No Band for You!

You come back, one year!

microsoft-band

The wearables market isn’t an easy one; and its one that for many, still remains untamed. I spent a great deal of time last year covering the wearables market.

The first device I reviewed in this year long series was the Microsoft Band. In the end, at least before the Apple Watch was released, I considered it to be the go to device that I would have recommended to everyone, largely because (it had)

  • An inexpensive point of entry
  • A cross platform set of apps
  • An easy to use UI and smartphone app

When, a year later, Microsoft released Band 2, I felt vindicated – at least for my initial recommendation – because a second release of Band meant that Microsoft intended to stay in the market, at least for a while.

Yeah… about that…

Microsoft announced earlier this week that it is pulling Band 2 from all of its Stores and won’t be releasing a Band 3 this year.

Later, Microsoft also removed Band’s SDK from their site, which makes sense, since they’re no longer selling the device. They also appear to have disbanded the software team that was tasked with bringing Band in to Windows 10 as a native device and the hardware team responsible for design and engineering of Band hardware.

The one thing that Microsoft is NOT doing, however is dropping Microsoft Health. Microsoft still intends to provide that software and service to users of other fitness bands.

However, Apple Watch users, or those MS Health users looking to switch to Apple Watch, shouldn’t get their hopes up. It’s very unlikely that Apple will provide an API that would permit 3rd party support of Apple Watch with Microsoft Health or any other health monitoring application.

So you can put Microsoft Band into the heap of dead and dying tech revealed recently, including, of course, Blackberry manufactured hardware.

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FEATURE REVIEW – iPhone 7 Plus

After the initial out of the box experience, here are my thoughts on the iPhone 7 Plus

Introduction
I’m going to try to make this quick, as I’m currently working on a number of longer articles for Soft32 that I really want to get done in September as opposed to October; but to be honest, this one really can’t wait. If I don’t get it posted, its value and relevance will really fall; and I just can’t have that…

I’ve been an iPhone user on and off since 2008. I originally bought an iPhone 3G (or what could now be called the iPhone 2). It was the second iPhone that Apple released; and back in the day it you had a choice of two (2) colors – white or black. I was at a local AT&T store and while I wanted black, I had to take white, as all of the black phones were sold out. It’s also the last time that I actually stood in a line to buy a phone.

Things have changed a great deal in the last eight years.

I’m running with an iPhone 7 Plus this time around. I’ve had it for about a week; and I’ve developed a few opinions about it. Let’s take a quick sec and run over them… Shall we..??

Size, Finish and Form Factor
Damn, this phone is big.

I remember back in the day – and we’re talking 2004 to 2006 time frame – having a device with a screen larger than four (4) inches (measured diagonally) was a dream to view content with; but was considered a major issue because it completely interfered with one hand operation. The iPhone 7 is 4.7″ diagonally and the 7 Plus is 5.5 inches diagonally.

I found the following picture of all of the iPhones that Apple has ever released. It clearly shows the change in size over the past nine (9) years.

iphone-history

The iPhone 7 can still be used one handed, but requires a larger hand to really make this work without risking some serious and possibly painful, stretching. The iPhone 7 Plus simply can’t be used with one hand. At 5.5″ diagonally, the form factor (often) requires two hands to hold the device, let alone, use it.

I’ve got a serious case of arthritis in my hands, and to be honest, I don’t even think about trying to use the 7 Plus with one hand. For me – and I would think most of the Plus user base – it just isn’t possible.

If there was one thing that hit me when I got into my 7 Plus, it was the size of the device. My wife has the iPhone 6s Plus, and has been using that for a year; and of course I’ve occasionally used it; but it’s a different story when your daily driver is as large as the Plus size devices.

I know I will get used to it, but this is going to take me some time. I need to stop stretching my hands across the device to the upper left corner, trying to reach things. It’s just not going to happen…

With the device’s increased size, I’ve noticed that its rounded edges are a problem. The device is so smooth that it really feels like it wants to fall out of my hands when I’m holding it. If there was one thing that I would change about this device, it would be squaring off the rounded edges, making it a bit similar to the design of the iPhone SE and the iPhone 4/4s/5/5s. It would just make it a lot easier to grip and hold on to.

At the end of the day, the screen size is a huge reason to upgrade, but it makes the device a lot bigger (duh…) and it requires a bit of getting used to, especially for someone with arthritis issues, like me.

I purchased the matte black iPhone 7 Plus. My wife got the jet black iPhone 7 Plus. Both colors are VERY black. This is not charcoal, or a dark space gray. This is black.

My wife’s jet black 7 Plus arrived on 2015-09-27. The best way to describe it is as having a black, glossy, glass finish all the way around. The back looks as though it is covered with the same glass as the front is. It looks beautiful.

The Full 360
Here are some comparison photos of the iPhone 6, the iPhone 6s Plus and the Matte Black, iPhone 7 Plus.

dsc_1317 dsc_1318
From left to right, the front of the iPhone 6, iPhone 7 & iPhone 6s Plus From left to right, the backs of the iPhone 6, iPhone 7 & iPhone 6s Plus
dsc_1319 dsc_1320
From left to right, the bottom of the iPhone 6, iPhone 7 & iPhone 6s Plus From left to right, the left side of the iPhone 6, iPhone 7 & iPhone 6s Plus
dsc_1321 dsc_1324
From left to right, the tops of the iPhone 6, iPhone 7 & iPhone 6s Plus From left to right, the right side of the iPhone 6, iPhone 7 & iPhone 6s Plus

Home Button
This is a huge change in iPhone 7; and aside from the loss of the headphone jack (see below…), is perhaps the biggest, most controversial change in iPhone 7. 7 Plus.

The Home Button is no longer a physical button. The TouchID sensor is hidden under a haptic enabled, Force Touch/ 3D Touch, round, recessed section of the screen. User adjustable, haptic feedback simulates a click or press when you press on it with your fingertip.

The “button” works via capacitive touch. There is no physical, depressive hardware or button mechanism that depresses when you push the button. Like the trackpad on a MacBook or MacBook Pro equipped with a compatible trackpad, the new home button simulates a press when you “push” it.

I’ve noticed that while this is similar to the experience and feeling on the MacBook or MacBook Pro that’s equipped with a Force Touch trackpad, its simply does NOT work the same way. The trackpad “click” feels like you’ve actually clicked a trackpad. The feeling you get from the Home Button on the iPhone 7/ 7 Plus does NOT feel like you’ve pushed the Home Button on an iPhone 6s/ 6s Plus or earlier, and it never will.

While you WILL get used to this change over time, it’s the miniaturization of the haptic engine and the other components in the “button” that make this implementation of this technology different. It works on the trackpads because everything is a bit bigger, there’s more surface area to work with and the vibration from the haptic engine can be applied to a larger area and has a better chance to dissipate a bit to help simulate a depressed click, all without any physical, moving parts.

Because it has no moving parts, AND requires a capacitive connection, you can’t get a press out of the button with a finger nail. You have to have a physical, flesh to button connection. This coupled with the new click feel, is going to require some getting used to.

As a quick aside, iOS 10 also implements a, “press home to unlock,” process. This was done in large part due to complaints that Apple received from users of the iPhone 6s/ 6s Plus who indicated that the performance of the touch sensor on those phones was too good, unlocking the device before they had a chance to read all of the notifications on the lock screen. You can “disable” this somewhat by changing the Home Button behavior in Accessibility Settings.

You’re going to be pressing the Home Button a lot more, so you can either get used to it all, or change the settings to better match the way you work. Your call…

Headphone Jack
First things first… Apple did NOT simply cover up the headphone jack on the iPhone 7/ 7Plus with the new, left side speaker grill. They removed the jack and all the associated hardware from the device completely. Please note that drilling a hole in your iPhone 7/ 7 Plus looking to “activate” the “hidden” jack under the speaker grill is only going to destroy your new iPhone. There is no hidden jack.

