Corel Painter Essentials – Enhance Your Photos!

Screen-Shot-2011-07-08-at-9.13.09-PMEnhance Photos and create art with this professional graphics package.

I am a big photography nut. If there’s one thing that I like to do is take pictures. However, in many cases, after the picture is taken and the shot enhanced, or retouched, that’s often it. That is unless you have Corel Painter Essentials. It’s a really cool graphics app for Windows.

With Corel Painter Essentials – now called Painter X3 – you can do a great deal with your photos. You can create digital photo art. Painter X3 has power full cloning and painting features that allow you to transform your photos into something beyond a simple photo. With the right effects, the results can be stunning.

If photography isn’t your thing, don’t worry. Painter X3 has you covered there, too. You can of course create traditional art from a blank, digital canvas. The cool think here is that Painter X3 can actually mimic traditional media. With it oils look and behave like oils, water colors like water colors, pastels or chalk like pastels or chalk, etc. The effects are pretty cool to watch and work with; but you’ll need to see and experience that for yourself.

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If you’re new to art as well, don’t worry. PX3 has you covered as well. It has tools that are easy to use and understand. It even has a training app called Painter Lite that can teach you to master the basics. You’ll be creating cool pictures in no time.

Ok… I was suitably impressed. There’s a reason why this is one of my favorite apps and has been for many years.

There’s a lot more that you can do with Corel Painter Essentials than I’ve listed here. Its one of the most interesting graphics apps that I’ve ever seen; but I’ve known that for quite a while. In fact, its always been one of my favorites. The only bad thing about it is that is somewhat expensive. However, if you want to do more with your pictures than simple enhancements, this is the app for you.

download Corel Painter Essentials

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Lessons Learned from a Would-Be Cord Cutter – Part 2: It ain’t that easy…

Getting a free TV is easy. Making it work without subscription services isn’t.

cordcuttingA few weeks ago, I published an article on what I was doing to get broadcast video content without subscribing to any kind of cable or satellite service. I’ve heard from some people that it’s easy. I’ve heard from others that it can be challenging at best.

In short, I’ve learned a few interesting lessons and I thought I would pass them on. If you’re thinking about cutting the cord – cancelling your cable or satellite subscriptions, or simply going without them – there are some burps you’ll need to get around if you want to have the best experience. Here’s what I found out.

You’re GONNA Need an Antenna – The Leaf Ultimate (and Placement is Everything)

Large_antenna

Many local TV station affiliates – NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox, etc. – broadcast their content over the air. Besides the majors, there’s also a few other public access or personal interest stations that you might find available as well depending on your geographic location. In order to pull these stations in, you’re going to need a digital antenna.

Thankfully, you will NOT need one of those big, motorized metal monsters that you’ve seen strapped to the side of older homes or older homes with chimneys. However you will need an indoor antenna. The best one that I’ve seen – and the one that I ordered – was the Leaf Ultimate. It comes with an amplifier and is small enough that you can put it just about anywhere near the TV, though it is highly recommended that you locate it near a window.

The antenna is flat and looks like a laminated or plastic coated piece of paper. It connects to your TV’s coax connection and setup is easy. Provided you have the right kind of tuner (see below), all you’ll need to do is connect the antenna to the amplifier, connect the antenna to the TV and set the appropriate video mode for the coax input you attached it to. After searching for channels, you should be good to go.

Placement of the antenna is very important. Depending on what you’re trying to watch, you may need to move the antenna slightly now and again in order to pick up specific channels you want to watch or when the signal is pixilated due to inclement weather or weak signal reception. You can then put it back in the spot where you have it permanently mounted. The antenna is inconspicuous enough that it can either be mounted to a wall or bookcase with either included Velcro pads or pins. I’ve not experienced any reception issues with it, and it’s been functioning well. The Leaf Ultimate Indoor antenna lists for $89.99, but can be purchased for about $70.

Digital Signal Requires a Digital Receiver

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Back in 2009 when the US converted OTA TV broadcasts from analog to digital signals, there was a big push to get everyone a digital tuner. Most cable or satellite service users were not affected by this, as the cable or satellite box handled any required conversion. That made it easy for those folks to ignore the requirement and just watch TV.

