2013 Last Minute Holiday Buyer’s Guide – Part 2

Computers – or How to get Some Serious Work Done – Introduction

image3809I’ve been working with computers since 1981 when I began managing a computer retail store at the age of 16. Back then, in the days just prior to the retail introduction of the IBM PC and PC AT (the AT stood for Advanced Technology) most computers were very much reminiscent of the game consoles of today.  Computers like the TI99-4A and the Commodore 64 or the Apple II, were common place and were really more about playing games than getting serious work done.

Today, things are much different.  Computers can do real work and be taken most anywhere you need them to go. You can get them with a number of different operating systems on them, and in some cases a single computer can run more than one operating system…sometimes, even at once.  However, that may require some expertise and/or optional hardware and/or software in order to get it to run correctly.

There are a number of different choices in the desktop, notebook and ultrabook categories of hardware as well as in operating systems.  There’s a bit more to consider here than there was for tablets, so get ready to take in some information.  It may be a bit long, but in the end, I think you’ll find it worth the read.  Finding the right computer for your loved one(s) this Christmas is going to require you to consider the following:

What are you trying to do and how critical is the mission?

Assessing what you want to do and how important it is to you is totally subjective.  No one can really tell you that the tasks that you’ve set out for yourself are unimportant other than YOU. The answer to this question will help guide you to the right type of hardware.  The point is you want the right tool for the job.  For example, if your most important task is school work, you’re going to want something with a decent keyboard, and probably a dedicated – rather than integrated – pointing device. If the most important task is digital photo retouching, you’re going to want something that has a decent, monitor or screen. If you’re doing video work, you’re going to need a decent amount of processing power.

If you’re looking for a recreational PC, and your most important activity is social networking or email or web surfing, then the class of machine you’ll likely want or need is going to be completely different. You need to choose the hardware type and configuration that best suits your needs.

What software tools are available to satisfy that need; and at what cost(s)?

One of the best things about Soft32 is that it has a number of different resources for a number of different hardware platforms.  You can find software for Mac, Windows as well as mobile platforms. Having a place where you can find different kinds of applications at affordable prices is important.  Keep our link close at hand.

When you consider what you want to do with a computer, determining what tools might best perform those tasks is important. For example, while “Program X” may be available for both Mac and Windows, it may actually work better on one platform than on another.  Specific features may be better implemented on one side of the fence than on the other, or it may be easier to get the TYPE of applications you’re looking for on one platform rather than another.

Determining what you might want to complete your mission critical tasks with and what operating system they work best under will be a key factor in determining the kind of computer you buy. For example, Quicken from Intuit has always been much more advanced and much more complete on the Windows than on OS X. If financial management is your mission critical task and Quicken is your tool of choice, then a Windows machine may be a better choice than a Mac or Linux machine.  The differences between the way Microsoft Office functions on a Windows box vs. a Mac has closed a great deal with Office for Mac 2011.  Word for Mac 2011 is very similar in functionality to Word 2010/2013 for Windows.  The same can nearly be said for both Excel and PowerPoint. In this case, you could choose either a Mac or a Windows box.

However, if Exchange connectivity with a Microsoft tool (namely Outlook) or working with desktop database apps (namely Access) is an important part of your productivity regimen, then again, a Windows machine is likely your best bet.  At the end of the day, you need to assess what apps you will have access to, to satisfy your computing needs and then pick the hardware platform that has those tools.

This isn’t an easy task, and will likely take the most time in choosing either a first time PC or in reassessing what options you have when considering a computer upgrade.

What hardware configuration best meets that need; and where do you need to perform the work?

Different computing devices are better suited to the specific tasks for which they were specifically designed. In other words, you’re not going to want to do CAD/CAM work with a smartphone or netbook. You’re going to need to choose the type of device you need based on what you’re trying to do.

If you don’t need to cart your computer around, then picking a desktop is likely an easy/easier decision.  If portability is a need, then you need to determine HOW portable you need to be; or more easily put, how much junk are you going to be carrying around with you when you’re likely to need your computer? If you’re a mobile warrior – sales exec or IT consultant/contractor – frequently bouncing from place to place, then you may want something that is small and easy to carry along with the rest of your gear. If you’re a photographer or other video or freelancing professional, you may want or need  something with a large, or high resolution screen.