Plainly put – drilling a hole in your phone is just a mark of stupidity. Don’t do it. Period. The headphone jack has been removed from the iPhone 7/ 7 Plus, not hidden.

That nasty bit out of the way, the big question is, “how has this affected me?”

The answer is, “not much at all.”

I love music. It’s a key part of my life and a large part of who I am. I’ve got songs – originals and covers – running through my head all day, every day. Literally.

The main place I listen to any audio content is my car; and I’ve been listening to it via lightning connector/ USB cable connected to my car radio for about five (5) years. The only time I’ve ever really used any of the ear buds I’ve received with any of my iPhones – or any smartphone, for that matter – is when I’ve needed to make a phone call while having both hands free (and I wasn’t in my car). I very rarely listen to music at the office, as someone is likely to say something to me, and I’m not going to hear them if I’m plugged in. At home, I play audio through desktop speakers set at the appropriate volume level.

Now, that isn’t to say that I will NEVER use a set of headphones at office. However, when I do, I’ve got that covered. iPhone 7 and 7 Plus both come with a Lightning to 3.5mm Headphone Jack Adapter (a $9 accessory). If I want to listen to music at work, I’ll put that adapter on the wired end of the Beats Wireless On-Ear Headphones I bought on Amazon.com.

Yes, they can also work wirelessly; but I never use the wireless connection any longer. I’ve had too many problems. The wired connection is much more reliable. So, again, I’ll just put the adapter on the AUX cord that came with the headset and leave it there.

While lots of folks hate change; this one isn’t bothering me much. At the end of the day, we’re going to do the same thing that we did when headphone jacks moved from 1/4 inch to 3.5mm… we’re going to get an adapter, attach it to our favorite headset, and we’re going to get over the fact that the jack we’re used to is gone.

Camera
There are a great deal of camera improvements in the iPhone 7/ 7 Plus. The table below compares the camera in the last two iterations of Apple’s flagship phone.

Feature

iPhone 7

iPhone 6s

Sensor Size 12MP 12MP
Aperture WA: f1.8, T: f2.8 f2.2
Zoom Optical: 2x, Dig: 10x Digital Only: 5x
OIS Both Plus Only
Lens 6 Element 5 Element
Lens Cover Sapphire Crystal Sapphire Crystal

I’m a decent amateur photographer, and quite honestly, the above features are the ones that I’m really interested in and concerned about when it comes to the camera. These are the core camera features that anyone really interested in the camera will really care about. The faster rating (f1.8 vs f2.2) on the iPhone 7’s rear camera means that it should take better pictures in low light situations. The camera should also be better at capturing sports or other fast action shots.

To be honest, these are all still photo feature related. While the ability to take video is also nice, I don’t do it much. Thankfully for me, though, the video camera feature set between the iPhone 7/ 7 Plus and the iPhone 6s/ 6s Plus hasn’t changed. It’s the same as last year’s model.

Since I’m coming from an iPhone 6 to the iPhone 7, I haven’t really had a chance to take or play with Live Photos. To be blunt and honest, I’m not impressed. Live Photos are three to six second movies that your phone takes. The photo appears as a still until you either press and hold or apply Force Touch to your screen.

Live Photos is turned on by default and are taken in Photo (default) mode. I’ve found them to be some of the worst photos AND videos I’ve ever taken. The still shots in them are mediocre at best and the videos are often blurry. When most stills are in the 175kb to 512kb size range and Live Photos are about 2MB in size, they are really nothing more than a waste of space, I’ve found. Unless you’re in a really well lit, naturally lighted area, I’d stay away from them.

Other photos I’ve taken with the iPhone 7 Plus look really good. Take a look at the table below. I’ve got two photos of the same subject taken with both devices and their Info sheets, below. Both photos are of our new puppy, Maggie, a havanese puppy, about 16 weeks old.

img_0102 img_0102-info
img_5820 img_5820-info

There’s nothing special done to either of these photos. I haven’t applied any filters or retouched them in any way. You can see the photo taken with the iPhone 7 Plus has much more detail and is a much clearer, more focused, sharper picture. That’s what a faster lens with a longer focal length and 4 additional mega pixels will get you. The quality and improvement is unquestionable.

When you look at these two sample photos, it’s clear which is the better one – the one taken with the iPhone 7 Plus. It also clearly illustrates why the camera on a smartphone is perhaps the single biggest reason why people upgrade their phones every 12 to 24 months. Their phone is the camera they carry with them everywhere they go.

When you make quality jumps like f1.8 from f2.2 and 6.6mm from 4.5mm, upgrading your smartphone to get a better camera is easy to understand. While I’d quite honestly rather have my DSLR with me to take pictures, this point and shoot camera on the iPhone 7 Plus is really a good substitute in a much more convenient form factor.

NOTE: I’m going to say just this about the pending Portrait mode and the Gaussian blur effect it performs – the blur needs to be more pronounced than some of the sample photos I’ve seen taken by those individuals running the update on an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus. Currently, the effect doesn’t feel strong enough to me. You can see some sample pictures published on c|net, here.

I am NOT currently running the iOS 10.1 beta that has this update, though I have access to the software. I wanted to be able to review my iPhone 7 Plus without the possible issues that may come from early betas of this first major update to iOS 10.

Battery Life
The iPhone 7/ 7 Plus and the iPhone 6s/ 6s Plus are effectively the same size. Each corresponding model in each device series has the same dimensions as the other. However, the inner workings are a bit different and are laid out differently. As I understand it, the batteries in the 7/ 7 Plus is slightly bigger than the batteries in the 6s/ 6s Plus.

Battery specs for the iPhone 7 Plus and the iPhone 6s Plus are below. You’ll notice that the battery ratings for the 6s Plus are slightly better than the 7 Plus. While the battery is slightly bigger, the lower battery life ratings can be accounted for in the updated A10 processor, extra 1GB of RAM (the 7 Plus has a total of 3GB of RAM where the 6s Plus has 2GB of RAM) and the higher resolution display.

Feature

iPhone 7 Plus

iPhone 6s Plus

Improvement 1 hour Longer

N/A

Talk Time – 3G Up to 21 hours on 3G Up to 24 hours on 3G
Standby Up to 16 days Up to 16 days
Internet Use Up to 13 hours on 3G
Up to 13 hours on LTE
Up to 15 hours on Wi-Fi
Up to 12 hours on 3G
Up to 12 hours on LTE
Up to 12 hours on WiFi
Wireless Video Playback Up to 14 hours Up to 14 hours
Wireless Audio Playback Up to 60 hours Up to 80 hours

During the day, I take and make a moderate amount of phone calls. I have some moderate app use. I play a couple hours of games; and I’ve always got at least one smartwatch connected to it – either the Olio Model One or the Apple Watch Series 0. With the iPhone 6, I found that my device’s charge would drop to between 15 to 20% power by the end of the day. I’ve found that with the iPhone 7 Plus, I can make it through the day with well over 55% charge left. That’s about 1/3 more battery life. I find that it also charges back up fairly quickly. I’m usually back up to 95-100% by the time I’m back home from work (a 45 to 60 minute ride).

Conclusion
I have some work to do getting used to the increased device size of the iPhone 7 Plus. I know I’ll get there; but right now, knowing that I have to finish adjusting and have to learn to feel comfortable using two hands to run the device instead of just one will take some time.

The jury is still out for me on the Home Button. We’ll have to wait and see what happens. I’d like to “like” how the device functions since I’m technically stuck with this until at least next year.

I’ve moved on from the loss of the headphone jack. You should too. It’s not that big a deal… really. As long as I have the 3.5mm to Lightning adapter on my Beats headphones audio cord, I’m fine. If not, then I have to go across the street from the office to the Apple Store to get a new one.

