The next item up for review in our smartwatch round-up is the Fitbit Surge. Let’s take a look…



My quest to stop being a fat slob continues.

What to do, how much of it to do and what else I need to do to keep myself healthy is a never ending battle… and its not easy. There are way too many different daily challenges that present themselves.  Am I moving enough?  Am I eating right?  Am I sleeping right? These questions are difficult to answer as it is, and Fitbit has been trying to help people answer it for more than a few years now.

Their latest foray into fitness band/ smartwatch arena is the Fitbit Surge. It has a few nice things to offer not only the fitness conscious, but the smartwatch curious as well; and in this article, we’ll be taking a look at its suitability in both arenas.

This is the second review in a series – or round up – of smartwatch reviews that I’m doing.  The first on the Microsoft Band was large and in depth enough for me to break it up into two parts. You can see them here and here.  Its good and certainly worthy of more than a casual look.

My review of the Fitbit Surge is likely going to be just as lengthy and just as in depth. I’m going to pick apart the hardware. I’m going to pick apart the software. Smartwatches aren’t cheap. The Microsoft Band is $199… IF you can find one to buy.  I’ll cover the cost of the Fitbit a bit later, but I will say that it isn’t cheap, either.

Is the Fitbit Surge the right smartwatch and fitness band for you? Let’s stop dawdling and get down to it!


Like the Microsoft Band, the Fitbit Surge is a single piece of hardware.  It has a wide, silicone/ rubber band with a traditional, aluminum alloy buckle.  Its much easier to wear than the Microsoft Band, as there’s a great deal of give and flexibility in the Fitbit’s rubber band.  Aside from the same kind of issues that you might find in wearing any other sports watch, band or bracelet made of silicone or rubber – where you sweat a great deal and your skin may become irritated due to a lack of exposure to air – the Fitbit wears the way you would expect a sports watch to wear.  Honestly, I was very pleased with the way it felt while it was on. The only comfort issues I had were related to breathabiltity.

Wearability and Usability

I’ve been wearing the Fitbit Surge for quite some time now – well over six weeks.  The device is easy to wear and its very comfortable.  However, there are a few things about it that I am not too crazy about.  Part of that is esthetics, part of that is design and while the device is comfortable to wear, it does have Wearability issues.

 The first thing that I noticed about it is that its BIG, even the small sized Surge is big.  The device comes in 3 sizes, small, large and extra-large.  However, size doesn’t relate to device size, it relates to band length and the size wrists it fits. The device itself is 1.34″ wide (34mm) and the screen is 0.82″ x 0.96″ (21mm x 24mm).

 Here are the sizing requirements, direct from Fitbit:

    • Small fits wrists that are 5.5″ x 6.3″ (13.94cm x 16.00cm) in diameter.
    • Large fits wrists that are 6.3″ x 7.8″ (16.00cm x 19.81cm) in diameter.
  • X-Large fits wrists that are 7.8″ x 8.9″ (19.81cm x 220.61cm) in diameter.X-Large is available as an online only purchase.

There are a couple of gotchas here that you need to be aware of.  While they aren’t mission critical, they are important to be aware of so that you can deal with the issues they present.

  1. The wrist band is made of silicone or rubber
    Wearing a silicone band in and of itself isn’t bad, unless you’re allergic to the rubber.  Even if you aren’t allergic to it, you need to make certain you spend some time with the band off.  Silicone can often cause rashes and other skin irritation, and its important that you spend at least some inactive time during the day with the band off, especially if you start to notice any dry, red or flakey skin, or if you start to have some other sort of skin reaction to prolonged wear of the device.
  2. The device, though flexible is bulky
    While the band in and of itself is flexible, the actual Surge itself, is stiff and bulky. The Surge is much more comfortable to wear than the Microsoft Band but the actual electronics of the device go out a bit farther than you might think.  Its clear that Fitbit have created a device that’s very compact, but if you look at it from the side and feel around the ends of band near the actual device FOR the device, you’ll see that its actually a lot bigger than just the screen.

The device itself is, well… ugly.

I hate to say it, but it is.  It’s a lot bulkier than it first appears or seems and its one piece construction means that you don’t have any kind of style choices with it.  Other Fitbit devices like the Apple Watch and even the Fitbit Flex have interchangeable bands. The Surge is a single piece unit, and… right now… you can have ANY color you want… as long as its black.  It’s the only color currently available.  The Surge is supposed to be available in blue and tangerine, but as of this writing, both are currently – still – unavailable. I’ve had my Surge for about two months or so. It was announced at CES and black was the only color available then.  You would think by now – or at least, I did – that the other two colors – which, quite honestly, aren’t all that attractive either – would be available by now.

However, don’t expect to be able to change bands. Unlike the Apple Watch or even the Fitbit Flex, this is an all in one unit, and you’d better be happy with the color choice(s) you make. Once you buy the device, its yours to keep; and there’s no way to change colors or change bands. What you buy is all that you get.


If the Microsoft Band got notifications right, the Fitbit Surge doesn’t even come close.  On the Band, it was very easy to overdo notifications, as you could choose to have ALL of your notifications from your phone come over to Band, or you could choose specific ones that it does and keep the vibrations down to a dull roar.

With the Fitbit Surge, its exactly the opposite. You have just a single on-off setting for notifications on the device and then you get only notification of incoming text messages or incoming phone calls.

That’s it.

That can be good or bad, depending on what you’re looking for Surge to do.  If all you’re looking for is basic notifications from incoming messaging, you may be in luck.  As I said, the only notifications that the Fitbit Surge picks up are text messages and incoming phone calls.  If you’re looking to get notifications from upcoming appointments, Facebook Messenger or some other app on your phone, you’re out of luck.

The other big problem I have with notifications on the Fitbit Surge, is that the device doesn’t seem to understand or know when I don’t want them, or want them to stop.  I had notifications turned on for a while on the Fitbit, but have recently turned them off, as I didn’t need BOTH it AND the Microsoft Band buzzing my wrists every time my iPhone received a message, a phone call, or some other event occurred.

So, as I said, I turned notifications off on both bands.  Interestingly enough, Notifications on the Surge are still occasionally received, even though they are clearly turned off on the watch. I have no idea why. This is clearly a huge bug, as there shouldn’t be any notifications coming over at all.