With the implementation of touch and the growing popularity of tablets, you now also need to consider how important a touch screen will be to you, as many notebooks and ultrabooks now come with touch screens and either a capacitive or resistive stylus. You need to determine if you’re more interested in a standard touch experience (best with a capacitive touch screen) vs. handwritten note experience (best with a resistive touch screen).

There are a lot of choices to be made here, the least of which include rotating hard drive or SSD, hard drive or SSD size, RAM amount, processor brand, type and model and graphics adapter and RAM amounts. Then you will want to determine if you’re going to want to upgrade any of these. Your PC choices may be limited by the amount of end user upgradeable equipment in your PC of choice. Generally speaking, desktops offer more expandability options than laptops or ultrabooks.  Many, if not most or all of these decisions, will also have a cost component as well.

Working though this task may also be difficult and will take up a bit of time when choosing either a first time PC or in reassessing what options you have when considering a computer upgrade.

What is your hardware budget; and how flexible is it?

Of all the decisions you have to make, this is probably the easiest decision out there.  Many of the Mac choices beyond the entry level build of each model can be very expensive.  Many Windows desktops and laptops are much more affordable than their Mac counterparts, even at the higher end models.  However – and this is a very important point – a Mac is a very versatile machine.  It can dual boot OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.x/8.x natively via Apple’s Boot Camp.  With some basic Linux hacking, you may even be able to get a native triple boot – Windows, OS X and Linux – going. However, it’s clear – Macs are expensive.

Windows machines are generally much more affordable. While that’s partially due to the diverse hardware manufacturers, it’s also due to availability of components. OEM’s have a choice in buying components and can buy in bulk.  With more than one OEM making Windows machines for the masses, it’s easy to find something that’s in your price range.

If the model you choose is end user upgradable, buying the entry level model for the processor type you want and then upgrading RAM, hard drive, and other components can save you a ton of money over time.

At the end of the day, what you decide to buy should be tied to what you want to do and where you need to do it.  Please notice that I didn’t ask you what operating system preference you might have.  In fact, that wasn’t even part of the equation.  The bottom line is that what you do and where you need to do it will drive how you work and the tools you use, including the operating system driving the PC. Period.

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2013 Last Minute Holiday Buyer’s Guide – Part 1

These are some of the hottest gifts available now, and some really good advice on which to get and why.

image2993Over the past few years, I’ve put together a Holiday Buyer’s Guide. I never got to do one last year due to commitments to the now defunct Byte. Thankfully, I’ve got a chance to do it this year; and while nearly everything you see here will have some kind of software available for it from Soft32, I’m going to cover the hot categories – tablets, smartphones, computers and accessories.

What you’re going to see are recommendations only. I don’t have everything that I’m going to list, so these aren’t necessarily reviews and shouldn’t be considered as such. However, I will try to cover recommendations from as many major camps within a given category as I can.   For example, I’ll likely recommend a computer from the Windows as well as the Mac camp, a tablet from the Windows, iOS and/or Android camp, etc.

This is going to take a few days to get through, so please come back often to Soft32 Blog for updates to the series. I’m going to do my best to get the series completed as quickly as possible.   Let’s get things started right now with tablets.

Tablets – Lean Back Devices with Lean Forward Capabilities
I’ve been spewing a lot of information and commentary lately about how Lean Back and Lean Forward devices don’t mix and match well in the same device.   I’ve talked to a great many people about this particular point and feel comfortable saying this about combining the two efforts into a single device:

1.    Do you have a desktop or laptop and are adding a tablet to the mix?
From my point of view, this is the most likely use case. Here, it’s likely that you’ve got set work habits that you’re looking to break away from your work machine. A lean back device or tablet is a GREAT way to do that.     You get all the multimedia and gaming goodness without having to mix apples and oranges between work and personal machines.
2.    Is your smartphone your main computing device?
If this is the case, then you’d probably benefit a great deal from moving up to a tablet as your main computing device. You’ll get much the same experience and be able to use the same apps or tools if you stick to the same ecosystem as your smartphone. The multimedia and gaming experience on a tablet will be much better and you’ll still be able to do everything you’ve been doing on your phone – email, social networking, IM and texting, and web surfing.
3.    Are you adding a tablet to your work or recreation gear?
I have found in most cases that when you do this, you’re adding hardware here to fulfill a specific need. In the office, you likely want something that can get you access to the office network so you can check email and access work specific resources during or between meetings.   In my case, I wanted to use a Windows tablet as a digital notepad so I wouldn’t have to lug different or more than one notebook between to and from meetings.   For down time, I wanted to use an iPad to watch movies, TV shows or other video on a commuter train. My needs and use cases were specific. I have found that most business and/or power users use tablets in a similar fashion.