The camera is really great, but I need to spend some more time taking pictures with it. It’s a huge improvement over the iPhone 6 that I’ve been using and its enhancements warrant some serious work.

Battery life on the 7 Plus is decent. While its somewhat less than the 6s Plus, its enhanced components can explain that away, and honestly, it’s a lot better knowing that I’ve got extra battery power to get me through the day when I really need it.

The iPhone 7 Plus would have been a good upgrade for me regardless of the metrics or reasons and results of my first week of use. The device has a larger screen, bigger battery, a better camera and an extra 1GB of RAM (for a total of 3GB) than my iPhone 6, so this was a slam dunk based on those older device specs. Everything else I got was just gravy…

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Olio Keeps Trying

You have to hand it to a company that keeps on trying…

Over the past year, I’ve done a lot with wearables. Again, here’s all the links to the articles I’ve written on them.

Microsoft Band

Fitbit Surge

Pebble Time

Apple Watch Sport

Olio Model One

Waterproof-Watch-5

This list is in sharp contrast to the state of the wearable’s market now. It’s not as prolific, and its currently stagnating a bit, as everyone – and every device – that’s still in the market tries to decide where the next step is.

Case in point – the Olio Model One. It looks awesome; but at the time of review, if you tried to use it past a 2-4 hour window, you’d be out of luck. The battery life was atrocious. It was effectively, unusable due to the battery burning through a charge, especially if it was out of range of your phone.

However, Olio hasn’t given up on the Model One; and despite me being bitterly disappointed and down on it out of the gate, I continue to be hopeful as new software updates come out for it.

Another case in point – Olio has recently released Model One Software Version 1.4; and boy..! What a difference a release (or two) makes!

Olio has included the following in this update:
Gesture – You can now select ‘High’ for a sensitive gesture response, ‘Medium’ for the current default that you’ve been experiencing with gesture on, or ‘Low’ for a less sensitive gesture response and optimum battery life. The gesture feature is located in Settings on your Model One.
Bluetooth – This update also includes improvements to Bluetooth connectivity,
Overall UI Improvements,
Battery Life optimizations for iPhone users

I’ve noticed the following with this update:

1. Battery Life – Battery life is improved by 3x. I can now make it through the day – 12-14 hours without having my watch run out of power. The device is now (in the most basic terms) usable. I can use it without having to recharge or worry about if and when (not it… WHEN) my watch will run out of power.

I still have to make certain that I take my phone with me to meetings. Bluetooth will still go haywire, trying to reconnect to my phone if I’m out of range…

This still needs to improve. The Model One can’t be considered a success here until it can go at LEAST 24-36 hours without needing a charge. Heck, the Microsoft Band version 1 (Part 1 Part 2) can do that.
2. Bluetooth – Yes, it connects quicker. Yes, it seems to find my phone better; but when it loses connectivity, it still searches like mad.

What needs to happen here is that if the phone goes out of range or the watch “loses” the phone, the watch needs to check your schedule. If you have an appointment during the time of communication loss, then the watch shouldn’t try to reconnect until after the appointment ends. Then it should try three times on its own, and then give up. The watch face should turn red (or give some other visual clue that its lost connectivity and has stopped trying on its own to connect) and then give the user the opportunity to reconnect manually. Olio Assist can house the settings.
3. Gesture Sensitivity – High is too high, low is too low, and medium… can be a weird combination of the two at times. Unfortunately, for me, medium is NOT “just right.”

Stay tuned. Olio promises many more updates and improvements to the Model One in the coming months. I’ll have an update on those that make an impact posted to Soft 32 as soon as I can.

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Smartwatches for Everyone!

You Can Turn ANY Watch into a Smartwatch with Chronos

Chronos

Those of you that know me and have been following me over at LEAST the past year know that for me, 2015 was the year of the smartwatch. I reviewed the following smartwatches in 2015:

Microsoft Band
Part 1

Fitbit Surge
Pebble Time
Apple Watch Sport
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Olio Model One

There were good and bad smartwatches in this list. I’ve really chosen the Apple Watch Sport as my daily wearable. I’ve been wearing it more consistently than any other smartwatch that I reviewed. Both the Microsoft Band and the Fitbit Surge have been retired. I gave the Pebble Time to a friend of mine at Church; and I’m still working with Olio on what I would still consider some issues with the Model One.

However, if you have a standard, non-smartwatch, watch that you are totally in love with and don’t want to give up or put into semi-retirement but really want a smartwatch, then you really need to take a look at Chronos.

Chronos is a 3x33mm disk that adheres to the back of ANY watch via micro-suction. Its water resistant , non-magnetic, and provides both vibration and colored LED light notifications. In addition to this, it has an accelerometer for fitness tracking, allows you to use your watch as a remote for your smartphone’s camera and music player. You can even use gesture controls to skip songs. If you’ve misplaced your phone, you can use Chronos to “ping” it to help you locate it.

Chronos on Watch

Chronos has Bluetooth 4.0 LE with a 50 foot range; and has a rechargeable lithium polymer battery with a battery life range of up to three (3) days. The device charges via wireless charging, so you can charge it while it’s still connected to your favorite watch of choice.

The best thing here is the price – at least at the time of this writing. Chronos will begin shipping in Spring of 2016 and retails for an MSRP of $129. If you preorder yours now, you can get it for $40 off, or $89.

I’ve requested a review sample from Chronos and hope to hear back from them soon, as I feel this would make a wonderful, final edition to our Wearables Roundup. Stay tuned to Soft32 for more information, and hopefully, a full review!

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Olio Releases Model One Firmware Updates 1.1.71

Well… At least they’re making an effort…

DlAmpsIrIf you recall, my review of the Olio Model One wasn’t very flattering. I still think its problematic, and something that most people probably should wait on purchasing. However… they ARE trying; and for that, their grades are improving. Recently, you may recall, they released a firmware update. Well, Olio has released another firmware update, updating their Model One to version 1.1.71.

Version 1.1.70 was released on 2016-01-22. Version 1.1.71 was released on 2016-01-23. Olio again caught a bug, post release, and followed it up with a quick fix. While this shows diligence – to an extent – airing their laundry like this probably isn’t helping them very much… Olio should have kept the information to themselves and just released version 1.1.71 without saying anything. However, the following is a list of updates and fixes that have been released.

  • ALS (Automatic Light Sensor) fixes: All watches should function normally on Auto brightness.
  • Watches rebooting: We have implemented a fix for those of you who saw your watch frequently rebooting.
  • Rapid battery drain: You should now expect a full 12 hours of battery life with Gesture On, and 18+ hours with Gesture Off.
  • Incorrect weather: The weather Complication should no longer display question marks, and the current weather should be accurate.
  • Repeating alarms: Repeating alarms will now get set properly.
  • Images not loading: Watch hands, Bluetooth or battery icons, and other image assets should now load consistently and immediately.

Please remember that the Olio Model one has a passive firmware updating system. You don’t download anything to either your (iPhone or Android) phone. Instead, charge both your watch and your phone, and make sure they are connected via Bluetooth in the Olio Assist app. If your phone app does not say connected, restart Bluetooth on your watch to reconnect. If this does not resolve the connection, please email Olio support and they will assist you.

As mentioned above, unresponsive watches should be fixed with this update. If you your watch turns off on its own, Olio would like you to contact them. They will likely want to take your timepiece back to their San Francisco headquarters for servicing. If it can’t be easily fixed, Olio will replace the watch at no cost to you. Please contact support@oliodevices.com for more information.

Olio has more to offer by the end of January 2016. They are in the process of updating both iOS and Android versions of Olio Assist; and those may already be out by the time this article is published. Please check the appropriate app store for an update if it hasn’t already come down to you.