However it clearly shows that the device’s software is capturing the notification and broadcasting the data. It clearly shows that the watch is receiving it through the Bluetooth partnership created on the device, even though its not supposed to be collecting ANY data at all. I’m seeing issues on both ends of the pairing; and its problematic at best. The fix for this – and it definitely needs to be addressed – will likely involve both a software update on your smartphone as well as a firmware update to the device.

UPDATE – The more that I wear the Fitbit Surge, the more I continue to have issues and problems with Notifications coming to it when they are clearly turned off on the device.  While the device does not alert that any text messages have come it, they are clearly coming across and they should not.


This is an issue that needs to be resolved immediately.

Battery Life

Battery life on the Fitbit Surge is actually pretty good. Compared to the Micrsoft Band, though, nearly ANYTHING would have better battery life… Well, not everything… the Apple Watch won’t last longer than 18 hours. The Micrsoft Band lasts 36 to 48 hours (even if you have Bluetooth turned off and sync via the USB cable).

The Fitbit Surge on the other hand, will last the better part of a week, even with all of the stuff that it does and all of the activities it tracks. Since the Surge tracks nearly everything you do, including sleep, the best thing to do when you do have to charge it is to charge it when you know you’re going to be inactive, or when you can’t wear it.  Swimming and showering come to mind as good candidate times when you might want to charge your Surge.  While the device is DEFINITELY water resistant, I wouldn’t hold it under water for long periods of time. Its not a perfect world, and my luck would have it getting water damage.

The biggest problem that I’ve found with the Surge is that it doesn’t give you a lot of warning when the battery is low, and you might find yourself out and about when you DO get a low battery warning. I’ve actually had mine die on me a time or two because I didn’t get an early enough warning that the battery was level was low.


The Fitbit Surge uses Bluetooth 4.0 to connect to your smartphone. I’ve found that while there are there are issues with this on other devices, the Surge specifically doesn’t use Bluetooth LE. I’m not certain if that’s why there are less connectivity issues with it as opposed to the Pebble Steel and Microsoft Band that I currently own.  Perhaps it is, and points to some larger issues with BT-LE devices.

What I can say about the Fitbit Surge is that while its connection to my iPhone 6 is much more stable, it isn’t as reactive or responsive as other devices are.  When implemented correctly, BT-LE devices tend to see their paired counterparts better and will actively connect when in range (though there’s even issues with this, as you can see in my article), as opposed to devices that do not pair with a BT-LE profile.

While I have less connectivity issues with my Surge, and while the battery life is decent even with its Bluetooth radio on all the time, I have found that data doesn’t come across the pairing unless the application is open and active. This means that I need to be actively using the app for the sync to work and pull data over.  Leaving it run in the background doesn’t do much… at least not consistently. I see this more as a Bluetooth issue rather than an issue with the Surge.

When you pair your Fitbit Surge with your smartphone, you’re going to see two connection partnerships – one for the Surge and one for Surge (Classic). The connection for the Surge is the one that you’d expect to see, and the one that is responsible for all of the connectivity and communication between the device and your smartphone.  If you want to use your Surge to control music playback, you need to enable Bluetooth Classic in the Settings app on the watch. After your Surge and your smartphone are paired, you can use it to control music playback.

To do so, open up a music app on your smartphone.  Then, double tap the home (left side) button on the Surge.  This will bring up the music control app on its display.  You will see your Surge attempting to connect via the (Classic) pairing, and then the current song’s meta data should appear on the watch face’s display.  You can pause the current song’s playback or skip to the next track. Unfortunately, not all music apps broadcast track information, which means that when using apps that don’t do that, the song title won’t appear on your Surge. However, you can still pause or skip to the next track.

I can see where this might be a great tool for someone who is exercising to NOT have to pull out their phone to control their playlist. Depending on where you have your phone stashed (not everyone fancies or trusts an armband case…), you may have to break your stride or stop exercising all together to retrieve and return your phone to its original place of storage.

However, I’ve tried this, and while its easier than pulling a phone from a shirt or pants pocket while running or walking, it isn’t totally a walk in the park, either. You’re going to need to get used to the interface and controls. You can pause, play, and skip songs. You’re going to have to pull your phone out if you’ want to repeat or replay any tracks or if you want to change playlists, midflight.

If you wear glasses for reading, you may have issues reading the audio file’s metadata, provided that your music app of choice transmits that information, on the Surge’s screen. While this isn’t a deal breaker, you do need to be aware of its limitations. Its hard to handle all of the varied functionality with only three buttons; AND to do it while you’re moving, too.

UPDATE – While writing this review of the Fitbit Surge, I’ve had it synching to my iPhone. Over the past few weeks, I’ve started to notice a few issues with Bluetooth connectivity between them both. They always seemed to work and play well together.

Right now, they are not; and NOTHING has changed on either end to warrant the issue in their pairing.  They just seem to not be looking at each other right now unless I absolutely tell them to get together. This is problematic at best, as when I started my Fitbit Surge journey, getting these two together was the easiest paring I’ve ever seen.  It just worked… straight out of the box.  Now, its like they love each other, but their not “in” love.


This is yet another reason why I think that while Bluetooth offers a LOT of potential, it has REAL issues as a data communications and transmission technology and conduit.

Software and Interfaces

I’ll get into Fitbit’s smartphone software in a minute, but I have to say something here, that’s bothered me since I started wearing the Surge – The information that it tracks and collects isn’t stored in Apple Health. Its stored in Fitbit’s proprietary program.  The app doesn’t share or swap data with Apple Health, and it really seems like it should. Some of what it does can’t be done in Apple Health, and that’s fine, but there really should be a way to have data from your iPhone and the data from you’re the Surge work and play well together, especially where Fitbit falls short.

Next Page

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The Reason Why I Drink, Or Why Documentation Is So Important

I’ve had a really bad couple of weeks…

So… gratuitous resume rewind – 25 years of QA experience… CHECK! On every, formal, Technical Windows Beta Team between Windows 95 and Windows XP and beta tested ALL versions of Windows between Windows 95 and Windows 10… CHECK! 20 years of experience as a technology journalist… CHECK!

Whoosh! Ok… I feel a LOT better. For a moment there, I thought I turned into an idiot.

Over the past three to four weeks, I’ve been having a great deal of trouble with my Surface Pro 3. I got the device in December and have had it warranty replaced once and swapped out to a NEW unit once. My original unit bricked when I tried to refresh it from Windows 10 Build 9926 to a clean install. I found out the hard way that installing Build 9879 blew the Windows 8.1 recovery partition and replaced it with a Windows 10 Build 9879 partition. Upgrading from Build 9879 to Build 9926 did NOT update the recovery partition, so the device choked upon refresh.

