What kind of laptop is right for you?

In this guide, we’ll outline the different categories of laptops and which types are best for different users. We’ll also take a look at CPU, hard-drive, and networking options.

While there are many ways to divide the categories–based on weight, price, and components–the screen size is the primary deciding factor, as it’s the clearest physical difference between types of laptops.

UMPCs (or ultramobile PCs) are small handheld devices with screens that are between 5 and 7 inches, but they never really caught on. While the idea of a palm-size computer Dell d620 running Microsoft Windows and including most of the features you’d find on a full-size desktop or laptop was an engaging one, most of these devices were not exactly practical outside of a handful of specialized users.

Key features:
5- to 7-inch display
Nontraditional design

Netbook

Netbooks are either the most exciting thing to happen to mobile computing in years, (Acer aspire 4520 battery) or they are the downfall of an industry engaged in a painful price war race to the bottom. We generally define Netbooks as having 7- to 12-inch screens, a full keyboard, and an inexpensive, single-core low-voltage CPU.

While the earliest Netbooks had 7-inch screens and Intel Celeron processors, the typical Netbook today has a single-core Intel Atom CPU, 1GB of RAM, a 160GB hard drive, and runs either Windows XP or Windows 7.

Small and lightweight, they lack optical drives, have tiny keyboards and touch pads, and are generally underpowered for anything other than Web surfing, e-mailing, and basic office productivity. The payoff is that a typical Netbook can be had for less than $300, an unheard-of sum just a few years ago.

Key features:
9- to 12-inch display
No optical drive
Single-core low-voltage CPU, Intel Atom or comparable
Typically less than $500

Ultraportable

Before the rise of Netbooks, ultraportable systems were 11- and 12-inch laptops with then-expensive low-voltage CPUs, allowing them to be small and power efficient, but still relatively underpowered.

The popularity of Netbooks had threatened to make this category irrelevant–after all, who would pay $1,500 or more for an 11-inch laptop, when a $300 10-inch Netbook hp nx6100 battery (Hp dv9000) adapter was a reasonable substitute for basic Web and office tasks?

The ultraportable has been revived of late with the introduction of Intel’s new low-cost consumer ultralow-voltage CPUs. These chips are slightly more expensive and somewhat more powerful than the Netbook Intel Atom CPU, and are available in both single-core and dual-core versions.

Key features:
9- to 12-inch display
Low-voltage ULV CPU
No optical drive
Typically $600-$800

Thin-and-light

This somewhat unimaginative descriptor is intended for 13-inch laptops. Why do laptops with 13-inch displays deserve their own distinct category? It’s because they occupy a unique space in the industry. We define this by pointing out that a 13-inch laptop is the smallest size we’d be able to work on comfortably all day, and at the same time, the largest size we’d consider carrying around more than once or twice a week.

read the full article on: http://www.goodlaptopbattery.co.uk/battery-blog/

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