Olio’s next firmware update will come in mid-February and is currently scheduled to include the following:

  1. Bluetooth enhancements
  2. Navigation in Control Hub (it does currently exist as a notification)
  3. Voice control
  4. The ability to update various watch preferences from the phone apps
  5. Time zones
  6. Silence notification Rule improvements

I’ll have more on all of this at that time, or as I update my Model One. The passive update system is difficult at best, as there’s currently no way to download the firmware update and push it to your phone. Somehow the stars have to align just right before that happens, and there really isn’t any way to set that into motion. It either happens or it doesn’t.

I’ve suggested that Olio needs to provide an “advanced mode” that will allow people to update their watch on their own, but they have so far refused to provide that level of service. While I understand their reasoning why – this stuff is all just supposed to work in the background without any forceful action on the user’s part – it doesn’t “just work.” I’ve had my watch sitting on my desk now for at least two days waiting for this to happen.

So far… Nuthin!

This isn’t supposed to be rocket science; and I’ve followed all of the instructions that I’ve been given. I have no idea why this is such a difficult process. Unfortunately, this is partially escalated due to all of the problems and issues that the Model One has.

If the product were functioning as designed, then there likely wouldn’t be a need for any kind of “advanced mode” that allowed you to download and push a firmware update to the watch.

That may just be me; but I suspect that it isn’t. I’m pretty certain that the issues, problems, frustrations and concerns that I’ve got are ones that are being voiced by every single Model One owner.

If you have any ideas, or additional information on any of this, I’d love to hear from you. You can reach me via the discussion area below. I monitor all of my postings here on Soft32, so it’s easy to get in touch with me.

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Olio Released Model One Firmware Updates 1.1.61 & 1.1.63

olio updateOlio recently released firmware updates to help address bugs and issues in their smartwatch, the Model One.

If you recall, I recently published a review of Olio’s Model One smartwatch. Unfortunately, I declared it pretty much one of the worst train wrecks I’ve ever seen in an electronic accessory, and most certainly, the worst product I’ve looked at in 2015. My initial reaction was so poor that I recommended everyone stay away from it for now.

Recently, I’ve received noticed of not one, but two, device firmware updates for the Model One, direct from Olio. Firmware version 1.1.61 was released on 2015-12-25 and addressed a number of different issues. You can see the specifics on those, directly below. Firmware version 1.1.63 was released to resolve a firmware update issue where the watch may get stuck in “update mode, ” and not recover. In this case, as long as the device is connected to power and showing connected in Olio Assist, Olio says version 1.1.63 can be passively downloaded to the watch and the watch updated, resolving the issue. Watches successfully updated to firmware version 1.1.61 without issue would simply update to 1.1.63, and would see no additional issues or new functionality other than what came with version 1.1.61.

Thankfully, I didn’t experience this particular issue. My watch updated to versions 1.1.61 and 1.1.63 without a hitch.

Bugs and Issues Resolved:

  • Bluetooth on your watch and phone settings should no longer randomly disconnect. If it does, it should automatically reconnect.
  • Improved gesture sensitivity and optimization.
  • Added tap only setting on watch so that if gesture sensitivity doesn’t work well, you can put it on tap-only mode to save battery life.
  • Bug fixed that can cause the watch to run out of battery in less than 4 hours.
  • Automatically setting all watches to medium brightness to prevent the ALS from causing some screens to turn off. A long-term fix to use auto brightness is in development.
  • Fixed accelerometer bug that can cause the watch not to turn on via gesture. The watch will reboot when the accelerometer is in improper state.
  • Implemented synchronization protocol to ensure all Android phones display accurate time within 10 seconds. Some Android phones don’t send notifications continuously over Bluetooth, so the time update takes a while to send.
  • Fixed bug that can cause the wrong caller to be displayed on the watch during phone calls.
  • Fixed bug that causes the “updating” screen to stay on too long when updating day/night.
  • Fixed bug where “auto” mode didn’t transition properly in day/night mode.
  • Fixed bug that can cause notification actions to not work properly when notifications first came in on watch.

Based on the information above, some of the big problems that have been causing the watch to run through its full battery charge in four hours or less has been resolved. I’ll be looking at this VERY carefully, as it speaks to how the device uses Bluetooth as well as power management.

Battery life still remains the biggest issue with the Olio Model One. Even though I’ve got the latest updates on my watch, I’ve still had to have my watch sit on its charger part of the day today. (and the thing still gets bloody hot when it charges…)

Honestly, things are getting a bit better, as the update from 1.1.61 to 1.1.63 for me happened over night as planned – and was the first firmware update to happen this way. Every other update I’ve had to babysit and try to coax along. The battery life does seem a bit better, but not much.

There seems to be a long interval of time between 100% charge and 90-85% charge, and then after that, the device’s charge level drops like a rock to the mid 40%’s, where it again sits for about an hour before dropping like a rock again to the mid 20%’s. From there, it’s a gradual and steady decline to the end. I’ve also noticed that when my watch hits one of these plateaus, I can often expect it to restart on its own, out of nowhere, and when it comes back, the charge rate is much reduced (by as much as 15%).

Olio is also working on other issues, and has other updates planned. Items up for release next include, but aren’t limited to the following:

Known Issues with Pending Fixes

  • The iOS app can show disconnected when the phone setting and watch settings say connected. If this happens, turn Bluetooth off on the watch, wait five seconds, and then turn it back on. If the issue persists, kill the Olio Assist app, turn Bluetooth off on the watch, restart the phone app, and turn Bluetooth on the watch back on.
  • In “gesture off” mode, the watch will detect some wrist turns as taps. We are tuning tap detection to prevent this.
  • Despite the watch being on the charger for a long time, it might show less than 100% charged. The wireless charging firmware stops charging the watch when the battery reaches 100%, and does not restart until the battery drops below 90%. We are working on an update to the firmware that will keep the battery topped off without degrading the battery health.
  • We have identified a state that can cause the watch to charge slower than it should (>90 minutes). We are working on a fix to prevent this state from occurring.
  • It is possible that your watch will enter a state where the screen does not turn on. This is a known issue with the ALS calibration and we are working on a permanent fix. In the meantime, if you notice this issues, shine a bright light (your mobile flashlight should work) to get the screen to turn on, and set the brightness to medium.
  • When entering a new time zone, watches paired to iOS can take up to two hours to update to the new time zone. We have identified a new way to update the watch time from iOS and are working to implement that change. Temporarily, restarting Bluetooth on the watch will reset the time.

I’ll keep everyone posted on how things go with some of these updates. I still can’t recommend this smartwatch to anyone, even those that are used to beta testing and to living on the bleeding edge of technology. It’s just a bit too cold and bloody out here…

Related Posts:

Review – Olio Model One

The last candidate in our Smartwatch Roundup is here – Meet the Olio Model One…

Introduction
Wearables are the thing for 2015. Nearly every major smartphone manufacturer, including Apple, Microsoft (who delivered MS Band and MS Band 2 in less than a year’s time), Samsung, Motorola, and LG to name a few; not to mention fitness and GPS companies like Garmin, Nike and Fitbit have released a band or smartwatch in 2015.

Wearables, and in particular, smartwatches, are a hot commodity right now. Those that have been successful have been hard to get. The Apple Watch certainly falls in that category. The MS Band, at least back in November and December of 2014, also qualify.

However, there have been a few new players enter the market. Some of these, like the Tag Heuer Connected represent the high end of the smartwatch market. Others, like the Olio Model One, however, also firmly fall into this category, but unlike the Tag Heuer, are smartphone agnostic. They don’t prefer a particular flavor of smartphone OS; and its here that we’re going to end our smartwatch journey; because… it has arrived.

The Olio Model One. Its luxurious. Its waterproof. Its simply stunning. Let’s take a look at it and see how it stands up in a new market, but one that is quickly maturing and see if it’s the smartwatch for you.