One appointment to the Microsoft Store’s Answer Desk had it restored to Windows 8.1; but then when it tried to setup Windows 8.1, the device froze during setup and was not recoverable. Hence warranty replacement number one.

A week so after that, I’m back at the SAME Microsoft Store, wanting to put Windows 10 back on my i3-based Surface Pro 3; and I’m having a problem creating a Windows 8.1 bootable, USB Recovery Drive. The process involves using the internal Recovery tool to create the drive. You’ll need the following:

1. An 8GB or larger USB Stick
2. A working Windows 8.1 PC with an whole and undamaged Recovery Partition on the internal SSD
3. About 30 minutes of free time

The full process can be found here. It’s easy to do, and anyone who can use Windows 8.1 (meaning EVERYONE) can complete the process. It’s really super easy…

However… please don’t think that you’re going to be able to actually USE that USB Recovery Image for anything, especially if you have a Surface Pro 3, and ESPECIALLY after the 2015-03-26 Firmware Update. The status quo has changed…but just slightly.

Before the firmware update, I could boot from just about any external, bootable image – from one on a USB stick to a bootable DVD on my USB-based BDVD-RW drive. It just didn’t matter. If it was a bootable image and Windows could read the image and the media, it all worked.

Then the firmware update hit, and it all went south.

I don’t have confirmation from anyone on this at Microsoft, but the latest firmware update modified the way Surface Pro 3 can boot. Now, you don’t need to hold Power+Volume Down to get the device to boot from USB. Now, you can set boot order preferences in UEFI, and the device will boot from the first device in that chain with a bootable image. So if you want to have your SURFACE PRO 3 boot from




Or any other potential, hard coded methods, the device will just do that. You don’t need to hold the buttons down any longer and hope that you’ve let them go at the right point, so you don’t have to repeat the process. It makes life, much easier.

However, Microsoft fails to note a couple of very important items in any of the documentation – if you can find it – related to the firmware update or the process for making a recovery image. The USB stick you use must have a GPT partition table.

Say what??

Yeah… a GUID Partition Table.

Mac users will recognize this. This is the partition table scheme that Macs have been using for years. PC’s have been using MBR or Master Boot Record partition tables since the dark days (…before the empire…) of DOS 1.0. However, that was when all PC’s were using BIOS and not UEFI. UEFI will use MBR formatted disks, but they’re much happier with GPT formatted disks.


And that’s NOWHERE to be found in the instructions here or here.

That second set is a better recovery image creating process than the first set of instructions. All you have to do is format a USB stick with FAT32, download a zip file, unzip it and copy the contents of the ZIP to the USB stick and you’re in business.

The problem is that the instructions fail to inform you that you have to format the stick with GPT. Which, BTW, Windows will NOT do by default… AND there’s no way that I know of to get any GUI element in ANY Windows to do that, either.

However, you CAN do it with a third party tool called Rufus.

The tool is small, simple and easy to use, and you can use it to do a couple of different things
1. Use it to format a USB stick with the proper partition type, file system and cluster size
2. Use it to create a bootable USB stick from just about any ISO you can get your hands on.

With Rufus, I was able to create a bootable, USB Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive with the downloadable recovery image you can get here. The most important thing you need to know about this process – which, by the way, isn’t documented anywhere – is that in order to create a bootable Recovery Drive for Windows 8.1 AFTER the firmware update from 2015-03-26, you again, must format the USB stick with the following parameters:

Partition scheme and target system type – GPT partition scheme for UEFI computer
File system – FAT32 (Default)
Cluster size – 4096 bytes (Default)

There are a couple of things you need to be aware of:

1. Anything that is on the USB stick will be destroyed when you click Rufus’ Start button. Back it up or copy it off before beginning the process.
2. Microsoft recommends you use a 16GB USB stick for this process, though I’ve been able to demonstrate that an 8GB stick will work.
3. Some partition types and file systems don’t work together. Rufus will tell you which ones don’t work and play well with others when you try to use them together.
4. If you want to create a bootable USB stick for, say, a Windows 10 install, you can specify an ISO image to use.
5. That ISO image will likely have file system requirements that you may have to adhere to. Again, Rufus will tell you when your choices and the file system on the ISO don’t match up.

This app saved my bacon AND my sanity.

I have been working a support thread with Barb Bowman most of the day today, and without her help and DIRECT intervention; I would not have been able to resolve this problem. I would have created yet ANOTHER Microsoft Answer Desk appointment and they likely would have swapped out my SURFACE PRO 3 i5 for another unit, suspecting it to be defective.

Now… the big problems I have will be moving this device over to Windows 10. There are a couple of new issues with that, given that I want to run the Enterprise version of Windows 10 and not the Professional (consumer-based) version.

1. The Enterprise download for Windows 10 is still Build 9926. Currently, Microsoft has us on Build 10049 in the Fast Ring.
2. I don’t want to have to install/ download a version of Windows 10 that’s three versions back.
3. The file system in the Windows 10 Build of 10041 (the last Build released to the Slow Ring and the last official, released ISO) is formatted with an NTFS file system, and Rufus won’t let me create a GPT based partition table with an NTFS formatted ISO. They don’t work and play well together.

This still leaves me with a problem of creating a bootable Windows 10 drive so that I can install Windows 10 Build 10041 on the new Surface Pro 3. From there, I can use Windows Update to upgrade to Build 10049, which includes the new Spartan Browser.

But that’s been my life over the past few weeks. I’ve been banging my head up against this SP3/ Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive issue so I can figure out a way of getting BACK to Windows 10 so I can continue my coverage of the OS on Soft32. As a result of this problem, I may have left my OneNote Disappearing Ink problem in the dust, but I’m without a way to actively test current builds of Windows 10 as I sold my Surface Pro 1 to Gazelle.

The biggest problem here is the total and COMPLETE LACK of documentation. I’m a software quality professional. I TRIED to find information on the issue. I had to start a support thread with Microsoft to get any resolution to this issue. If Microsoft had included this information as part of their instructions for creating a bootable recovery drive, AND if they had their Windows 8.x recovery tool automatically format the USB stick with a GPT partition table and as FAT32 as part of the process that creates the Recovery Drive, this wouldn’t be a problem at all.