In the end, how you use a tablet – either lean back or lean forward or a combination of both – is totally up to you and the way you work or want to work.   Just be aware of your needs and then make the choice and selection that best fits those needs.

There are so many different types of Android tablets from a number of different vendors, in a number of different form factors, configurations and price points. Regardless of your budget, you’ll likely be able to find something that will satisfy your computing style and needs in the Android camp.

While this is Android’s biggest advantage, it’s also its biggest problem. There’s TOO MUCH choice here, and it can be overwhelming.   My recommendation – if you don’t know what you want, go with a no-name brand and save some money.   This way, you get the tablet experience and get to try it out without investing more than $100 or so.   You can find a number of Android tablets at No More Rack or Rakuten (formerly Buy.com)   in the $100 price range.

If you already have a high end smartphone and there’s a tablet available by the same manufacturer, AND you can afford a matching high end tablet, I’d marry the two.   The important point here is that if you have an Android smartphone, to go with an Android tablet and vice-versa.   The big benefit here is insuring you can use the same software across both devices.

To that end,   if you’re going to go with a high-end tablet, my recommendation would be the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1.   The Galaxy Note line – over the Galaxy Tab line – specializes in hand written notes and OCR. While it works great with any Bluetooth keyboard (as does the Galaxy Tab line), the Galaxy Note 10.1 is specifically designed to take handwritten notes, which for a high school or college student is perfect.   You can still draw, sketch and create on the fly graphics, but you’ll also have the ability to take notes and then convert your handwriting to text later on.


Like any Android tablet, the Galaxy Note 10.1 will work very well with Google Apps, so you’ll have access to a full blown office suite of apps, provided you have the connectivity you need to get out to the internet. As I said, this tablet works well for students (both under grads and graduates) as well as business types (again, please keep your use habits in mind…) who might want to take this to meetings as a digital notepad.

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Browse the web in speed and style with Opera

opera_retina_iconChange is constant. If there’s one thing that you can count on staying the same, it’s the fact that things change. Case in point, Soft32 reviewed Opera Browser just over a year ago. At the time, I found Opera to be a decent browser, but not quite on par with, say, Chrome or Firefox. A year can make a huge difference, and quite honestly it did with the platform independent browser, Opera.

The internet is a huge resource, and if you go poking about, you never know what you’re gonna find. Opera makes that easier than ever with its Discover feature. Discover gives you top-quality news and entertainment from all around the globe. You can enjoy new content from a variety of categories and read articles from your region, in your language with just a few clicks. Its quick and easy to get the content you want.

Speaking of search, finding things with Opera is really easy. The browser has one intuitive, powerful location for searching and navigating the web. You can search using multiple providers and view the site suggestions as you type. This type of behavior should be very familiar to most web users and is a welcomed addition to Opera Browser.


If you’re on a slow network, or if you just want to make your browsing experience that much faster, again, Opera has you covered. Its Off-Road mode compresses pages for faster, all-conditions browsing. It helps you stay online when your connection slows down. If you’re concerned about dropping a connection, or things totally tanking, Off-Road will help your browsing experience.

One of the biggest problems I’ve got with all of my bookmarks and favorites is keeping them straight and of course, getting to the ones that I use the most. Opera’s enhanced Speed Dial, groups your most-visited sites directly on a custom start-up page. From there, you can quickly search and access your favorite content. Once you’ve found something you like, keeping it just got easier. Opera’s Stash feature can capture a page with one click and organizes captured pages into a simple, sophisticated list. You can quickly search what you’ve stashed in a resizable preview page; or search what you’ve saved, by keywords.

Opera has come a long way in just over a year. With improved search and navigation support and the ability to support off-line browsing; and the ability to make your browsing experience, faster, Opera has changed..and its changed for the better.

If you’re looking for an improved browser experience, then Opera may just be the breath of fresh air you’ve been looking for.

download Opera

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‘K… Unlock ‘Em if You Got ‘Em!