Hardware
This is perhaps the one and ONLY area of the Model One that Olio got right. The watch casing and the band on the Model One are really exceptional. If there’s one area of the product that is going to pull a lot of interest from current and potential customers, it’s the band and watch casing. If there’s one area that might make me not return the device to Olio and request a refund, it’s going to be the casing and the band.

In fact, its perhaps the only reason why I haven’t returned the device at this point. The device looks and feels great. It looks like a product that costs as much as it does, and it really just oozes luxury.

Nothing looks or feels cheap on the Model One. The screen looks great, despite the touch screen issues (see below). The casing is solid and well put together. The watch has some heft to it, giving the device the feel of something special.

Check out the pictures below. Once you see this thing, I know you’ll agree, this is an awesome looking device.

 

Unfortunately, that’s all the good I have to say about the hardware. Once you get past the surface, it all goes south.

I’ve outlined a number of different hardware related functionality issues, below. If you are interested in the Model One, please don’t order one until you have the opportunity to read through everything that I’ve outlined. Based on what I know about the device, the issues that I’ve outlined below, and the one customer-wide, web-based quality call that Olio has done to address customer concerns and issues, it’s clear that the problems that I’ve outlined are NOT isolated.

There’s also no way to take a screen shot of the device that I can see, as it has NO hardware buttons and no way to view the contents of the screen in Olio Assist. All of the device shots I’ve taken have been with a physical camera.

Watch Software & Complications
Olio’s product pages all show a continuous, moving second hand. It flows around the watch face with a sense of elegance that really shows off the luxury points of the Model One.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to make YOUR Model One’s second hand move in a continuous, elegant, sweeping motion. The second hand on my Model One “ticks” as a second hand would on a mechanical, analog watch. This is nice, but why the Model One won’t mimic this – when it should clearly be an easy get – is beyond me. According to Olio Assist, the watch face isn’t customizable. Each Bespoke watch face is preconfigured for your type and color (Steel, Black, Yellow Gold, or Rose Gold) of watch, and cannot be changed (other than day/ night settings and its activity streams that help create a unique face, each day.

Notifications
The Notifications complication is the default watch screen for the Model One. As you can see from this screen, you get the time of day, the activity bars and the date in mm.dd.yyyy format. When a notification is sent to the Model One, its most easily seen here. You can also most easily see both Temporal Streams (see Notifications in the Issues and Problems section, below), Early and Later.

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The Model One Notifications Complication The Notifications Screen
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Tap on an individual Notification and get the details Swipe to the left, and get the ability to clear the Notification; but be careful. If you don’t do it right, you can dismiss the Notifications without seeing the Clear button, or you can move to the next Complication, OR you can get the Earlier Temporal Stream

The UI here looks nice. Its modern. Its semi-transparent. It’s also difficult to get to and work with.

Schedule
This is an interesting view of your daily calendar. The only issue I have with it is that as appointments come and go, they fall off the complication. This is good and bad. Its good, because the complication is only good for up to 12 hours at a time. It’s bad, because once an appointment has passed it falls off the display. If you were looking to see how busy you were today, this isn’t the day-view that you’d probably go to first. It is, however, GREAT at the beginning of your day, and as your appointments progress. Eventually, you end up with a blank display until the next day.

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Weather
This is probably the most interesting complication in the entire cache of displays on the watch. It’s not animated, and you shouldn’t expect any kind of animation out of any of the model one screens (except the second hand movement); but it will change based on changing weather conditions throughout the day.

The Weather complication divides your day into four quadrants morning, mid-day, afternoon and evening, and gives you general weather info for the day. The active quadrant, based on the hour hand, is highlighted, white.

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Alarm
You can set a single or repeating alarm with the Model One on this screen. I haven’t played with this at all, because, to be quite honest, the watch has never given me the opportunity to want or need an alarm to be set on the actual watch, largely because I’m not expecting it to have enough power to actually ring the alarm later (see Battery Life, in the Issues and Problems section, below).

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Timer
You can set a countdown timer with the Model One on this screen. Like Alarm, I haven’t used the Timer complication at all, because, quite honestly, I haven’t had enough battery life or power on the device to actually warrant playing with this. I’m just worried about the bloody thing having enough power to tell the time while I’m wearing it. Its nearly always run out of power before I’ve been able to get home and plug it in.

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Stopwatch
You can use your Model One as a stopwatch with this screen. This complication has turned on once or twice due to issues with the touch screen not being sensitive enough, or too sensitive and I’ve had issues stopping it or clearing it back to zero. Again, I’m not very trusting of using this complication because it’s going to burn battery power (and yes… battery life really IS that big of an issue Keep reading…).

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Companion Smartphone App
Originally, I had plans of taking you through the entire app. Lord knows I have enough screen shots of the software on my iPhone.

I’ve been in mobile devices for nearly my entire software QA career. I know mobile devices like the back of my hand, and all of my experience is telling me that Olio Assist needs work, some time to mature and is currently buggy.

I’m not going to show you everything. After going through the cache of screen shots I have, there are simply too many of issues and bugs and quirks that I’ve found to display them all. I will, however, provide you with some screen shots so you can see what the software looks like, and then see where some of the rough edges are.

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You choose a DND range, ideally so the watch doesn’t receive notifications and will save battery power. However, your battery will likely never last long enough to see this happen You choose calendars to tell Olio Assist to only provide appointment notifications for the noted calendars. However, I have yet to have any appointment notifications fire on my Model One. The setup process attempts to use your home and work locations from YOUR contact record on your phone. However, location services in Olio Assist don’t work right and you end up with the error dialog you see directly under this caption. If you want Olio Assist to know where you live, you have to enter the location in manually
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After you enter in your location manually, it can find your location and pinpoint it on a map. After it asks about your residential address, it asks about your work address and goes through the same process. This is the error message you see when you try to have Olio Assist use either your residential or work address out of your personal contact record, as I noted above. Again, you have to search for your address manually.
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After you enter in your location manually, it can find your location and pinpoint it on a map. The only way to get out of the “add address loop” is to tap Skip, which doesn’t make any sense. I should be asked if I’m done with addresses, and then be given an opportunity to add more, or move on. Skipping a step makes it seem as though none of the data that I just entered, found and identified will be used. Olio Assist asks you what kind of transportation methods you use, presumably so that it can provide you with the correct navigation directions. I have yet to see any evidence of this outside of setup, but with the battery problems I’ve had, I really haven’t pushed my luck and tried. Setup is completed. Note that there is a finish button, even though the progress indicator (the 4th of four progress icons, below the finish button) has been on the last or 4th bar the entire process.

What you’re seeing here is extremely immature device software. It’s clear to me that the testing process here wasn’t as robust as it could or should have been. Olio has a lot of work to do here. For the cost of the watch, I expected a very finished software product.

Instead what I got was an unwanted opportunity to be a beta tester.

Issues and Problems
As of this writing, I’ve had the Olio Model One for a little over a month. During that time, I’ve been able to wear it for approximately one (1) – yes, just ONE, single, solitary full day. I have a number of issues with the Model One that I purchased, and I’ve been in nearly constant contact with Olio’s Customer Care Lead, Cristina Hall. With everything that you see documented below, Olio has decided that my Model One is defective. They are in the process of preparing (flashing the latest software update, which as of this writing is not finished yet) a new Model One for me and will send it next day air. I’ll turn around a return of my original Model One after I receive the replacement. I’m expecting my replacement to arrive sometime between Thursday and Friday of the week of 2015-11-16.

However, I can tell you with 100% certainty, I’m extremely disappointed so far in the Olio Model One. For $695USD, one expects a better out of the box experience than what I’ve currently received. Up to this point, I’d pretty much consider this to be one of the worst customer experiences I’ve ever had with a piece of consumer electronics in the last five to seven years.