Do you have a SP3? Have you had issues booting to a USB drive since the application of the 2015-03-26 Firmware Update? Did you know about Rufus; or about needing to format ANY bootable USB stick to use a GPT partition table? I’d love to hear about your recent experiences with this issue, if you’ve had them. Why don’t you join me in the Discussion Area below, and give me your thoughts?

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DJ Mixer Express for Mac

Mix your own music with professional results with this really cool Mac app.

downloadMusic is a huge part of my life. I’ve done studio work. I’ve recorded three albums of material, NONE of which are available anywhere…thank God; and I currently sing in Church as part of its Praise and Worship Team. When I do listen to music though, some of my creative juices start to flow; and you start to hear things in the music that may or may not be there, but could be if only… If only… and that’s why I like DJ Mixer Express for Mac. Its one of the best apps I know of to help you mix down tracks.

DJ Mixer Express is affordable and easy-to-use DJ software. It helps you create your own custom DJ-style music. The applications features include Dual player decks, automatic mixing, automatic BPM detection, automatic tempo control and one-click instant beat-matching synchronization. It has crossfading, seamless looping, automatic-gain, master-tempo, vinyl simulation, multiple effects and support mix your music from iTunes. Once you find your “inner voice,” you can easily express it by applying any one of a number of audio effects.

The app can record your mixes to WAV/AIFF formats and when you’re done, you can burn them to CDs. With DJ Mixer Express, you can mix your music files with professional precision. Most anyone can mix their music with the app’s simple interface in just minutes. DJ Mixer Express for Mac is simple enough for the beginners, but is professional-level software used by 1000’s of DJs in some of the most influential venues worldwide. Whether your songs come from iTunes or from your hard drive, all you need to do is drag and drop files onto the mixing deck or into the playlist; and you’re ready to go!


Whether you are an aspiring DJ or an already experienced DJ, you will find that DJ Mixer Express, lets you do mixes in a way you never experienced before. You can easily complete AutoMix. Its automatic beat & tempo detection allows you to easily match the playback speed of two songs for a perfect transition. automatic beat-matched crossfading, automatic pitch matching, seamless looping, automatic BPM counter, key lock (master-tempo), multiple effects and many other features are all possible with DJ Mixer Express.

The one thing that you really need to have access to, however, is the right kind of music for this kind of application. You also have to have an ear for how two disparant or similar songs can fit together. That more than anything else is perhaps the wild card here.

The software…yeah, its awesome and easy to use. However, you have to have the ear for the beats, you have to feel the rhythm. This is perhaps the most difficult part and one that may take you a few tries to get right. However, you WILL have an awesome time pairing songs in your library together, seeing if they fit, playing with the effects, etc.

download DJ Mixer Express for Mac

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Recent Microsoft Developments

There’s a lot going on in Redmond these days…

Microsoft Zentrale 16:9 hires Firmenschild Building 99

Over the past few weeks, I’ve had my head down at work; but I’ve also been hot and heavy with a review of the Fitbit Surge that’s still yet to be completed. When it comes to wearables, this new computing category really has many people curious and thinking about how and what it can and should be.

Over and above THAT, which has been more than enough in and of itself, I’ve been beginning some evaluations of Microsoft Office 2016 for Mac as well as dealing with some very serious issues with OneNote 2013 and Windows 10 … and yeah. I’ve been a little busy.

However, there have been a few new developments over at Microsoft, other than the ones I’ve mentioned, and I wanted to not only acknowledge them but comment on them just a bit as well. While this may not be ALL that’s hit the news wire lately, it is what has stuck in my head as I’ve got it buried under a bunch of stuff at the office as well as under a ton of research, screen shots and support thread posts.

Here they are in no particular order…

Internet Explorer is Dead
IExplorer_TransparentYes. The victor of the Browser Wars of the late 1990’s has followed Netscape and one or two other browsers in death. The Internet Explorer brand will die with IE 11, as Microsoft has finally decided that their latest browser, current code named, Project Spartan, will be released with a different branding and label.

While everyone is busy clamoring on the fact that IE is gone and that Project Spartan – whatever Microsoft ends up officially calling it – will be taking its place, what many are glossing over is that IE is still around, and likely will be for a while. IE is going to be relegated to the enterprise version of Windows, and will be used there for corporate and enterprise application compatibility purposes. With IE still in use at work, it’s likely that despite the fact that it won’t be officially updated any longer, it’s still likely to be patched for enterprise uses as part of Microsoft’s monthly, often security based, Patch Tuesday. So, it’s gone, but still likely to show up on many browser share analytic reports, as the peoples will surf while they’re at work. (yes… you can still haz internets.)

One of the things that I saw, but lost and had to recreate on my own, was a complete release history of IE from its initial 1.0 release in 1995 to its current, main release in 2013.

IE 1.0 – 1995-08-16 and released as part of Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95
IE 1.5 – 1996-01-15 (or there abouts) and included compatibility for WinNT 3.5.1
IE 2.0 – 1995-11-22 and included backwards compatibility support for Windows 3.1
IE 3.0 – 1996-08-13 and Included partial CSS support. Introduced ActiveX
IE 4.0 – 1997-09-15 (or there abouts) and was the first version to support Active Desktop and full OS integration
IE 5.0 – 1999-03-18 and was included with Windows 98SE and Office 2000
IE 5.5 – 2000-07-15 (or there abouts) bundled with Windows ME
IE 6.0 – 2001-08-27 released for Windows XP
IE 7.0 – 2006-10-18 first release to support tabbed browsing
IE 8.0 – 2009-03-19 Last version supported on Windows XP
IE 9.0 – 2011-04-12 Last version supported in Windows Vista
IE 10.0 – 2012-01-26 Only version supported in Windows 8.x
IE 11.0 – 2013-10-17 the LAST version

The tell-tale sign of its huge – and still very current problem – is the five (5) year span in the release cycle between IE 6 and IE 7. A great many corporate web portals and apps were developed for IE 6 during this time, and due to compatibility issues, many of them are still running on that platform today (five full versions later…)

Microsoft to Give Windows 10 to Pirates
This was an interesting development early this week, and is a great example of journalism that didn’t go quite far enough.


Early during the work week of 2015-03-16 to 2015-03-20, Terry Meyerson, EVP for Microsoft’s Operating Systems Group, was quoted saying a few very interesting things. One of them was severely misquoted and created not only a huge stir within the tech circles I follow, but a rather large piece of link bait as well.