Major US carriers agree to unlocking principles.  Story at 11pm…

shutterstock_129802106I’ve been following this particular story for the past few weeks or so.  Quite honestly, this particular issue is near and dear to my heart as I cut my journalistic teeth on mobility – all forms of mobile computing to be precise – and its probably the one computing issue I really know the most about.  Today’s development is significant, as it brings the US closer to parity with other countries in the world when it comes to interoperability (but the true form of that is a whole other ball of wax for a later date…)

Anywho… the four major wireless carriers in the US – AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as fellow CTIA member US Cellular, have all agreed to the following:
1.    To post their device unlocking policies on their websites
2.    To notify customers once their devices are eligible for unlocking
3.    To unlock mobile devices for customers after their service contract has expired
4.    To unlock prepaid mobile devices no later than 1 year after their initial activation
5.    To respond to unlock requests within 2 business days
6.    Military customers who become deployed can have their devices immediately unlocked upon providing the appropriate deployment paperwork

According to former NFL wide receiver and current CTIA President and CEO, Steve Largent, “…this agreement will continue to foster the world-leading range of devices and offerings that Americans enjoy today.”

While I applaud not only the wireless carriers and the CTIA for coming together on this, let’s not forget that carriers in the European Union have had similar policies in place for a while now.  Technologically, the US is behind the curve. This is a catch up move.

However, it is a significant and important development; and its one that I’m very glad came about. While this doesn’t supersede the restrictions in the DMCA that prevents cell phone owners from unlocking phones on their own, it will give cell phone users a clear understanding of when and how they can get their phones unlocked and if they will have to purchase what is commonly called a “burner phone” if and when they travel internationally before they’re eligible to unlock their current phone with their home-based carrier.  (that still doesn’t sit well with me, but its much better than what we had before).

The six, adopted unlocking principles, in their entirety, are:

1. Disclosure. Each carrier will post on its website its clear, concise, and readily accessible policy on postpaid and prepaid mobile wireless device unlocking.

2. Postpaid Unlocking Policy. Carriers, upon request, will unlock mobile wireless devices or provide the necessary information to unlock their devices for their customers and former customers in good standing and individual owners of eligible devices after the fulfillment of the applicable postpaid service contract, device financing plan or payment of an applicable early termination fee.

3. Prepaid Unlocking Policy. Carriers, upon request, will unlock prepaid mobile wireless devices no later than one year after initial activation, consistent with reasonable time, payment or usage requirements.

4. Notice. Carriers that lock devices will clearly notify customers that their devices are eligible for unlocking at the time when their devices are eligible for unlocking or automatically unlock devices remotely when devices are eligible for unlocking, without additional fee. Carriers reserve the right to charge non-customers/non-former customers a reasonable fee for unlocking requests. Notice to prepaid customers may occur at point of sale, at the time of eligibility, or through a clear and concise statement of the policy on the carrier’s website.

5. Response Time. Within two business days after receiving a request, carriers will unlock eligible mobile wireless devices or initiate a request to the OEM to unlock the eligible device, or provide an explanation of why the device does not qualify for unlocking, or why the carrier reasonably needs additional time to process the request.

6. Deployed Personnel Unlocking Policy. Carriers will unlock mobile wireless devices for deployed military personnel who are customers in good standing upon provision of deployment papers

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On the Threshold of What..?

There are Windows Changes coming and some of them, my friends, are truly encouraging.

Change ahead isolated signWhen I write a column, I usually try to come up with some cool play on words or other “hook” to sorta grab a reader’s attention. With this particular column its really hard because the news I found is really very exciting; and there really isn’t a decent, cute way to put this without reducing the excitement.  So, I’m just gonna come out and say it:

It looks like the Start Menu – the real Windows 7 styled Start Menu – is intended to make a come back in Windows Threshold.  At least that’s what I see when I read the latest article by Paul Thurrott.

Paul and I go back a ways. We both worked for WUGNET for a while. Paul started WinInfo there, and I wrote most of their computing tips over a 15 year period.  So, honestly, when Paul says something, I tend to listen and listen VERY carefully. If there’s one thing I know, its that Paul knows Windows. So when I hear Paul say that the Start Menu is coming back, I tend to listen.

According to Paul and his cohort in Windows Weekly crime, Mary Jo Foley, Microsoft Threshold is all about bringing Windows to the threshold of unification between Phone, desktop and Xbox One.  This unification will include a series of updates that will go a LONG way to satisfying many of Microsoft’s very, very unhappy enterprise and consumer users.

