Court Affirms Samsung v. Apple Ruling

Samsung still owes Apple a ton of money…

unnamed

Yes…  The landmark trial between Apple and Samsung still isn’t settled.

Late last week, a US Federal Circuit court of Appeals denied Samsung’s request for a new en banc review of a previous decision.  This decision largely kept Apple’s patent infringement win intact.  Samsung’s last, and only resort is the US Supreme Court.

A couple of months ago, Samsung petitioned the Court for a rehearing of a previous decision regarding the patent infringement trial against Apple.  Specifically, the appeals court in May found that the readjusted jury trial award was correct.  At stake, is the $400M damage award that Samsung claims is incorrect.

The issue is that Samsung says a “complex device like a tablet or smartphone (the iPad or iPhone) uses [potentially] thousands of patented technologies.”  They’ve noted that Apple only asserted a few that cover minor features of the whole device. Samsung also claims that patents successfully leveraged during the trial are ineligible for damage awards.

If you remember, late last month, news hit the wire that companies like Dell, eBay, Facebook, Google, HP and others wrote a Friend of the Court brief supporting Samsung in their assertion.  These firms warned the court that if Apple were successful in the damages trial, it would “lead to absurd results and have a devastating impact on companies, including amici, who spend billions of dollars annually on research and development for complex technologies and their components.”

Apparently, the Friend of the Court brief didn’t sway the Court.

What’s left now, is a wait and see game.

We’re waiting and seeing because the SCotUS is a fickle lot.  They don’t hear every case brought before them.  They get to pick and choose which cases to hear; and if they decline to hear the case, then the last decision is upheld.

In this case, that means that the final award tally of $548M – though still currently being contested by both parties – is likely going to be the FINAL award.  …And that’s IF Samsung even decides to go that route.  They may just have to “man up” and take their medicine.

The graphic, above, is still VERY damning to Samsung’s case, even after an additional 4-5 years. I owned at least three of Samsung’s devices shown in the Before iPhone block.  It’s clear and insanely obvious that after the iPhone was released, their designs DRASTICALLY changed to copy its profile.  What was copied internally and in violation of Apple owned patents was – and is – for the courts to decide.

What are your thoughts on this issue?  Why don’t you join me in the discussion area below, and give me your take on the whole Apple v. Samsung issue?  I’d love to hear them.

Related Posts:

Fitbit Announces New Products at CES

The Smartwatch and fitness band markets just got an interesting pair of competitors…

FitBit

The quantitative self is going to be big in 2015. Apple’s Watch is scheduled to appear this year. Microsoft Band is here and I’m currently evaluating one and will have a review of it shortly. As it’s really the first serious fitness and smartwatch device out there right now, it’s likely going to be the base line that I use this year when I take a rather severe look at this particular category. As I’ve stated previously, it’s a bit confusing.

But as I eluded to in the title and teaser of this article, fitness band maker, Fitbit has announced the availability of two new products in the smartwatch and fitness wearables categories. Fitbit one of the market leaders in fast-growing Connected Health and Fitness category, announced the availability of the Fitbit Charge HR and the Fitbit Surge, which will begin shipping across North America with global availability following shortly after on 2015-01-06.

The company also announced it will extend popular features like on-device exercise summaries – already available on Fitbit Surge – to Fitbit Charge HR, as well as new features coming soon, like multi-device support across its entire product line. Fitbit is always working to enhance its full line of award-winning trackers to deliver even more advanced, game-changing features designed to make tracking more intuitive and efficient.

“[Fitbit is] focused on [their] mission to empower and inspire people to lead healthier, more active lives. [They] have always understood that activity tracking is only part of the journey to attaining better health. It is critical that the information users get from tracking is easy to understand and useful, and the experience is fun and engaging – so they stay motivated,” said James Park, CEO and Co-Founder of Fitbit. “With Fitbit Charge HR and Fitbit Surge, features like heart rate tracking are made simpler by being continuous and automatic so the technology works no matter what you’re doing and the experience is seamless yet powerful, giving users valuable all day health insights.”