First and foremost, Meyerson stated that Microsoft would ship Windows 10 sometime this Summer (meaning 2015-06-21 to 2015-09-23). Which is a huge statement to make, seeing as the software isn’t even feature complete yet in the builds delivered to Windows Insiders. Build 10041 is a perfect example of this. Microsoft still has a long way to go in not only delivering a new operating system that’s feature and function complete, but is stable and ready for both the enterprise and the consumer world. We’ll see how things go…

Secondly, Meyerson was quoted saying that Microsoft would give pirated copies of Windows an upgrade to Windows 10. The statement is accurate, albeit a bit misleading, hence the link bait… What the world heard was that Microsoft as going legitimize every copy of Windows out there, certified Microsoft Genuine, or not with a Windows 10 license.

That’s not the case.

Let me say again – That’s not the case.

While Microsoft WILL allow every single copy of Windows on the internet that it said had an upgrade path to Windows 10 – including Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 Update – to upgrade to Windows, it did NOT promise to legitimize non-Genuine copies of Windows. So, a pirated copy of Windows 7 WILL get upgraded to Windows 10 for free… but if it started out as a pirated copy, and was identified as non-Genuine, then it will remain that way until the owner of that pirated copy buys a legitimate license.


Microsoft Gives Passwords the Finger
I’ve heard a number of IT security professionals say that one of the biggest security problems in IT is – passwords. They’re lost, forgotten, stolen, easily hacked and in general… a giant pain the rear.

Microsoft has proposed a way of getting around the whole password issue with Windows Hello. According to Joe Belfiore,

“Windows Hello introduces system support for biometric authentication – using your face, iris, or fingerprint to unlock your devices – with technology that is much safer than traditional passwords. You– uniquely you– plus your device are the keys to your Windows experience, apps, data and even websites and services – not a random assortment of letters and numbers that are easily forgotten, hacked, or written down and pinned to a bulletin board. Modern sensors recognize your unique personal characteristics to sign-you-in on a supporting Windows 10 device.”

Windows Hello will satisfy stringent security requirements for government, defense, financial, healthcare, pharmaceutical and other security conscious organizations. The system WILL be able to distinguish between you and someone else and will only allow you to access YOUR authorized resources, though it will require specific hardware and software (like fingerprint readers, illuminated IR sensors and other biometric components) in order to work its magic.

In conjunction with a new and relaunched Microsoft Passport, you’ll be able to authenticate your identity and verify that you have the device in your possession. If the device also contains Windows Hello compatible hardware, then it can use your biometrics to log you in. Combining these two new pieces of technology, Microsoft will leave the password behind and will allow you to gain access to sensitive and confidential files and resources without any risk of them being inappropriately or illegally accessed. It finally gets around the weakest link in the computer security chain – the password.

While I’ve been writing this article, I’ve also been dealing with a huge Windows 10 and Microsoft Surface Pro issue. It’s the biggest reason why I haven’t posted anything in the past week or so. I am back… I think… and I hope to have something up on the experience in the next couple of days. Please stay tuned for the recounting of THAT train wreck, as its almost certainly going to point out that running a beta version of ANY operating system on your computers – whether they be daily drivers or other, less mission critical boxes – is a risk for any and everyone.

Let me just stress this here (and I will in the article I’m prepping, too) – You shouldn’t do it unless you are willing to accept the consequences and deal with the fall out. It isn’t always easy to recover from some of these situations. Sometimes, even the experts need help…

BUT, in the meantime, let me know what you think of these Microsoft developments. I’d love to hear from you and learn what you think of them.

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Microsoft Releases Windows 10 Build 10041

Insiders everywhere (on the Fast Ring) are currently breaking the internet…

Like ALL Windows 10 Insiders, I’ve been waiting since mid to late January 2015 on a new build of Windows 10. Back then, Microsoft released Build 9926 after an eight plus week wait after the release of build 9879 (which was a HUGE train wreck, by the way…). Build 9926 got the train back on the rails, but it wasn’t in as good of shape as previous builds, at least in terms of stability, but is been usable.

Aside from issues that I’ve had with OneNote 2013 and OneNote Preview for Windows 10, this hasn’t been too horrible for me. However, the issues I’ve outlined in the article linked above, are huge as they deal with digital inking and Office Preview for Windows 10 and Office 2013. Let’s face it… I have a Surface Pro 3 specifically because of OneNote 2013.


So, to be clear, the problems I’ve been bumping into with digital inking are huge.

While I do NOT expect my specific issues with digital inking to be addressed in Build 10041, I am hoping that some general improvement may help me out. It’s a slim chance, but I can still hope, right?

So, while I and the rest of the Windows Insider program members were waiting, I got a bit impatient and posted some very impish tweets to Gabe Aul, the Head of Microsoft’s Windows Insider Program.

Waiting on Win10 01

To further illustrate my points, I tweeted:

Waiting on Win10 02

Thankfully, Gabe seems to have a REALLY great sense of humor. I know he’s been getting a lot of chatter directed at him, personally. I also know that he’s been doing a STELLAR job. To really send that point home, today, Gabe tweeted the following.

Das Button

I was drinking some tea at the time I saw that and nearly spewed the contents in my mouth out at my monitor I laughed so hard. Yeah. Gabe is a good guy…

As noted in Gabe’s blog post, here are some of the release notes from the build:

Top issues fixed in this build (partial)

  • In 9926 there were several issues which prevented Start from launching, these should all be fixed.
  • Search box now works if you have taskbar on the top/side of your screen.
  • After installing the last build (9926), you saw a boot selection menu when you rebooted your PC. We’ve fixed this and you should no longer see the boot selection menu – unless you’re intentionally dual-booting.
  • We received feedback that people were seeing persistent grey thumbnails in the Collection view in the Photos app on Build 9926. We think we’ve worked through all these issues, so definitely let us know if you find a case where one still crops up.