In the next version of Windows, be it Threshold, Windows 8.2 or whatever they decide to call it, ModernUI apps will run in a window, if your PC supports Windows’ Desktop Mode. This is going work a lot like Stardock’s ModernMix, though its likely be somewhat different…at least one would hope.

The Start Menu is also going to return. The Start Button clearly wasn’t enough for everyone, and the “next logical step”  is to bring the Start Menu back as an available option.  According to Paul, its possible that this option will only going to appear in product versions that support Desktop mode.  There’s more that will likely be in this update, but at this time, this is all that’s confirmable.

Paul calls this a good step. I have to agree with him. Part of me is wondering if I’m not the only one wondering if this isn’t in response to Surface RT/Surface 2’s poor sales numbers and if Microsoft is clearly starting to get it – after more than 30 years, Windows is a productivity tool more than an entertainment tool.

If this is the case, I’d call that a good thing too.  I like Surface Pro and Surface 2 Pro.  They’re both good ultrabooks. However, with full blown Windows on them, its hard for me to use something like that as an entertainment device. Its not impossible, but YOU have to change gears with it. I don’t know about you, but I am not always very successful with that. I often find that I gravitate towards other devices other than my work PC for entertainment. Its easier for me to mentally keep them separate than to use one device for both purposes.

Over the years, I’ve found that my IT departments feel the same way. When you use a work PC for personal use, at least at my current job, you can be terminated.  The two do NOT mix at all, and BYOD is not something they encourage or support.  While other IT shops may not have the same policy, filling up a hard drive with MP3’s or videos is often discouraged.  Unless you work for a company that fully supports BYOD or are self employed and have to supply your own PC equipment, I’m not certain that kind of concern applies to you.  My guess is that most people don’t bump into the problem. Its likely not an issue for most.

What do you think about the Windows developments? Why not join us in the discussion below and tell us what you think.

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Consumer vs. Enterprise Windows

It’s a different kind of pane…

I’ve been involved in software for quite some time. Not to blow my horn or anything, but I’m a methodology and process engineering expert. I specialize in identifying process disconnects within the software development life cycle; and then help organizations identify the best ways to reconnect them.

I’ve seen a lot of talk over the past few days about Microsoft Threshold, or a unified approach to Windows that would bring everything together under one development cycle for Phone, Consumer and Enterprise Windows. Today, I got a refreshing look at the other side of the coin from one of my favorite People, Mary Jo Foley.


So…the first question on your mind has to be, “Well, that’s great, Chris.  How the heck are these two things connected?”  Good question…   Right now, except for Phone and RT – which is scheduled, to make an exit soon – all Windows development is connected.  Both consumer and enterprise versions of Windows have the same feature sets, underpinnings, back end hooks, etc.  With many hardware manufacturers concentrating more on the consumer market, keeping your enterprise product hooked to a consumer-focused, lean back device doesn’t make sense in a lean forward product line.

The needs of the [consumer]… are different than those of the enterprise. Consumers want to be current on everything, all the time, every day, out loud. The more current your security patches, virus updates and apps are, the more secure and virus free YOU are.  When it comes to keeping your personal, private data (like passwords and financials) personal and private, this is usually the best way to go.

IT professionals don’t always feel that way. While they have other security tools  available to them to insure that their networks are safe, they usually prefer static environments to rapid change.  With so much diversity in critical, operational apps from department to department, division to division, their focus is keeping the work progressing forward and not rapid OS changes. It’s easier to control the changes and insure that work gets done than to allow OS level changes into the enterprise that may conflict or create compatibility issues with business critical apps. They prefer policies and security restrictions so they may control when upgrades are applied.

From a use case perspective, this makes sense.  Consumers want all the latest and greatest features.  Professionals and people at work just want what they need to get the job done to work without having to wrestle with things.

This also makes a great deal of sense from a life cycle perspective.  Originally, both consumer and enterprise Windows were kept on the same development and feature life cycle so that people at work would be able to use the same version of Windows at home.  However, due to the implementation of Active Directory and Policy Manager, Windows at work and Windows at home have never quite felt EXACTLY the same.

Since PC use is declining in favor of a more slate-tablet form factor, and traditional computing is likely going to stick around at the office for quite some time (at least in the more conservative industries that I find myself working in – healthcare IT and State Government), splitting these user types into different Windows versions makes a lot of sense to me.  The only thing that I hope doesn’t happen is that they become so divergent that you can’t put the business form of Windows on your compatible, consumer tablet/device/PC.