Fitbit Charge HR helps users track their active and resting heart rates and delivers continuous, automatic wrist-based heart rate tracking all day (not just when you wake up) and during workouts to give a complete picture of your health and fitness. It has a bright OLED screen that displays all day stats including continuous heart rate tracking with steps, distance, floors climbed and calories burned.

Fitbit Surge is Fitbit’s Fitness Super Watch, and it includes all the powerful features of Fitbit Charge HR, plus a built -in GPS, Multiple Sport Mode, customizable watch faces, Caller ID, text alerts and mobile music control. Along with its GPS, it has 3-axis accelerometers, 3-axis gyroscope, a digital compass, an optical heart rate monitor, altimeter, ambient light sensor and a backlit LCD touchscreen display for easy viewing and navigation through real-time stats, workout apps and alarms. Most importantly, it has up to 7 days of battery life, to track everything from the work week to a full marathon on one charge.

Fitbit Charge HR and Fitbit Surge are available now on Fitbit.com and online at leading retailers nationwide. Both will be widely available in major North American retailers by the end of January. Fitbit Charge HR ($149.95) will be available in black, plum, blue and tangerine; and the Fitbit Surge ($249.95) will be available in black, blue and tangerine.

Related Posts:

2014 Predictions Scorecard

I made some predictions back in early January 2014. Let’s see how well I did…

Predictions

The end of any year always has us taking a quick look back to see where we’ve been to help us figure out where and how far we want to look ahead. 2014 was no different; and in fact, after I assess my awesome skills of prior, predictive, prestidigitation, I plan to make additional predictions for the new year. Stay tuned to Soft32 for my technology predictions for 2015.

So, I found my predictions for 2014… and again, you have to understand that many of these are nothing more than a SWAG – a silly, wild, <beep!> guess. Technology is like water – it flows where it wants, and predicting just where and what gets wet is more of an art than a science. You’ll need to have a couple different browser windows open for this, for everything to make sense. To get the best idea of how I did, you might want to have this column in one window, and last year’s predictions open in another.

I’m going to run down how I did on a scale of 1-5, 1 being low, 5 being high. The best score I can get is 20, as I only made four predictions for 2014. Let’s take a quick look at how I did.

1.   Wearable Computing Still Doesn’t Take Off

Yep. This WAS an easy one; and I’m going to give myself 5 points here. While the Pebble Steel finally did make its appearance in 2014, it was 3-4 months behind schedule; and while it may be timeless, I’m certain many will agree that it didn’t hang the moon. The Apple Watch won’t be released until sometime in 2015; and with a $350 entry point, I’m not certain how many people will jump at the opportunity to own one. Other smartwatches like the Galaxy Gear and the Galaxy Gear S, again while nice, are also expensive and a bit too restrictive – you have to have a specific kind of Galaxy S smartphone for these to work. The Moto 360 also hasn’t sold well. Most everyone , I think, will agree that wearables are still, unfortunately, confusing.

2.  Blackberry Totally Folds – Sells off its Assets

Ok, I blew this one and take no points at all for it. Blackberry did fade, but didn’t fold. I haven’t heard or seen anything on it in the news in quite a while, and that may be their plan for right now – lay low. Regroup. Come back with a better strategy. I still think they should be looking for a buyer. Microsoft might be a good home for them; but I’ve also been saying that for a while, too.

3.  Apple and Samsung Still Can’t Get it Together

This is the love-hate relationship that everyone hates to love and loves to hate. These two still haven’t gotten it together, but tensions have at least cooled if not quieted down some. The trial isn’t over, the appeal is still up in the air; and while they may be resigned to working together, given the opportunity I think that there’d still be blood on the playground if left to their own devices. I’m going to take 4 points here, as I think I was really close, but not quite dead on.