Known issues for this build (partial)

  • Some people might hit an issue where the username and password boxes do not appear or don’t accept input when logging in, which will prevent them from logging in. Possible workarounds include clicking the “Switch User” button, using Ctrl+Alt+Del, or pressing the power button on your PC to sleep/resume and try again.
  • It is possible to manually lock your PC during the initial out-of-box experience. If you do this, you will have to hard reboot your PC and restart the OOBE experience. (So don’t lock your PC during OOBE :-))
  • There are several accessibility issues in this build, which may make it difficult to use with Narrator or 3rd party screen readers. Additionally there is an issue where using a Lens after enabling Magnifier may cause the screen to be unusable.
  • Some apps in the Store Beta will fail to install or update due to a licensing issue.
  • In this build, the Mail, Calendar, and People apps may be broken due to a licensing issue with the Store Beta. To get these apps working again, you need to follow these steps:
    • Open PowerShell as administrator
    • Run the command Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename –like “*windowscommunicationsapps*”} | remove-appxprovisionedpackage –online
    • Re-install Mail, People and Calendar from the Store (green tile)
  • You might notice a chess knight icon on your Lock screen to the right of the screen. This was added by the Lock screen team so they could tell via screenshots if someone was using the new Lock screen or the old one, and will eventually be removed in a future build.
  • Font sizes on the Lock screen on devices with high DPI can be really large.
  • We currently have the Tablet Mode notification turned off by default to address some of the issues we’ve been seeing. The notifications can be turned back on via Settings.
  • The touch keyboard doesn’t show up on login screen which prevents you from unlocking your PC when Narrator is on.
  • Some people might see frequent prompts to restart to install updates, even though no updates need a restart. This prompt can be ignored safely.

I am currently downloading Build 10041. It’s at 23% as of this writing (as you can see in the screen shot below). I’ll have more on this release after I’ve had a chance to work with it.

Build 10041 Download

Additional information on the release of Build 10041 and some of its newer features, as well as the above release notes, can be found, here.

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OneNote 2013 and Windows 10 – Potentially Lethal

The union is proving to be very problematic…

onenote and windows 10

I’m a huge OneNote advocate. In fact, it’s the major reason why I’ve been using a Microsoft Surface Pro series tablet since their initial release in 2012. The ultrabook’s active digitizer, pen and OneNote create a digital notepad experience that can’t be beat in a corporate meeting setting. I wouldn’t want to take notes in a meeting any other way.

When Windows 10 came out, it was natural for me to pursue placing it on my Surface Pro 3. I was a formal part of the Microsoft Technical Beta Team between 1996 and 2002. I’ve been an active Windows beta tester via my company’s IT department since time began, so I’m used to working on systems and with hardware with beta software on it. It’s become second nature to me.

OneNote on my Surface Pro 3 under Windows 8.x worked as intended and expected. It’s all released software with some maturity on it, so I expected everything to go smoothly; and it did.

With Windows 10, its been somewhat of a different story.  With Builds 9879 and older, things were fine.  While the OS may have been a bit buggy, OneNote appeared to be functioning as a mature, released productivity application running on a buggy, beta OS. In other words – situation normal.

With build 9926, however, things have taken a drastic step backwards.

The OS is still buggy and problematic, but that’s to be expected. It’s still a beta of an unreleased OS.  However, OneNote has become increasingly unreliable.  Unfortunately for me, this behavior has bled outside of the OS.  There seems to be something going on with OneNote 2013, specifically in Windows 10, as I’m not seeing this behavior anywhere else I have the software running.  And that… I find very concerning.

Pen and inking services are directly controlled by Windows.  This is where I’m having the issue and problems, and since OneNote 2013 is relying on Windows 10 to create digital ink, interaction between OneNote 2013 and Windows 10 Build 9926, seems to be at the heart of the matter.

OneNote 2013

OneNote 2013 exhibits a disappearing ink problem where drawn, digital ink just vanishes, never to be seen again, regardless of whether or not a notebook has synchronized or not.  It usually starts happening 3-5 minutes after the application has been opened.

Desktop OneNote doesn’t show any symptoms of the problem prior to ink disappearing.  Ink just…vanishes. It’s not ALL ink, or all ink after a specific amount of time has elapsed or a specific even occurs.  Some in may vanish.  Other ink may not vanish. Disappearing ink can be letters, words, sentences or whole passages of digital ink.

There’s no pattern to this. There’s no “tell.” There’s no way for me to state or predict with any level of accuracy what so ever, that after “this” point in the app, after being open for a specific period of time, or after writing a section of digital ink, that any, some or all of the ink will disappear; and it doesn’t disappear immediately after you stop writing.

It might take 15-45 seconds or so and then, when it does disappear, it doesn’t blip, blink or otherwise show you that it’s there, but invisible or merely “forgotten.” It’s truly no longer part of the file.

It may be removed as part of the “save,” as that part of the file was never part of the file to begin with. It may not.  I have no idea… and I think THAT more than anything annoys me the most.  I can’t catch the pattern, and either reproduce the issue on demand, or prevent it from happening.

OneNote Preview

OneNote Preview for Windows 10 also has a disappearing ink problem; but there’s a bit of a difference here.  OneNote Preview has a tell.  The current page you’re working with, freezes.  you can still ink on the page, but the page won’t move up, down left or right.  The app may then stutter, and/or closes and all of the ink that was written to a page from the point of the stutter forward – when the page freezes or refuses to move – disappears.

OneNote Preview also auto-minimizes at times. When its window is restored, the app displays its splash screen and then hangs or appears to hang. You can minimize/ restore the window all you want, but the app may or may not “reactivate” at that point. Your may have to force quit it and restart it. On many occasions, I’ve had to bounce my SP3 to get OneNote Preview for Windows 10 to run correctly again.


The app may recover and may or may not have had ink disappear.  I’ve noticed this behavior in OneNote Preview, and the app can “recover,” but the ink that was written while the app was in that “bad state” is lost. Ink written after that (i.e. when the screen “unfreezes,” is saved.  OR, the app may have a state so severe, that the Window won’t restore, and you have to quit the app via Task Manager or, if possible, tap and hold the icon on the Task bar and then choose “Close.”

I’ve been dealing with this now on and off for the past 3-4 weeks.  Its put a huge dent in  my productivity at the office, as I can and have lost whole paragraphs of written notes that I thought were “safe,” and ultimately were not.

While writing this, it was announced that Microsoft may be releasing a new Windows 10 build as early as 2015-03-13; and also announced plans to step up the frequency of its Windows 10 builds in its Insider’s “Fast” release ring.  If and how any resolution to this issue is introduced in any new builds of Windows 10 or Office 2013 will of course, be the subject of an update here on Soft32, and I will definitely keep everyone posted.  If you having issues with OneNote and Windows 10, I’d love to get the details from you in the comments section, below.

OneNote Tweet 01 OneNote Tweet 02

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The Biggest Problem(s) with the MacBook 2015

It’s not all sunshine and daisies with the new MacBook. There are a couple issues that may cause it some big problems…


I’ve been into mobile computing since 1992. I’ve had DOS/Windows based laptops in my backpack since DOS 3.x, and to be quite honest, I *DO* know what I’m talking about when it comes to portability and power while on the road.