UPDATE: As with everything that’s been happening with Olio, the organization failed to deliver on its promise of delivering me an updated and preflashed watch when they said they were going to. Just before Thanksgiving, Olio indicated that they were going to send me a replacement watch and that it should arrive no later than Wednesday 2015-11-25.

The watch didn’t SHIP until 2015-11-25. It was supposed to ship over night, so with Thursday being a national holiday, that means it should have arrived no later than 2015-11-27.

It didn’t arrive until Monday 2015-12-02, a full two business days after I was promised it would arrive.

On 2015-12-07, a new communication came out from Olio announcing a new version of Olio Assist – the watch’s companion app – and a new watch firmware update. Its 2015-12-07 as I write these words, and I’m still waiting for the watch to update itself to the new watch firmware version, version 1.1.47.

According to Olio, in order for the watch to update, it needs to be charged at least to 50%, must be sitting on its wireless charger and be connected to your phone via Bluetooth. According to Olio, it should update to the latest version within three hours of these conditions being met, so after three hours (or overnight at the latest), one would expect to see a new firmware version on the watch.

I’ve been sitting here all day, working, literally waiting for the watch to update… and… nothing.

That MAY be because even though my watch says its connected to my iPhone, and my iPhone’s Bluetooth page in Settings says that its connected to the watch, Olio Assist says that the watch is disconnected.

When I contacted Olio about this, I was told to go into Settings on the watch and restart it, and then to make certain that no other Bluetooth device was connected (like my Apple Watch). I was told that having another device connected to it could prevent the watch from updating correctly and that disconnecting other devices and then restarting the watch should immediately kick off the update.

It didn’t… but even if it did, it would be hard to tell.

Olio doesn’t want updating the watch to be something that the user ACTIVELY pursues. They want maintenance activities like that to be handled by Olio Assist and the watch and be totally transparent to the user. I like that… if it worked.

There’s no UI to push updates to the watch at all. There’s no way for me to know if the update has been found and downloaded by my phone, and then transferred to my device. Olio can see all of that from their backend… but the end user doesn’t have ANY way to monitor check, or troubleshoot that. So, if it works, it works. If it doesn’t, you’re screwed, as you don’t get ANY kind of notification from the software that there’s even a new firmware available for your watch, let alone a way to monitor, push or troubleshoot the transfer and installation.

I admire this type of update method – making it totally transparent to the user; but there needs to be a way to push it from the end user side, just in case things get stuck.

Charging Issues
The Olio Model One charges hot. It charges VERY hot. Dangerously hot. Like, burn your skin or desktop, hot. I initially thought that it was only the initial charge. I was wrong; but not in the way that you might think.

Yes. The Olio Model One can charge hot. It can get burn your hands hot; but it doesn’t charge hot all the time, and it can cool down to an acceptable or understandable level while charging. However, every time my battery gets nearly or totally depleted, the next time I charge it, it charges hot.

Every time…

The big issue here is that the device can get dangerously hot. The best thing for you to do is to set the watch to charge on a surface you know won’t burn or catch fire and then wait until the watch is fully charged. After that, you should disconnect it, and then wait for it to cool before putting it on.

The other charging issue that I’ve noticed with the Olio Model One is that even when sitting on its charger, regardless of its charging level, the level of charge can both rise AND fall according to both Olio Assist and the watch itself. How one is supposed to charge the watch so it can be used during the day, gets a bit confusing after this.

UPDATE: I’ve been using – or trying to use – the Model One now for a few weeks. This morning (2015-12-17), I woke up and the watch was at 61% charge after sitting on its charger overnight. In total, it sat on its charger for over 8 hours. However, it showed connected to my iPhone via Bluetooth in Settings, in Olio Assist, and on the watch.

When I got to the office, the watch was reading 1% charge. Yes… Just 1%. I put it on its charger and it immediately went to 10% and then over the course of about 90 minutes, 15%. I left it on the charger and went to a 30 minute meeting. When I got back to my desk, it was at 14%. Still on the charger and about 30 minutes later, it was at 11%, then about 5 minutes after that it was at 10%.

I pulled that watch off the charger and it was very hot. In fact, it was almost too hot to handle.

I restarted the watch via the watch’s Settings, and it took about 10 minutes to come back. The display was strange looking after that, as it was trying to display the Notifications complication, but was clearly having trouble; but the display righted itself. It clearing was having issues due to the high heat level it developed while charging.

Now… after about 5 minutes after restart, I’ve watched the charge meter on the watch jump from 10% to 15% to 22% to now 26%, again, in under 7 minutes.

I’ve been concerned about an insufficient amount of current coming through the charging disc and USB cable, so I’ve stopped using a powered USB port on my computer (a ThinkPad T420 here at the office) to using a wall wart and AC current. It’s made a difference, but the device also charges much hotter, much more frequently now.

Battery Life
This is probably the most disappointing feature on the device, and its clearly related to the charging issues I’ve noted above. To put it quite bluntly – the battery life on the Olio Model One just sucks. On the original Model One that I received (I was sent a replacement unit), the battery life was 2-4 hours.

Yes. That’s right, not 24 hours; but two (2) to four (4) hours. Just 2 to 4 hours, and then the battery would go dead and the watch would be dead weight. According to Olio, the Model One has a maximum of 800 charging cycles for the life of its battery. There’s a huge problem with this.

When the battery needs charging four to six times a day, just to get you THROUGH the day so you can use the watch, you’re looking at a life span of 133.33 to 200 DAYS

Days. Not weeks or months… Days.

That means that the useful lifespan of the Olio Model One is about 4.5 MONTHS to just over 6.5 MONTHS before the battery will fail to take and hold a charge.

At one full cycle a day, the Olio Model One should last 2.20 years before the battery will fail to take and hold a charge.

That’s not long enough.

When a smartwatch costs between $595 and $1395, this is truly unacceptable. The Apple Watch starts at $399 and many people – including me – are busting a flange gasket over IT not holding a charge for more than 16 hours before running out of power (when it first came out). With a maximum life span of just over two years, even THAT’S a hell of a lot more than the Olio Model One.

You can get a LOT of traditional watch for $600 to $1400, and it won’t expire in four and a half months to two years. It will last you – potentially – years to DECADES with the proper care and battery changes.

While a computing component like a smartwatch will quickly lose its relevance in five years or less, at $600 to $1400, I’m expecting the Olio Model One to last well beyond five years. There’s no reason why it shouldn’t.

However, I have serious concerns about it surviving past Thursday next week, at the way this thing runs through battery cycles…

UPDATE: I had the watch on the other day and had put it on my wrist at 8am. I had purposely turned the Bluetooth radio off, as my phone was downstairs in my jacket, and I was upstairs in my office, charging the watch…again. I didn’t want the watch’s battery to drain or not to charge, so I turned off the device’s Bluetooth radio. Then, we went to Church, and I left the Bluetooth radio off.

I want to make certain everyone understand the timing around these events.

1. 8AM – Took Model One off the charger and put it on
2. 10:30AM – Left for Church
3. 12PM – Arrived back home
4. 12PM – Watch was dead

That’s a span of four (4) hours. The Bluetooth radio was OFF, and the Model One still managed to run through its battery.

Touch Screen Issues
I’ve been having a number of issues with the Model One’s touch screen. I’m not going to belabor these, either, and I’m quickly going to run them down and detail them out.

  1. Sensitivity
    You have to touch it just right, and in the right spots (which aren’t very well defined), in order to get the screen to react to your touches. Right out of the box, the touch screen is both under and over sensitive. You can quite honestly tap and swipe this thing for days and the device will just ignore you. Other times, it will jet past three or four screens with a single swipe. The screen is very difficult to control, and I’ve noticed that you have to develop just the right type of touch in order to have the device not only recognize your touch, but to move the way you want it to. This is NOT easy to master, and honestly, you should have to try so damn hard to get the device’s touch screen do what you want or intend.This is a driver issue, and Olio has already issued two firmware updates to address it. No doubt others will follow.
  2. Display On/ Off

The watch is supposed to turn on when you raise your wrist. It doesn’t do that consistently. The watch is supposed to stay on long enough for you to look at it and mentally register the contents of the display. It doesn’t do that consistently. More often than not, it doesn’t turn on when you raise your wrist, requires you to tap it MULTIPLE (like four to five) times before it WILL turn on, and then won’t stay on long enough.