4.  Microsoft’s Next CEO is

I had a bit more than half of this right. I had it down to either Allan Mulallay or Satya Nadella. I’m going to take 3 points here, as I couldn’t quite dope it all out, though I did pick Nadella as a finalist for the right reasons.

My final score is 12/20 or 60%. It’s not a great score… but it’s not a bad score either. The Blackberry thing totally did me in. Instead of dying, they kinda faded into the background. We’ll have to see where CEO Jon Chen takes them in the future. I still think the best thing for him to do is look for a buyer, and to look to Microsoft for that purchase. That might be a huge pill for Blackberry to swallow, however, as Microsoft and their Exchange ActiveSync has always been a huge competitor for Blackberry, and selling to a competitor may be seen as admitting defeat… I don’t know; but Microsoft’s money is just as green as everyone else’s.

Did you make any predictions for 2014? If so, how did you do? Did you bet on the wearables market taking off; or were you in a wait and see mode? Did you think Satya Nadella would be named Microsoft’s third CEO, or did you pick another candidate to take the helm? Did you think that Apple would not only release a larger iPhone, but release a complete phablet as well in the iPhone 6 Plus? There was a bit to choose from, and not everything came to light near the end of 2013 in time to actually make a prediction for the entire year.

How did you do on your predictions though? Were you close? Were you totally off; or were you dead on? I’d love to hear how you did with your 2014 predictions. Why don’t you meet me in the discussion area below and tell me how you fared?

Related Posts:

Confusing Wearable Tech – Smartwatches and Health Bands

Does anyone know the difference between the two?  Does it matter..?

Check this Computer World article about apple watch

Ok… those who are confused, please raise your hand

That should be everyone, by the way…

Ever since the Apple Watch announcement, the tech world has been all , uh-hem, a-twitter with news and such on wearable technology.  Now that Google Glass is (nearly) officially dead – nothing has been seen or heard from Google on it in more than a year – the trend in the market is turning away from stuff you strap to your head to stuff you strap on your arm or wrist.

There are a number of different options out there and while I would REALLY love to turn this article into a roundup of smartwatches and fitness bands in time for the 2014 Holiday Season, I just don’t have enough money to go and buy those that are most compelling.  Unfortunately, most of them cost $199 to $349, and there are at least 4-5 that really should get looked at, including the Microsoft Band, the Galaxy Gear S, the Apple Watch, the Fitbit and of course the Nike Fuel Band SE; and I just don’t have the cash to buy them all and compare them, regardless of how much I would really love to.  Heck, the Apple Watch isn’t even out yet, and won’t be available for the 2014 Holiday Season, anyway…

The biggest problem I see with wearable technology right now is no one knows the difference between a smartwatch, a fitness band or any other electronic biometric sampling device you might strap to your arm or wrist. Without going into a huge litany of which devices have which sensors or have which processors, etc., the following chart may be of help in trying to tell some of these things apart.

tabel

There’s not a lot of information the specifics of Apple Watch. It should have most if not all of the same sensors as Microsoft Band, but I was unable to find specifics on every sensor it has.  Though introduced in September of 2014, I think more specifics will become available as its actual release nears.

So what’s all the hub-bub about?

The quantitative self.

Everyone wants to know how much they weigh, how much weight they’ve lost, how many calories they’ve taken in versus how many calories they’ve burned.  They want to know how often they exercise, how far they’ve walked, how much hydration they are replenishing, what their active and resting heart rates are, how many flights of stairs they’ve gone up and down, how far they’ve run, walked or spun on a treadmill or elliptical.  The whole sedentary American thing has finally driven many to get off their widening bottoms and eat less and move more; but like so many people wanting instant gratification, they gotta know where they are right NOW.

In the next few years, its obvious to me that first world consumers are going to see a great many wearable computing devices come and go.  The category is going to define and REdefine itself over the next three or so years in my opinion and unless the devices we buy today are 1) Made to last, 2) Upgradeable (via firmware or other software updates), or 3) Easily and cheaply replaceable, a great many consumers are going to be very upset (as well as have a boat load of unused, electronic junk in one of their desk or dresser drawers…).