Since being a cord cutter means staying away from either or both cable or satellite, using a TV manufactured prior to the digital tuner requirements put in place around 2007 and enacted in 2009, makes watching OTA TV impossible. In other words, you need a digital converter box.

I was able to obtain a decent Sony 720p/1080i TV for free. All I had to do was pick it up. The only issue I had in watching OTA digital broadcasts was that the TV was in 2002, and therefore had an analog tuner. I had to go to BestBuy and purchase a digital converter box. That cost me about $60 bucks.

The converter box is actually a digital tuner that bypassed my analog tuner and pushed the signal into the AUX port on the TV via coax, instead of the TV antenna port. The TV now displays all three local, major network affiliates plus other public broadcast and access channels. In all, I get about 20 channels.

I’m finding that I usually stick to the majors – NBC, ABC and CBS. The other channels, like ME-TV, The CW, etc., are nice, but I’m not finding a lot that interests me there. I like waking up to the news on weekdays. I now drive to work and finding out what weather, traffic and road conditions to expect always make the commute much easier to get through.

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One Windows OS (to Rule them All)

App windowsConfirmed – Windows RT to be cut from the Windows catalog.

I love my friends who cover Windows, namely Preston Gralla, Mary Jo Foley and Ed Bott.  They really know their stuff; and they have a number of contacts on the inside, where it counts, that provide them with some awesome insight. Today, I learned something “new.”

Windows RT is going to die.

Well, nearly EVERYONE knew that already; but today we were made aware of a couple interesting statements from Microsoft that all but confirmed it.

The Verge reported that Julie Larson-Green stated at the UBS Global Technology Conference that, “we have Windows Phone OS. We have Windows RT and full Windows.  We’re not going to have all three.”  Further, Terry Myerson, now heading up the Windows Group at Microsoft stated, “we should have one set of developer APIs on all of our devices…all of the apps we bring to end users should be available on all of our devices.”

Since Windows RT can’t run Windows desktop apps, and won’t, this indicates that the vision here is to have one Windows OS that will run on all devices, including phones, tablets and PC’s.  Since Dell has proven that a Windows Pro device can be just as miserly on battery life as a Windows RT device with its Venue 8 Pro, running Windows 8.1, it’s clear that MS is speaking directly about Windows RT.

Further, since Microsoft took a $900M charge against unsold Surface RT devices and forced Ballmer out, logic dictates that the shelf life of Windows RT and Surface 2 (not Surface Pro 2) are limited.  Consumers have repeatedly indicated that they don’t like the ARM based OS that doesn’t run standard Windows desktop apps.  This was just a matter of time on Microsoft’s part.

If I recall correctly, MJF indicated during a Windows Weekly podcast last month that this was going to happen, but the details have changed slightly. It’s easier to simply kill RT and then move Windows Phone and Windows to a single platform that it would have been to combine all three into a newer or single platform. The whole idea behind RT was to create a tablet platform, but Microsoft missed the boat when it created a separate platform instead of merging Windows Phone and RT together.

Since RT is going to die, and they’ll be merging Phone into Desktop Windows, it’s going to be a LOT easier for developers to create apps and games that can run on either platform. It’s going to make developing and selling apps a lot easier as well.

What do you think? Is this the right move for Microsoft? Why not join in the discussion below, and let us know what you think?

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Apple Still Wins Despite the Retrial

Samsung is decrying the verdict it lost to Apple in the recent Patent Retrial

Barring a huge smoking gun that never appeared, Samsung was all but assured a loss in the recent Apple v. Samsung patent retrial.  Well, that’s at least my opinion. Your mileage may vary.

In total, Samsung had been ordered to pay Apple $1.05B in damages.  However, Judge Lucy Koh reduced that amount by over $400M.  Samsung was still on the hook for approximately $600M.  A retrial was ordered on the damages, with Judge Koh asking Apple to reassess what they felt they were entitled to.  Apple asked for $380M.