This is a driver issue, and Olio has already issued two firmware updates to address it. No doubt others will follow.

With both of these issues active all the time, interacting with the watch has not been easy. In many cases, I’ve given up, looked at the time, ignored the notifications I’ve gotten and just given up.

Bluetooth and Pairing
The biggest reason why the Olio Model One has the battery issues that it does have is due to problems with its Bluetooth radio. The Bluetooth radio in the Model One has serious problems staying connected to my iPhone.

Bluetooth pairing is not easy with the Model One. The initial pairing of my original Model One took me well over 20 minutes to complete. (See below for a bit more information on the initial pairing experience.) The Model One and my iPhone 6 apparently just don’t see eye to eye… or each other for that matter. I have no idea why, and no answers from Olio on this.

After getting them paired and connected, I have found that both the Model One and my iPhone 6 fail to see each other at all, though this has improved a great deal over the past week or so. If they do happen to “bump into each other,” they often drop the connection later.

And the initial pairing… oy what a painful experience that was. I’ve gone through the setup process with the Model One four (4) times. Connectivity problems have had me resetting the watch and deleting the partnership between my watch and my iPhone, as well as deleting Olio Assist on my iPhone to insure that any app information and device information have been deleted.

That usually clears things up with other products. Not always the case with the Model One. After putting Olio Assist BACK on my iPhone 6, I’ve also had to quit Olio Assist and restart it on many occasions to either get the initial pairing to work, or to get the device to reconnect to my iPhone.

The Bluetooth radio is one of the weakest parts of the Model One. It’s one of the main reasons that the battery tanks so completely and so often. While Olio has made some in-roads to this with device firmware version 1.1.47, they still have a LONG WAY to go.

Notifications
If I go back and gather the same notification criteria that I outlined in my Microsoft Band Review, I can honestly say that the Olio Model One MOSTLY gets notifications right.

That is to say, you get notified when you think you’d get notified.

However, the Model One addresses notifications with a system similar to the Pebble Time. Notifications are grouped into two basic time streams – Earlier and Later.

Notifications that come in now, are automatically deposited into the Earlier stream (it’s an event that happened earlier). Upcoming appointments, weather forecasts and conditions, etc. are shown in the Later stream. This would be fine, if not for the Touch Screen issues I outlined above.

Viewing items from the Earlier or Later streams requires you to swipe either left or right from the left or right side of the screen to the opposite end. Earlier events are seen by swiping from the left side to the right side. Later, from the right to the left… if you can get the screen to recognize the input.

If you do, then you can look at the notification. You can tap on it to get additional information, or swipe it to the left to clear it. Again, this all works if you can get the touch screen to recognize your touches. Sometimes it will, sometimes it won’t.

I’ve learned that the best way to use the watch is to ignore the notifications entirely. The haptics on the device aren’t very noticeable, and there’s a good chance you’re going to miss the notification when it comes in, anyway.

Conclusion
Geez… where the hell do I start..??!!

Put bluntly, stay away from the Olio Model One.

The device doesn’t work; and no amount of discussion or verbal or printed rhetoric from the company can convince me that it does at this point. It’s also way too expensive to have issues like this… EVER.

The company clearly has some huge, HUGE technology hurdles to get past; and I’m really not certain that the company is going to make it long enough to see the issues resolved. This is a HUGE disappointment.

When you’re a technology company, providing an expensive, electronic accessory that realistically has a life span of three to five (3-5) years (if and when it works as designed) and should have a lifespan that goes well beyond even THAT, I see no way that the organization will be able to survive the technology problems it has and the bad press they WILL generate, given the current state of their product offering.

The watch charges hot, has issues taking and holding a charge, has a Bluetooth radio that won’t stay connected to the most popular smartphone in the US, and doesn’t handle notifications right due to its touch screen issues. Top that off with a price tag that is clearly out of line with its battery’s usable life span, and you’ve got a recipe for disaster.

Is it possible for Olio to get past all of this and be successful with the Model One..?

Yes. Yes it is.

However, it’s going to take a eureka moment on their end. They are going to have to make the current hardware work correctly. They’re going to have to fix the Bluetooth radio issues they have with the iPhone. They’re going to have to fix the charging issues they have. They’re going to have to resolve the battery life issues they have. They’re going to have to make their iPhone app smarter and more intuitive. They’re going to have to address device updates and pushing firmware to the watch. They’re going to have to handle notifications a bit better and make them a bit more actionable and recognizable.

That’s a lot to accomplish in what I’m seeing as a VERY short window of opportunity for them – months. Like, less than three (3) months short…

Why so short..? Well, if they don’t get all of their battery and charging issues cleared up by that time, most of the first shipment of Model One’s that were put into service will have surpassed or come close to surpassing their 800 charge cycle life spans, and the watches will be useless.

So… hang out with this one and let’s see how it goes.

Until then, you can admire the hardware. It’s gorgeous; but I’d admire it from afar… The default size of the band is a bit tight for me, and you really MUST go to a jeweler to have the band sized; but if the software was something that Olio totally struck out on, their hardware (case and band) was an out of the park home run.

It’s too bad, too.

With a device that’s just so gorgeous, so water resistant, so and well designed, it’s too bad that the software that drives it is such a dud.

Related Posts:

Feature Review – OS X 10.11 – El Capitan

Introduction

os_x_el_capitan_roundup

Security!

Stability!!

Give me these or give me, well… give me another operating system!

Out of the darkness and the despair, the cry of the people went up; and the benevolent wizards in the magic land called Cupertino heard them. They toiled long and hard. They worked day and night. They sent forth version after (public beta) version of their magic spells until finally on 2015-09-30, shortly after the final rendering that was heralded by the appearance of the blood moon… it was completed.

El Capitan… OS X 10.11… and the Wizards of Cupertino saw that it was good… and so, wishing to protect their progeny, they sent it forth…

If you have a Mac running OS X 10.10.x, then you can run Yosemite. Is it the operating system for you? Will it run well, even on a Late 2008 or Early 2009 MacBook? Does it offer the kind of performance boot and security enhancements that you’ve been looking for? Is it safe for you to upgrade, knowing that some apps might not be ready yet?

We’re going to take a look at these questions and others as we look at El Capitan and its natural progression and growth from Yosemite into, what Apple (and all the Wizards of Cupertino) hope will be the best version of their desktop OS yet.

Let’s see if we can wade through the hype (and yeah… my BS…) and take a look and see what El Capitan brings to the table. Is it worth putting on your Mac? Let’s find out…

Experience

It started with Yosemite; and Apple said it when they announced OS X El Capitan – they’ve called the name of the mountain; and given everyone a natural progression of what Yosemite was. El Capitan is what comes next.

I’m making a big deal about the name of the new OS and the name of the mountain that’s depicted as the default desktop wall paper in both OS X 10.10 and 10.11. The mountain is in the park; and the park’s most notable and biggest attraction is the mountain. By drawing this analogy between the mountain and both operating systems, Apple is basically telling you that OS 10.11 is a natural progression of OS X 10.10. And that’s basically true… at least from what I’ve been able to see of the new OS during the time that I’ve been able to use it.

Changes to OS X in El Capitan can really be divided into two different categories – Experience and Performance. El Capitan is a gives you even simpler, smarter ways to do the things you do the most with your Mac – Like working in multiple apps at the same time, searching for information, keeping tabs on your favorite websites, or checking email, or taking notes.