As I said, some of the devices being introduced today are anywhere from $200 to $350 USD bucks a piece.  The Nike Fuel Band I bought in December of 2012 recently broke (the button doesn’t press any longer, so the display won’t activate when its pushed).  Its not quite two years old; and it was $150 USD when I bought it. I recently purchased a Pebble Steel in February of 2013, and while it still works and is in GREAT shape (albeit with some weird software based display problems…) there’s no doubt in my mind that its going to (or likely could) get left behind for something else in just a few short months by a Microsoft Band or Apple Watch for example, that will do everything that it does, plus a whole lot more; and THAT was $250 bucks…

So, what’s the difference between a smartwatch and a fitness band..?  Honestly, that’s a GREAT question.  Currently, there’s no real difference between the two.  The way both are being engineered, they pretty much have much of the same functionality. Things like Microsoft Band and the Nike Fuel Band SE are more of a fitness band only because they’re more of a ruggedized, rubber wrapped bracelet than a (sports, luxury, etc.) watch like Apple Watch or the Galaxy Gear S, though they do and track much of the same kinds of things and data, respectively.

So, what do you get?  What do you wait for?  How do you tell them apart?  Right now, without any real market, design, or engineering differentiation, its really up to you and what kind of thing you wanna strap to your wrist or arm.  Do you want something sporty like the Microsoft Band, or do you want something sophisticated and elegant like the Apple Watch or the Galaxy Gear S?

Right now, it really doesn’t matter.

However, in the next few years – even by THIS time NEXT year – there may be a huge differentiator out there that may make a great deal of difference to you and what you’re interested in, want or need to buy based on what you want, what your family can afford and what your doctor wants you to track and maintain.

AND…!  That’s ANOTHER thing…

Don’t even get me started on how accurate or viable your heath care professional(s) will feel about all of this data.  They may think it’s the most accurate stuff in the world, and actively encourage you to get one and compile data with it. They may think it’s a bunch of crap – nothing more than a fad, really – using unreliable or unstable hardware, software and components (because who’s Bluetooth widget hasn’t dropped a connection with their smartphone in the past week..??) – and may not buy into ANY of the data it maintains, instead making you come in to their facility for specific exercising and health monitoring…

The market  has yet to address ANY of those issues; and the FDA has yet to chime in with what I’m certain will eventually become some kind of an addendum or an offshoot of the 21 CFR regulations on medical devices (though it isn’t right now…).

Conclusion & Buying Decision

With the start of the 2014 Holiday Buying Season officially on in the US as of 2014-11-28, the obvious questions are what should I get and should I wait until Apple Watch is available in 2015.

That depends.

As you can see from the chart I created, its going to depend on the depth of your pocket book and what your want to do with the device.  At a $350 entry point, Apple Watch and Samsung Gear S are both at the ultimate high end of the spectrum.

The Nike Fuel Band SE is definitely an activity tracker and NOT a smartwatch, though it tells the time. Time telling is a tertiary function on it, and honestly, the FuelBand SE does little more than track activity. However, at its current price point, it makes sense.  In fact, you can get a FuelBand SE for as little as $99 bucks.

The Fitbit Surge really seems to be firmly stuck in the middle. It wants to be a smartwatch, but Fitbit is so firmly planted in fitness that I think the organization would have a hard time producing anything that didn’t concentrate itself on fitness anyway.  This device is also not available yet. Fitbit notes it as “coming soon” as of the date of this publication.

The Samsung Gear S looks REALLY nice, and it’s the only device that can be its own smartphone, if it needs to at this time.  The Apple Watch is supposed to do this, but it won’t until some time in 2016, and then I don’t know if devices sold in 2015 will be upgradable to that new feature with a simple SIM card.  If not, it would be problematic, because $350 is the ENTRY point price.  The Apple Watch, Watch Edition device (with 18k gold) is likely going to be more than $1000 (depending on the price of gold at the time of release).

