over the edge for me and really prompted me to sell (read: dump) my Surface Pro 3. Windows 10 is problematic on it and OneNote is almost unusable, if you’re not careful.

So, enter the iPad Pro…

The office procured one for me, and I’ll be putting it through its paces. I’ve got the 128GB version on T-Mobile; and I’m using a instead of Apple’s Smart Keyboard for iPad Pro. it’s a matter of preference, really… I’ve played with the Pro’s Smart Keyboard and I didn’t like the way the keys felt; or the way it worked (attached to the iPad and flipped around). I instead asked for the Logitech Create Keyboard, and though it adds a great deal of [overall] thickness to the device, it provides a much better typing and computing experience in my opinion. The keys have nice travel, and I’m able to touch type on it as I would with any other laptop or computer I work with.

The fact that it’s at least $20 USD cheaper than the Apple Smart Keyboard for iPad Pro is just a bonus.

Yes… I have an Apple Pencil scheduled to arrive in the next week or two. The fact that these things are hard to come by (I’ve been calling the local Apple Store a few times a week to inquire about buying one in store) isn’t helping matters. The iPad Pro really wants an Apple Pencil, despite the fact that taking notes in OneNote via the Logitech Create Keyboard works very, very well.

I’ll have a full review of the iPad Pro, the Logitech CREATE Keyboard and the Apple Pencil as soon as I’ve had a chance to spend some time with all of them.

At this point, I’m working on an opinion. If you just can’t wait and need something to chew on, you can go back and read this article on what’s going to make or break the iPad Pro. While it may have been a bit early on in the process for me, I really think the article speaks to some of the major hurdles the device is going to have to get passed in order to be the success that it wants and needs to be, especially in the enterprise.

In the meantime, just hang out…

I’ve got a few other interesting things that I’m working on that many of you might find interesting:

The Conclusion to the Smartwatch Roundup that I’ve been writing for (literally) the last year. While all of the principle players have been reviewed, I’ve got some issues that I’m still trying to work through with the Olio Mode One that have been keeping me much more occupied than I would like…
The review of the Hendocks Horizontal Dock for MacBook Pro 15″ Retina. While there are some issues to work through, I’ve been rather happy with the way things have been going; but I don’t want to ruin the review.
The Release of Windows 10 Mobile. Its rumored to be right around the corner. I’m hoping that the Windows Phone I have gets the upgrade sooner rather than later. If it does, I’ll have a full review, rather than just a news-based article speaking to the release of Microsoft’s mobile OS.

What about you? Did you get any new tech for the Holidays? Am I missing some big piece of gadgetry that I should follow up with an article or two or with a full review? Will wearables continue to be a big player in 2016? Is the iPad Pro JUST a bigger iPad or will it be as ground breaking as Apple hopes it will be?

Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area, below and give me your take on all of these and more? I’d love to hear what you’ve got to say!

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Microsoft is Under the Antitrust Microscope in China

Apparently, China has “major issues” it wants Microsoft to explain…

chinese-flagIn July of 2014, China raided Microsoft’s local offices and confiscated a lot of data as part of an antitrust investigation. On 2016-01-05, Chinese regulators demanded that Microsoft explain “major issues it discovered with that data”. This was the first time in over a year that China gave any indication that their antitrust investigation would be moving forward.

Microsoft has publicly stated that it is “serious” about complying with Chinese law and to addressing SAIC’s (China’s State Administration for Industry and Commerce) concerns.

At the beginning of the investigation, China said it was interested in information on how both Windows and Office were bundled, about compatibility between the two and other unnamed concerns.

China’s most recent demands haven’t been clarified or spelled out, but SAIC has asked Microsoft to submit their “defense in a timely manner.”

God knows what they need to defend, or what Microsoft needs to respond to.

Some are speculating that this is retaliation due to Microsoft retiring Windows XP and discontinuing support for it to any and all customers – including the Chinese government and its citizens. China had asked Microsoft to extend XP’s lifespan. Microsoft refused. China said, “pretty please;” and Microsoft STILL said no. China has banned the use of Windows 8 on any government computers.

Microsoft is heavily pushing the adoption of Windows 10 around the world, and China is no exception to this marketing strategy. A short while ago, as of this writing, Microsoft expanded a partnership with one of China’s largest defense firms where it would license Windows 10 to government agencies and some state owned corporations in the energy, telecommunications and transportation industries.

While this is a serious issue, and while Microsoft is giving this issue the appropriate level of priority, it seems as though Microsoft could make all of this go away if they simply provided continued Windows XP support to the Chinese government.

I’m pretty certain, however, that capitulation isn’t a consideration for Microsoft, for a number of different reasons, the most important being

  1. Microsoft isn’t providing preferred XP support to anyone
  2. Microsoft is pushing the world’s Windows users to Windows 10
  3. Windows XP has been heavily pirated in China

Given all of this – and especially the last two points – Microsoft doesn’t really have any incentive TO capitulate. I know I wouldn’t want to if I were Satya Nadella.

Until SAIC can specify what they want Microsoft to respond to, I’m not certain how anyone would reasonably respond to this – in a timely manner or not.

What do you think? Is China’s SAIC just ticked off that their XP PC’s are unsupported? Does Microsoft have anything tangible to worry about in China? What do you think the final outcome will be?