And there are some changes. All of them add value to the OS X experience. Some of them create issues and problems for users. I’ll touch on some of those later.

However, what you should take from this “tock” styled update, is that the El Capitan experience is familiar and something that nearly every Yosemite user is going to feel comfortable with; and (should be) instantly productive in (again, provided your core apps aren’t broken under El Capitan. I have more on that below…

Performance

Improvements under the hood make your Mac snappier and more efficient in all kinds of everyday tasks — from opening PDFs to accessing your email. And with Metal for Mac, you get faster and more fluid graphics performance in games, high-performance apps, and many other places.

In OS X El Capitan we’ve made all kinds of things run faster — like accessing email and launching or switching between apps. It’s these little things that make your Mac feel faster and more responsive. And we’ve brought Metal to Mac, so you experience more fluid performance in games, high-performance apps, and key system-level graphics operations.

Now things you do every day — like launching and switching apps, opening PDFs, and accessing email — are faster and snappier. OS X El Capitan makes your Mac feel more fluid and responsive.

  • Up to 1.4x faster app launch
  • Up to 2x faster app switching
  • Up to 2x faster display of first mail messages
  • Up to 4x faster pdf opening in preview

    Metal

One of the biggest developments and improvements in OS X 10.11 is Metal. Metal is a new graphics core technology. It gives games and apps near-direct access to the graphics processor on your Mac, allowing for enhanced performance and a richer graphical experience. Metal speeds system-level graphics rendering by up to 50%, as well as making it up to 40%more efficient on resources, compared with Yosemite, on equivalently speced Macs.

In a nut shell, Metal allows your Mac’s CPU and its graphics processor to work more effectively together, boosting high-performance apps. The most obvious benefit of Metal will be to games, but any high performance app – like Photoshop, iMovie, or any other graphic or video intensive app – will benefit from its up to 10x performance boost

Core Application Issues

When I say “core application” I really don’t mean apps that Apple has written, like any of the iWork components or Mail or iTunes. What I’m really talking about is Office 2016 for Mac. When El Capitan was released, it was released AFTER Office 2016 for Mac hit the streets. If you upgraded Yosemite to El Capitan with Office 2016 for Mac installed, you were – unfortunately and unknowingly – in for a very serious problem.

Office 2016 for Mac doesn’t run on El Capitan 10.11.0.

Since I started writing this review AND since the release of OS X 10.11.1, both Apple and Microsoft have released updates to the OS and to the suite to resolve the issues. However, it got dicey there for a while…

Features & Improvements

Security Updates

OS X 10.11 builds on the security model in Yosemite and takes it to the next level. Security is a big part of the El Capitan Update over OS X 10.10. Here, I’m going to touch on three of the biggest updates that Apple has made to its flagship OS’ security underpinnings.

System Integrity Protection (SIP)

Over the years, Macs have enjoyed a bit of anonymity. Hackers and malware writers didn’t target them because, quite honestly, they didn’t have the user base for most of these bad guys to bother with. That’s changing now.

In earlier versions of OS X, Apple introduced things like Sandboxing and Gate Keeper to help protect users from malignant code. Sandboxing requires programs to run in a defined memory segment, without the ability to write code to other parts of the computer. Gate Keeper effectively limits application installs from everywhere but trusted sources. In El Capitan, Apple is hardening its security model with System Integrity Protection (or SIP for short).

SIP prevents programs or users with insufficient security credentials to writing any files to /System, /bin, /usr (except /usr/local), and /sbin. This prevents malignant programs from In other words, it provides a type of root-level protection to the Mac similar to what the iPhone and iPad have benefited from for years.

Code injection and runtime attachments are no longer permitted, though expert users who really want to will still be able to access the system as deeply can still make system level changes that will allow them to do so. If you run apps like or TotalFinder, you’re going to find that they either do not work now, or you have to either fully or in part, disable SIP.

You can find instructions on disabling SIP here.

Some apps like Bartender, only need SIP disabled during install. After that, SIP can be reenabled.

System Integrity Protection helps keep your computer secure by preventing unwanted and malicious, privilege escalations.

App Transport Security

Web apps are gaining in popularity. Apps like Outlook.com and Gmail are hugely popular, and that TYPE of app are only going to become more prevalent. In order to insure that the data transmissions between your computer and the web server that the app is actually running on are secure, Apple added Application Transport Security to OS X. In El Capitan, that’s TLS 1.2, but as stronger transports become available, ATS will push everyone towards them as well. This type of security is insanely important in that without this secure layer, not only will productivity apps like Gmail and Outlook transmit data in the open for nearly everyone with a packet sniffer to see, but shopping apps that use the same secure transports will also pass insecure payment and credit card data back and forth.

Security protocols like this help make the future of online activity – whether that’s mail, or productivity (like Google Apps or Microsoft Office Online) or shopping apps safe to use

Privacy

El Capitan helps make computing more secure by protecting your privacy. Apple inverts the current cloud computing model by bringing the cloud down to your Mac, and not the more traditional model, which is the other way around. The easiest way to see a tangible example of this, is Spotlight.

When you search for data through Spotlight, you simply type a question and the search results are brought to your desktop. In a more traditional search model, you go to a web site – say Google or Bing – and search for something. You… go to the data, putting your security and your privacy at risk. In the Mac model, this is reversed. The data, comes to you, as it should be.

The best thing here is that when you use an Apple Online service, your personal data and the data you searched for and retrieved isn’t shared with any online service. You just get your results. This lowers the risk of your personal and/ or private data being inappropriately or inadvertently shared with other individuals or other companies. How well this works over time in terms of service quality and what you can and cannot search for based on what’s shared and retrieved, remains to be completely seen.

Feature Updates

El Capitan makes several updates to many of OS X’s key features. I’m going to highlight some of the more visible and more important feature updates in OS X 10.11.

Split View

Everyone is used to running multiple apps on their computer or laptop screens. I mean, we’ve been doing this really since 1990 blah-blah-blah and Windows 3.x. You get from one open app to the other by using ALT-Tab. Its very easy.

On the Mac side of the world, it’s the same way. We’ve been able to swap bits between apps since 1984 and Finder 1.0, if you really want to get down to brass tacks. You get from one app to another by using Command-Tab. Its also very easy here.

The big problem is that some times, all the other apps you might have open are nothing more than noise. Yes, you can try to Tile your open windows, but in many cases, if you don’t watch it, you can wind up with every open app window sitting next to every OTHER app window on your computer screen. When all you wanted was two apps side by side, this is hugely annoying.

Split View 01

In El Capitan, Apple takes a queue from Microsoft’s Snap feature and has given us Split View. With Split View, you can automatically fill your computer screen with two apps of choice. To get to Split View, you can either get there from Mission Control or from a full screen app. If you already have an app running full screen, you can drag another Split View compatible app to its desktop thumbnail at the top of the Mission Control Screen. Both apps will appear in Split View.

The other way is to click and hold the green full screen button with your mouse. The left half of the screen will become shaded in blue. Release your mouse button to open the current window on the left half of your screen. Any other compatible, non-minimized apps will show up on the other half of the screen as thumbnails. Simply click the other app you want to use in Split view.

Microsoft does this on the Windows side with Snap. You can get there in a similar fashion, and popping content back and forth between apps is just as easy via Windows Snap as it is with OS X Split View.

Mission Control

Mission Control 01

A streamlined Mission Control makes it easier to see and organize everything you have open on your Mac. With a single swipe, all the windows on your desktop arrange themselves in a single layer, with nothing stacked or hidden. Mission Control places your windows in the same relative location, so you can spot the one you’re looking for more quickly. And when you have lots of windows competing for real estate, it’s now even simpler to make more room for them. Just drag any window to the top of your screen, and drop it into a new desktop space. It’s never been this easy to spread out your work.

Mission Control 02

 

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