Microsoft Band is the only device left at this point, and the biggest problem with it is that Microsoft didn’t produce enough of them.  They are sold out online as of this writing.  There are SOME available at a Microsoft brick and mortar Store, but quantities are extremely limited, and sizing the device is going to be critical, as you’re going to need to have the device sit flush (but not gripping your wrist) so that all the sensors work right.

In my opinion, you can buy in now if you want, but you may want to wait. If you do buy in, and you want something more than just an activity tracker, Microsoft Band is probably your best bet, but you’re going to have a great deal of trouble finding one if you don’t live close to a physical, Microsoft Store.

Does all of this make sense to you?  Do you understand the difference between an activity tracker or fitness band and a smartwatch now?  Does it make a difference to you, this early in the wearables game?  Will you buy into Apple Watch when its released?  Is the Samsung Gear S something you’re interested in?  I’d love to hear from you and get your thoughts on all of this.  Why don’t you join me in the Discussion area below and tell me what you think and what, if anything, you’re going to chase after in this category for the 2014 Holiday Season.  I’d really appreciate hearing from you and getting your insight.

Related Posts:

In-Flight Cellphone Calls to be Banned?

The US DoT is moving towards banning in-flight calls

phone

The use of electronic devices on plane flights has been banned for a number of years, not only in the US, but worldwide. Originally, the thought was that the electro-magnetic radiation or EMR from these devices would interfere with onboard aviation equipment. So the FAA banned their use on flights in the US. Recently, that policy has changed.

Last October, the FAA announced that it would permit the use of all electronic devices during all phases of flight. This meant that you didn’t necessarily have to turn off your iPad or iPod when the doors closed and you had your nose reducing headphones plugged in, turned on and pumping music through your ears during take off. No more crying and screaming children for you!

However, this also meant that you could conceivably spend the entire flight next to Chatty Cathy as she gabbed away on her cell phone at 35,000 feet. However, according to the DoT, the agency is preparing some rules that may prevent just that.

While the FAA hasn’t laid down any new rules, and the DoT hasn’t come out with anything definitive as yet, its clear that the airline carriers are considering making some rules of their own. Your time next to Chatty Cathy may be totally cut off if they get their way, so you may be saved from all of the grief.

As of this writing – 2014-08-11 – I am currently sitting in the O’Hare International Airport waiting on a flight to Pittsburgh, PA for a job interview. I’m flying the Friendly Skies, so United has my business on both legs of this trip. In my opinion, United has been one of the more restrictive carriers with passenger privileges and freedoms in Coach. It will be interesting to see how things go after I get on board.

UPDATE:
OK, well, this is already partially implemented…at least on United. They allow use of portable electronic devices at all times on the plane. When the doors close, they tell you smartphones and tablets with cellular have to be put in airplane mode. Wireless headsets are permitted, but no Wi-Fi. The flight I was on didn’t have in-flight Wi-Fi.

I fully expect that despite what the FAA or the DoT implement as rules or guidelines, that the airline carriers will do what they want. They will likely further limit the use of electronic devices on domestic and international flights originating in the US. Despite what the regulatory agencies specify, passengers will be required to follow the rules the carriers lay down. Failure to do so, will get you booted and likely banned (depending on how you behave). Its going to be an interesting time. I will continue to follow the issue and will report back with any new updates.

In the mean time, why don’t you meet me in the discussion area, below and let me know what you think the FAA and DoT should outline in any new regulations? I’d also like to hear what you think the airlines will do, too; so jump in and give me your thoughts!

Related Posts:

I Think Apple found the Smoking Bazooka

Oh snap..!   Google did in fact agree to indemnify Samsung in the original trial against Apple.