Why don’t you meet me in the discussion area below and let me know what you think?

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Olio Released Model One Firmware Updates 1.1.61 & 1.1.63

olio updateOlio recently released firmware updates to help address bugs and issues in their smartwatch, the Model One.

If you recall, I recently published a review of Olio’s Model One smartwatch. Unfortunately, I declared it pretty much one of the worst train wrecks I’ve ever seen in an electronic accessory, and most certainly, the worst product I’ve looked at in 2015. My initial reaction was so poor that I recommended everyone stay away from it for now.

Recently, I’ve received noticed of not one, but two, device firmware updates for the Model One, direct from Olio. Firmware version 1.1.61 was released on 2015-12-25 and addressed a number of different issues. You can see the specifics on those, directly below. Firmware version 1.1.63 was released to resolve a firmware update issue where the watch may get stuck in “update mode, ” and not recover. In this case, as long as the device is connected to power and showing connected in Olio Assist, Olio says version 1.1.63 can be passively downloaded to the watch and the watch updated, resolving the issue. Watches successfully updated to firmware version 1.1.61 without issue would simply update to 1.1.63, and would see no additional issues or new functionality other than what came with version 1.1.61.

Thankfully, I didn’t experience this particular issue. My watch updated to versions 1.1.61 and 1.1.63 without a hitch.

Bugs and Issues Resolved:

  • Bluetooth on your watch and phone settings should no longer randomly disconnect. If it does, it should automatically reconnect.
  • Improved gesture sensitivity and optimization.
  • Added tap only setting on watch so that if gesture sensitivity doesn’t work well, you can put it on tap-only mode to save battery life.
  • Bug fixed that can cause the watch to run out of battery in less than 4 hours.
  • Automatically setting all watches to medium brightness to prevent the ALS from causing some screens to turn off. A long-term fix to use auto brightness is in development.
  • Fixed accelerometer bug that can cause the watch not to turn on via gesture. The watch will reboot when the accelerometer is in improper state.
  • Implemented synchronization protocol to ensure all Android phones display accurate time within 10 seconds. Some Android phones don’t send notifications continuously over Bluetooth, so the time update takes a while to send.
  • Fixed bug that can cause the wrong caller to be displayed on the watch during phone calls.
  • Fixed bug that causes the “updating” screen to stay on too long when updating day/night.
  • Fixed bug where “auto” mode didn’t transition properly in day/night mode.
  • Fixed bug that can cause notification actions to not work properly when notifications first came in on watch.

Based on the information above, some of the big problems that have been causing the watch to run through its full battery charge in four hours or less has been resolved. I’ll be looking at this VERY carefully, as it speaks to how the device uses Bluetooth as well as power management.

Battery life still remains the biggest issue with the Olio Model One. Even though I’ve got the latest updates on my watch, I’ve still had to have my watch sit on its charger part of the day today. (and the thing still gets bloody hot when it charges…)

Honestly, things are getting a bit better, as the update from 1.1.61 to 1.1.63 for me happened over night as planned – and was the first firmware update to happen this way. Every other update I’ve had to babysit and try to coax along. The battery life does seem a bit better, but not much.

There seems to be a long interval of time between 100% charge and 90-85% charge, and then after that, the device’s charge level drops like a rock to the mid 40%’s, where it again sits for about an hour before dropping like a rock again to the mid 20%’s. From there, it’s a gradual and steady decline to the end. I’ve also noticed that when my watch hits one of these plateaus, I can often expect it to restart on its own, out of nowhere, and when it comes back, the charge rate is much reduced (by as much as 15%).

Olio is also working on other issues, and has other updates planned. Items up for release next include, but aren’t limited to the following:

Known Issues with Pending Fixes

  • The iOS app can show disconnected when the phone setting and watch settings say connected. If this happens, turn Bluetooth off on the watch, wait five seconds, and then turn it back on. If the issue persists, kill the Olio Assist app, turn Bluetooth off on the watch, restart the phone app, and turn Bluetooth on the watch back on.
  • In “gesture off” mode, the watch will detect some wrist turns as taps. We are tuning tap detection to prevent this.
  • Despite the watch being on the charger for a long time, it might show less than 100% charged. The wireless charging firmware stops charging the watch when the battery reaches 100%, and does not restart until the battery drops below 90%. We are working on an update to the firmware that will keep the battery topped off without degrading the battery health.
  • We have identified a state that can cause the watch to charge slower than it should (>90 minutes). We are working on a fix to prevent this state from occurring.
  • It is possible that your watch will enter a state where the screen does not turn on. This is a known issue with the ALS calibration and we are working on a permanent fix. In the meantime, if you notice this issues, shine a bright light (your mobile flashlight should work) to get the screen to turn on, and set the brightness to medium.
  • When entering a new time zone, watches paired to iOS can take up to two hours to update to the new time zone. We have identified a new way to update the watch time from iOS and are working to implement that change. Temporarily, restarting Bluetooth on the watch will reset the time.

I’ll keep everyone posted on how things go with some of these updates. I still can’t recommend this smartwatch to anyone, even those that are used to beta testing and to living on the bleeding edge of technology. It’s just a bit too cold and bloody out here…

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