And I do admit it… I’m a bit of a road warrior and a power user. I know that I really want more of the desktop replacement kind of notebook or mobile workstation. I want to do what I want to do – make use of my mobile darkroom, for example – while I’m out on a shoot, or be able to edit app screen shots or product photos I’ve snapped without having to compromise on capabilities or performance.  Yes… If you could put the horse power of a Mac Pro into a thin retina display laptop, I’d likely find some way to justify the purchase (much to my checking account’s dismay…)

So, when Apple announced the new MacBook 2015, and I saw it in that cool gold tone, aluminum alloy… I was like, “Oh yes, baby…!  Come to papa!”

However, after further consideration and a bit of research on what the newest member of the Mac notebook family is, can, and cannot do, I think I’m going to pass; and the reasoning behind it (aside from what you can see above), may not be widely known yet. So… here’s why…

Processing Power

The new MacBook 2015 comes with the new Intel Core M processor. Think “M” for mobility, here. The Core M processor is a power-sipping mobile processor that is meant for mobile applications like the new MacBook 2015. It can work with just 5W of power, and doesn’t need a cooling fan (further enhancing battery life) as well as contributing to the new MacBook’s svelte form factor.

However, because it doesn’t consume a lot of battery power, and because it doesn’t need a fan to cool it, it isn’t really a high-end work horse of a processor.  As such, don’t expect to run apps like Aperture, Final Cut Pro or PhotoShopCC on this thing and have it work the way any of your other, more well-endowed Mac do. It’s just not built that way.  Core i5 and Core i7 processors have a HECK of a lot more punch, though , they’re not as gracious with your battery life.

The MacBook 2015 is intended for web surfing, email, and moderate productivity apps (Word, Outlook for example should work well. Apps like Excel and PowerPoint may tax the device a bit, depending on the numbers you’re crunching or the presentation your pushing.). While the device has a premium price (it starts at $1299), it clearly does not have premium specs


Nope.  Don’t even go there…

The trend since the introduction of the Retina MacBook Pro back in Early 2012 has been static components, or providing a computing product without any end user serviceable parts. Popular items like RAM and hard drives/ SSD’s are now configurable at time of purchase and…that’s it.  You can’t change or swap them out at all; and if you do – as in the case, say of the 2012 to 2014 MacBook Air’s – you totally void your warranty.  The MacBook 2015 is configured THAT way – totally non-user serviceable.

It’s no surprise really.  If you remember the interior shots from the Keynote, the interior of the device is ALL battery.  If the SSD, RAM or logic board (which is smaller than a 3″x5″ card…) fail, the only thing that Apple is going to do for you, is to likely replace the entire logic board.

So the best thing that I can tell you here, is to buy as much as you can afford; knowing that the device isn’t meant for digital darkroom or macro or transaction intensive spreadsheets and the like. If you don’t the MacBook 2015 is likely going to be a huge disappointment for you.

Web Cam

At 480p, the web cam on the MacBook 2015 is pathetic. Its SD resolution is, at best, yet another compromise in what is clearly meant to be a premium product.  Any modern smartphone, including the iPhone 5 or later, has a better front-facing FaceTime camera than this one.  If my smartphone has a better web cam, and costs half as much as this notebook, why do have to settle for this woefully pathetic excuse for a FaceTime camera in what is clearly a modern, advanced, technology filled device?

This clearly makes little to no sense at all.  Apple needs to correct this in the next iteration of this device, without raising its price even a penny.

Connectivity and Expandability

Notice… I did not say “upgradability.” Expandability is not upgradability.  The device itself is NOT upgradable.

Wireless connectivity is handled via 802.11AC and Bluetooth 4.0 radios on the postage stamp sized logic board.  That’s not where I’m concerned. Those features come pretty much on any and every notebook on the market today.  What I’m really speaking to here… is the lone USB-C port on the device.  Aside from a headphone jack, it’s the only hardware port on the MacBook 2015.  Let me say that again…

The lone USB-C port is the only port on the machine.

This means that you’re going to need to carry

  • A power brick
  • Some kind of USB-C docking station or hub, or
  • Dongles for everything you want to connect to

Dongles…!  Dongles everywhere! Dongles in your bag. Dongles at your desk. Dongles hanging off your nice, elegant, expensive, ultra-thin notebook.

I’ve heard many say that Apple’s embrace of USB-C is the start of the world without wires.

I disagree. That started in 2008 with the release of the iPhone 3G, at least from Apple’s perspective.

The exclusion of every other port or connector on the MacBook 2015 EXCEPT USB-C is Apple’s way of telling you that you’re likely not going to use a wired LAN line, won’t cable your iPhone to your Mac, won’t use a USB keyboard (wireless, yes… USB, no), and are likely NOT going to hook the Mac to an external monitor.  Apple is pushing portability and lapability with the MacBook 2015.

HOWEVER… if you want to use a wired LAN line, you’re going to need a USB-C to gigabit Ethernet dongle.  If you want to do that while you’re charging your MacBook, you may have a problem, unless Apple puts a USB-C female port in their charger, or gives you a way to connect both to the one port at the same time via a hub or some sort of portable docking station.

If you want to put an SD card reader on the MacBook 2015, you’re going to need to use a USB-C dongle.   If you want to connect to an external display, or to an external hard drive, or to any other external device or resource, you’re going to need to use a USB-C dongle; and again, if you want to do that while you’re charging your MacBook, you may have a problem, unless Apple puts a USB-C port in their charger, or they or a third party give you a way to connect both to the one port at the same time via a hub or some sort of portable docking station.

Apple’s going to push the wireless connectivity, but you have to wonder how that’s going to work, especially with wired LAN, external hard drive (for Time Machine, at least…) and external monitor connections.  It may simply NOT be possible… I don’t know, and very few will, until 3rd party accessory providers introduce their dongles and connectivity solutions for the MacBook 2015.

I have serious questions about use cases for this particular MacBook. While I know this device really is more of a luxury or casual use device, you have to think that users at some point are going to want to use Time Machine to back up their device, or use an external monitor and keyboard. Without a Thunderbolt Port, how does (and do they really..?) Apple envision users connecting this device to an external display?  They may not see or want that happening at all; though I have to believe that Apple wouldn’t actively prevent users of this premium ultrabook from connecting to their premium external display.  That just doesn’t make sense…unless they plan to redesign it to also include a USB-C connector that also provides power.