A-lonely-gavel

On any given [Sun]day, this might not be a big deal.   However, there are two big problems with this development that had me nearly reeling this morning as I read first the headline and then the article on Apple Insider. Samsung is in a boat load of trouble; and it may be taking Google down with it. BOTH companies may burn on this one.   This is a huge deal for two specific reasons
1.    Samsung KNEW it was Infringing on Apple Patents – Despite anything that it has said over the course of the past few years while the Apple v. Samsung patent trials were under way, based on Samsung’s request for Google to indemnify them (read – foot the bill for the legal fees and direct the path of their legal defense) Samsung ACTIVELY knew that it had been steeling Apple’s intellectual property. If it hadn’t, then it wouldn’t have asked Google to indemnify them.
2.    Samsung Lied…BIG Time – In short (because Apple’s attorney Harold McElhinny really hit this one out of the park, presenting four (4) different exhibits outlining Samsung’s activities to actively hide its request …REQUEST… to Google to indemnify them) – during active testimony in open court, Samsung denied seeking indemnification from any third party (including Google). Here’s where McElhinny hit the grand slam – he presented four examples that clearly shows that Samsung did in fact ACTIVELY pursue indemnification from Google.
That’s not a smoking gun, kids…that’s a smoking bazooka.   There’s not much left of Samsung’s foot.

The final exhibit that McElhinny presented in his examination was,

“…a letter ‘from Allen Lo of Google, Deputy General Counsel Patents and Patent Litigation,’ to Samsung’s JaeHyoung Kim, dated May 21, 2012. The email, titled, ‘Apple litigation alleged patent infringement,’ was described by James Maccoun, [Google’s counsel], as ‘Google’s essentially offering to defend Samsung to the MADA (Mobile Applications Development Agreement) and does offer to defend some — some claims.’ ”

While this may seem a bit “open and shut,” it actually isn’t. There’s a great deal of, “he said, she said” going on with all of this. After the last trial, which Apple won and was ultimately (after reductions and retrials) awarded a judgment of about $890M USD (and not the original $1B+ USD), Samsung outlined what was described as “minor damages” related to two patents it purchased in 2011, after initially being sued by Apple; and doesn’t appear to amount to much.

For example, one patent related to a FaceTime-like video system which could send video over a low bandwidth line, has expired. Apple Insider calls this “start contrast to Apple’s patent offense, which focuses on four feature patents that Samsung meticulously detailed as features it needed in its own products in order to compete against Apple, including Slide to Unlock and Apple Data Detectors.” At this time, Samsung refuses to license the patents on Apple’s terms, hence the latest law suit from Apple seeking $2.0B in damages, royalties and lost profits.   However, that doesn’t clear Apple of anything.   How – and even IF – it’s relevant to these proceedings remains to be seen.

However, being able to produce these four exhibits that clearly contradict Samsung’s earlier testimony, is – in a word – damning. The fact that Samsung knew it had IP issues and then actively sought protection against them from Google in Samsung’s first patent trial against Apple is telling. They knew they were (at least potentially) in trouble.

One big question from all of this is, “how does this effect Google, if at all?”   Will they be drawn into this because of their own desire to indemnify Samsung; or because of the conspiracy to hide the truth from both the Court and from Apple during the last trial? Will they be fined, or be held partially responsible for the damages and judgment that Apple won?   At any rate, that, and if and how this development effects the current trial, remains to be seen.

The biggest question I have after all this is – how will Judge Koh take all of this?   Since Samsung has been caught in a blatant lie, will Judge Koh penalize Samsung in any way?   Will she hold them in Contempt of Court?   She’s shown herself to be intolerant of the shenanigans going on between the two companies in and out of the courtroom. Given that this is pretty “in your face,” I wonder if she will retaliate.   I know many that would want to, at least initially.

At the end of the day, it’s clear that the legal issues between Apple and Samsung – and potentially Google now – are far from over.   If there’s one thing that this particular revelation has shown me, it’s that the trial still has a lot of legs and still has a great many more skeletons buried deep within both company’s respective closets that may yet be revealed.