According to Terry Myerson, the new head of the unified Windows team at Microsoft, the goal is to build one Windows platform that runs all compatible devices. However, that doesn’t mean “one OS to rule them all.” The UI’s may be different, the features may be different, but the underlying codebase – and more importantly, the cloud services – will be the same.

Strategically, this is very sound.  I’m going to have to reserve judgment until I see the tactical deliverable, however.  Post Windows 8.1, the picture gets fuzzy. However, between now and Spring of 2015, there should be two more Windows releases – in the Spring of 2014, there should be a Win8.1 Update 1 (or some such named animal) that will more appropriately align Windows and Windows Phone.  “Threshold,” or the next version of Windows, is the version slotted for Spring of 2015 and there’s very little that’s really known about it, its direction, etc.

At the end of the day, having this kind of desktop OS split from Microsoft isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it’s actually a return to a previous practice for them. Windows ME, back in 1990-blah, blah, blah was the last truly consumer version of Windows (Win95) before an updated version of Windows NT (Windows 2000, if you remember…) was released and became very popular with consumers, due in large part to is enterprise focused stability.

Do you think Microsoft returning/splitting its focus with Windows between consumers and the enterprise is a good or bad thing?  Can you support your argument?  I’d love to hear what you have to say.  Why not join me in the discussion below and tell me what you think of this interesting development.

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Keep your Windows PC safe with Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014

ashampoo_antivirus_2014_logoIf there’s one thing that I really like, its options. There are a lot of different kinds of malware out there, and finding and USING a malware scanner that works the best for you is important. This is one of the reasons why I like Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014. It’s a really cool virus scanner for Windows.

There’s a lot of malware out there. A lot of it effects Windows PC’s and that’s a problem, because a lot of people use Windows PC’s.  However, Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014 makes computing a lot easier. The nice thing about it is that once the app is installed, you don’t have to configure it.  It blocks malware right out of the box.  If that’s not, “set it and forget it,” then I don’t know what is.


If malware is found, it can be removed with little interaction from the user. In many cases, you won’t even know you got a bug. Malware is removed and removed fast.  Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014 doesn’t sacrifice speed over security.  Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014 is fast and light weight.

The bad thing about bad guys is that they are constantly trying to come up with new ways to get to your data, financials and other valuable information.  Thankfully, Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014 has daily AV signature updates.  That way, you stay ahead of the curve.

Unfortunately, getting malware on your PC appears to be a part of modern computing. However, with Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014, you can stay protected and malware free. With its daily signature updates and set it and forget it feature set, it protects your PC in the background with little or no intervention from you. Ashampoo makes some of the best software on the internet today, so trust Soft32 when we tell you this is one of the best apps in our catalog.

download Ashampoo Anti-Virus 2014

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Get your Gmail data in your Outlook installation with Outlook4Gmail

outlook4gmail-32When I went Android between 2007 and 2012, I fully switched over to a custom Gmail/Google Apps account and moved everything – email, calendar and contacts – over to Google services.  However, I’m a big Outlook user, and getting all of that information to and from Outlook isn’t always easy. That’s where Outlook4Gmail can be a big help. It’s an Outlook for Windows add-in, and its kinda cool.


Outlook4Gmail is an Outlook add-in that provides easy synchronization between Outlook and your Gmail contacts and calendar.  It supports synching contacts with all of the details – name, company, phone numbers, email addresses, etc.  With it and these features, you’ll be able to get all of your Gmail contacts synched between Outlook and your Gmail account.  The free version doesn’t support synchronization of more than one account, however. It does, however support one or two way, simultaneous synchronization for your address book.

You can also sync calendars with the add-in.  You can import a calendar from Google into Outlook, export an Outlook calendar to Google, sync existing calendars, or create new calendars. Unfortunately, you will need the paid version to take advantage of this.


As with any Outlook add-in, there’s no real app start or exit. The add-in loads when Outlook starts and will create its own menu item and ribbon with buttons.  If you bump into problems with either the account or other issues, the add-in will auto disable and you can get control of Outlook after you kill the task in Task Manager.

The biggest problem I had with the add-in was with calendar sync. The free version allows you to configure it, but doesn’t actually sync the content.  It’s a bit confusing, because the functionality just doesn’t activate.  The license is only $20 USD, but it’s hard to test something like this when it just doesn’t work in the trial version.

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