And cost..!

Let’s not forget about cost..!  The amount of dongles you’re likely to need isn’t going to be an economic or frugal endeavor, either.  A USB-C to USB adapter costs about $20 bucks. However, a USB-C to digital AV, multi-port adapter is $80 bucks, and has an HDMI port, a USB 3.0 port and a USB-C port (for either additional expansion or most likely…power. And while USB-C supports USB 3.1 with a bandwidth of 10Gbps (on line with Thunderbolt 1) and should be able to handle multiple devices at once, including video up to 1080p, you’re going to have to daisy chain everything off the one dongle; and that’s going to get ugly (and you should get prepared for messages from your iPhone that the accessory you have it connected to may not be supported…).

This particular device screams, “give me a docking station or give me death.” Whether that docking station is simply a build out or expansion of Apple’s $80 multiport adapter or something else from a third party, like Henge Docks, remains to be seen.

Is the new MacBook for you? Is it something you want to add to your computing toolkit? Is it the beginning of the future of (Mac and Apple) computing? Why don’t you join me in the discussion area and give me your thoughts?

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Apple Event Recap

The day after the Apple Spring Forward event, what do we really know?


A lot happened at yesterday’s Apple event.  We got some updates on AppleTV, a new MacBook that’s thinner than a MacBook Air, and a ton of news about the Apple Watch.  Here’s a quick rundown of what’s known, now that the cat is out of the bag.


It’s gotten a $30USD price drop.  I’m buying at least two, I think now, for the house.  Now that they’re just $70 bucks, life can be totally cool on your TV for 30% less.  However, this is still the 3rd generation device.ookX new MacBook Air

The Apple Event didn’t mention anything about a 4th generation with any new functionality or hardware. While the device did have a price drop, exclusive HBO content, and a new software release that enabled 1080p playback, its highly anticipated next generation update is still MIA. The AppleTV has moved away from its hobby status and is now as much of a “real” product as any of Apple’s other mainstream accessories.  There’re also rumors of Apple trying to come up with a service to compete against Netflix and Hulu.  Now whether that pans out or truly ends up being a rumor remains to be seen.  In the meantime though… AppleTV’s for everyone!

To pair with your new AppleTV, Apple is partnering with HBO to bring us HBO Now.  This new streaming service will bring exclusive content to any Apple or iDevice for $15USD per month.  All you need is a broadband connection. Now, the cheaper AppleTV makes perfect sense. It also competitively prices it with other streaming boxes.


Everyone thought the 12″ Apple product was going to be an iPad.  Dubbed iPad Pro, the device was thought to be something that would compete directly with Surface Pro 3.  The end result wasn’t quite what everyone thought it would be.

Apple has revived its MacBook line with the MacBook 2015 – a Mac that is thinner and more powerful than the MacBook Air. The device is 13.1mm thin, weighs just 2 pounds and has a 12″ retina display.  Most interestingly, has better battery life than the MacBook Air.  In fact, the MacBook 2015 is nearly ALL battery.

During the reveal of the device, Apple displayed a logic board that is smaller than a 3″x5″ card.  It contains not only the CPU, but the RAM and SSD as well.  (None of these components are likely to be third party upgradable in even the REMOTEST fashion, so you REALLY need to make certain you get all that you need or think you will need when you buy the device You won’t be able to add to it later…) The only other electronics in the device (excluding the redesigned keyboard and retina display) is the new Force-Touch, touch pad.

The new Apple MacBook 2015 comes in Gold tone, Silver and Space Gray and available at $1299 and $1599 configurations (the latter having a faster processor, more RAM and a larger SSD).  Expect the MacBook 2015 to hit your Apple Online and brick and mortar Store sometime in April.



Apple’s entry into the quantitative-self market has spawned some new and creative thinking within their ranks.  How one can monitor one’s vitals, what can be monitored, and then – most importantly – how can the value of that data be maximized, is where Apple has obviously been spending a lot of time.

Apple revealed at its Spring Forward event that it’s been working with a number of different institutions on creating an opened-source framework specifically for medical research.  In conjunction with their institutional partners, Apple has release five different apps with ResearchKit, and more apps are on the way.

  • MyHeart Counts – Stanford University

This app is a personalized tool to help you measure daily activity, fitness and cardiovascular risk. It can help you understand your specific heart health or heart health risk by combining information from active participants around the world.

Specifically, it measures activity via your iPhone and Apple Watch – or any wearable device that’s linked to Apple Health.  The app can use existing medical data for blood pressure and cholesterol levels to help assess your cardiovascular health and risk for heart attack or stroke.

The app is available for free in the App Store, immediately.

  • Share the Journey – Sage Bionetworks

This app enables a medical research study trying to understand a patient’s symptoms after breast cancer treatment, why symptoms vary over time, and what can be done to improve and manage them.

Via questionnaires and phone sensor data, post treatment, persistent symptoms are tracked and reported back to the research team, including fatigue, mood and cognitive changes, sleep disturbances, and changes in exercise. You can track these and more. Both cancer patients and women without a diagnosis are encouraged to participate in the study to help see both sides of the breast cancer equation.

The app is available for free in the App Store, immediately.

  • Parkinson mPower – Sage Bionetworks

mPower is a personalized tool to help patients measure the effects and progress of the disease.

Managing daily changes in Parkinson’s is difficult, and those symptoms are often not tracked. mPower allows Parkinson’s sufferers to track tremor and vocal changes at their leisure.  Patients can also assess cognitive functionality and walking gait and report their statistics back to an anonymous, centralized server.

The app is available for free in the App Store, immediately.

  • Asthma Health – Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

The app reminds patients to take their meds, helps them track their condition 24×7, review condition trends and provides feedback on those trends.  The app specifically allows you to track – daytime and nighttime asthma symptoms and how they affect your daily routine, daily use of your rescue and controller inhalers, triggers, peak flow, ER visits, medical visits, changes to medication, etc.

The app is available for free in the App Store, immediately.

  • Glucosuccess – Massachusetts General Hospital

The app helps patients with Type 2 Diabetes track their health behaviors. You can track your physical activity, diet, and the taking of your medications.  The data that you collect will be shared through the app as part of the research project, but will be anonymous.

The app also provides insights into how your health behaviors relate to blood-glucose values.

The app is available for free in the App Store, immediately.

Research kit will be available in April of 2015, but the apps listed above are available now.

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