What do you make of all of this? Did this surprise you as much as it did me? If so, were you more surprised by the actual facts of the situation or by the fact that Samsung got caught in a lie? How do you think it will affect the current trial, if at all?   Will Judge Lucy Koh act on this particular issue, holding Samsung and/ or Google in contempt of court, will she let it slide; or will she penalize one or both of them in a different way?

I’d really like to hear from everyone.   This could create a really cool conversation, with a great deal of speculation and interesting content.   Why don’t you log in and give me your thoughts in the comments section and tell me what you think?   I’d really like hearing your thoughts on all of this.

The roller coaster ride isn’t over yet, but you’re going to have to watch out for pot holes and other bazooka-like remnants as you make your way through it all. This one has the potential to get a bit messier still…

Related Posts:

2013 Predictions Scorecard

I made some predictions for 2013 just about a year ago. Let’s take a look and see how I did…

2013prediction

Nearly every technology website I know of or frequent takes a stab at tech predictions for the New Year.  Some try to be bold. Some stay close to reality.  I tend to lean that way, myself. If I’m going to put myself out there, I’d rather analyze the trends and use that as a basis to make predictions from.  As such, I have been no different over the years. I try to prognosticate around those trends and then put it out there. However, like most of the other sites, I often fail to go back and see how I did.  Did I get it right?  How accurate was I?  Was I even close??

Well, this year, I found LAST year’s predictions and I’m gonna run through them quickly and then grade myself on how well I did. I had 5 predictions last year (6 with a bonus gaze into the crystal ball…) and I’m going to give myself a max of 2 points per prediction depending on how right, or (more likely) how close I was to what actually transpired.  I’m using a 2 point system simply because it’s easier to grade myself that way. I don’t want to make this too complicated.  Let’s dive in and see how things went.

  1. BB10 Fails – I get 2 points here. BB10 made its debut and quickly went…nowhere. The OS was so poorly received that it caused a major issue for the company. Blackberry (still RIM to many people at the beginning of 2013) reported a loss of over $4B USD last quarter of the year, as well as a CEO switch. Blackberry’s outlook for 2014 doesn’t look any brighter, either.  They’ve farmed the manufacturing of devices out to FoxConn in China and are instead going to concentrate on the OS. This may prove to be a challenge for Blackberry, as they’ve let a great many of their development staff go.  Retaining current or acquiring new development resources is going to be a challenge for them, as I’m not entirely certain they are a safe bet going forward.
  2. RIM Declines, is Purchased by Dell or Microsoft  I get 1 point here.  The company did tank, and they were nearly purchased; but it wasn’t by either Dell or Microsoft.  Blackberry has decided to focus on their enterprise customer base, but unfortunately, I was right about many enterprise users seeing that Blackberry doesn’t have the exclusive lock on Push that it did back in the day.  As such, enterprise users have a wide variety of choices available to them when it comes to mobile messaging.  I think those customers would be smart to bypass Blackberry and choose one of the other options. Getting in too deep with Blackberry could be problematic at this point. I don’t see them sticking around much longer…
  3.  Microsoft Surface RT Products Don’t Survive 2013  I am going to give myself 1 point here. Again, I was close, but it didn’t quite happen the way that I thought it would.  Microsoft took a $900M charge in 2013 , fired Ballmer, totally reorged the company and killed the Windows RT brand, in large part due to the issues and problems with Surface and Windows 8.  However, Microsoft, instead of killing the product line and marching on with something else, has decided to respin Surface, and made very quiet, but strategically sound, partnerships with organizations like the NFL and CBS.  If you watched the NFL Wild Card playoff games on CBS, you’ll notice that each NFL analyst had a Microsoft Surface 2/Surface 2 Pro device, with Type Cover, sitting in front of them.  That, along with the strong 2013 Holiday sales that Surface 2/ Surface 2 Pro enjoyed, may just have saved the product line – and Microsoft for that matter – from an early demise.
  4. Windows 8 is Declared a flop  Yeah… unfortunately, I get 2 points here. Windows 8 is a total disaster; and despite the success that Surface 2/ Surface 2 Pro enjoyed over the 2013 Holiday Sales Season, Microsoft has very quietly admitted defeat with Windows 8. They brought back the Start Button, and gave users the ability to boot straight to the desktop; but that wasn’t enough for most users who are too entrenched into the Aero way of life. Microsoft killed the Windows RT brand and has announced that it will bring back the Start Menu (to what degree remains unknown as of this writing) in what is being currently called Windows 8.1 Update 1, sometime in the Spring of 2014.
  5. No Public Jailbreak of iOS 6 will be Released  Yeah… I blew this one. Before I upgraded my iPhone from iOS 6.x, I jail broke it for, like all of 27 seconds. I quickly put it back, because Cydia and its contents are a hot mess, and there really isn’t anything that I could find from the alternative software store that I wanted or felt safe installing on my iDevice.  However, a public jailbreak for iOS 6.x did get released. It took a while; but it happened.
  6. Competition between Apple & Samsung heats up with Revamped Apple TV  I don’t get any extra credit, either. I really thought that Apple would release the iTV, or what ever it would have been called, last year. Unfortunately, I’m leaving this prediction in the past. I don’t see this happening any time soon, as there are a number of content provider issues that must first be ironed out before this hits the market with any real success, and unfortunately, I really just don’t see those deals getting done.

At the end of the day (or year) I scored 6/10, or 60%.  That’s not too bad…its better than some of the other prediction recaps I saw or listened to in the past week or so.  How did you do?  Did you make any tech predictions last year?  Did they come true/were you accurate?  I’d love to hear what you have to say in the comments, below. Why not weigh in and tell us how YOU did?

Related Posts:

New Electronics, New Accessories – The Added Expense that you Didn’t Count On

screen-shot-2012-09-25-at-1.23.30-pmIts exciting getting new toys, but buying a new gadget can add additional expenses you didn’t count on…

It happens every time you buy a new gadget or iDevice. You get the new toy, and then you find out that many, if not all of the accessories you have for it, aren’t compatible. I know that many people are aware of this issue, but with the 2013 Holiday Season upon us, its important to know and hear this quick warning and cautionary guidance before you buy.

In the smartphone arena, if you’ve got an iPhone 4S or later, you’ll hit this issue. The iPhone 5 introduced the Lighting Connector. The classic 30 pin connector that’s been in use on Apple iDevices for just about 10 years. With a minor change of pin-outs with the introduction of a video signal and the removal of FireWire support, the 30 pin connector remained largely unchanged. It was so constant, that it lead to the creation of a whole industry – one of iPhone, iPod and iPad accessories.

When the Lightning connector was introduced with the introduction of the iPhone 5, that industry took a huge hit. None of the established accessories would work with the new iDevices, at least not with out an adapter, and then, not all of the original functionality of the new device would work with the older accessory.

Gadgets

With Android devices, you don’t get as much of this. Over the past 5+ years, Android’s microUSB connector has been pretty constant. However, it doesn’t have the longevity and history that Apple devices do. While that doesn’t mean as much as Google’s strict compatibility guidelines, most Android users have been able to keep most of their accessories over the 7 major releases of Android (Donut to Kitt-Katt).

So what’s the best thing to do?

That’s a great question. If you buy someone a new version of something be it a smartphone, tablet or MP3 player, you need to be aware that you might be forcing the recipient of the gift to buy themselves either an adapter or to buy themselves new accessories. Speakers and such may work very well with an adapter. Some of the more customized or function specific accessories – car kits, cradles and the like, for example – will likely need to be replaced or simply done without if replacements don’t exist.

The one thing that I’d like everyone to take from this particular article is that depending on how “deep” the gift recipient is into their device(s), getting them a new version of the device is often going to change what they can use from their current accessory stash and will effect what they may have to buy to get key functionality back. The major expense isn’t always the device or cellular plan, it might be the accessories that they have to leave behind in order to use the new device.

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox

Find us on Facebook