They were recently awarded an addition $290M, or just over 76% of their requested amount.  That brings Samsung’s total liability – barring any appeals, which I’m certain you can count on – to $890M.

When asked for a comment on the recent verdict, Apple had the following to say,
“For Apple, this case has always been about more than patents and money,” Apple said in a statement following the verdict. “It has been about innovation and the hard work that goes into inventing products that people love. While it’s impossible to put a price tag on those values, we are grateful to the jury for showing Samsung that copying has a cost.”

Apple v Samsung Devices

Samsung has been trying to get the entire case thrown out of court and had filed two demands for mistrial.  One was for an alleged anti-Asian statement by Apple counsel, Bill Lee.  Mr. Lee is him self, an Asian-American.  So, uh… yeah, no.

Samsung also tried to have the case dismissed via mistrial due to a statement from the USPTO demanding that Apple defend its patent claims against invalidity.

Both requests were denied.

I’ve owned a number of Samsung devices.  There’s no doubt in my mind, based on the visual evidence alone, that Samsung copied Apple designs. It is, in my opinion, blatant.  I mean… just look at the device comparison graphic from the trial of Samsung devices before and after the introduction of the iPhone.  If that’s not blatant copying, I don’t know what is.

However, that’s my opinion. I’d love to hear what you have to say.  Why don’t you join me in the discussion below and give me your opinion.

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Upgrade Fever – Smartphones and Tablets and Laptops

Oh my..?   Yeah, I’ve noticed you only catch it if you want it…

Ever since the release of the first iPhone in 2007, there seems to be an annual hullaballoo that’s expected to take the world by storm. Every August or September, we’re expected to sit in front of our computers, drooling on our F5 keys as we wait for the guy at the other end of the keynote to update his live blog so we can see the latest version of Widgets on Parade.

Apple does it every year, and it’s become the gateway into the Holiday buying season.   Every major electronics manufacturer from Apple to Samsung has some sort of great product whose-whats-it that’s designed to create upgrade fever with that manufacturer’s fans. They also hope to win over nearly everyone else, too.

There’s one thing that I’ve noticed over the past few years, especially with Apple and the iPad.   It’s important to note too – especially right now – just 8 or so calendar days from Black  Friday  (or the day where most retailers sell enough stuff to take them and their balance sheets into the black for the year) because it may really dictate where you put your dollars:

You don’t have to catch upgrade fever.

I’ll say it again – You don’t have to upgrade your iPhone if you don’t want to. There are a few reasons why.   Most of them are common sense, but they may get lost in all of the excitement surrounding the new hardware release.   Let’s take a quick look, though.

The hardware is less than a year old

I think it’s actually amazing. I really do. Apple is a great example here, because they’ve been able to not only do this successfully, but do it consistently as well, to the point where their stock price will fluctuate if the iDevice announcement is delayed or doesn’t happen when the press expects it to.

But let’s take a quick look at not only the iPad Air, but the iPhone 5S/5C.   The iPad 4 and the iPhone 5 are just now out of factory warranty, if you got one on or near launch/release day 2012. I got my iPhone 5 on 2012-10-22. That means that as of this writing, my iPhone 5 is not quite 13 months old…and there’s not a bloody thing wrong with it.

Let’s leave aside the fact that I treat my gadgets very well and all of them are in pristine condition.   I’m likely the exception, there. However, unless you’re drop kicking your phone or tablet across the room at any and every opportunity, there’s very little chance that you’ve worn out the hardware. While this isn’t 1950 blah-blah-blah, things don’t wear out THAT quickly. Unless your very hard on your device, then it likely hasn’t gotten enough wear on it to justify the purchase of a new device to replace it based on use.

In fact, a whole new industry based on certified used devices or device resale has been created based on Apple’s annual product cycle.   Businesses like Gazelle, Amazon’s Used Device Purchase Service came about because of Apple’s rapid hardware update cycle.   Even Apple and the wireless carriers got into the game.   However, you need to understand that you’re going to take a bit of a hit on is resale value. The “depreciation” after only a year is a lot more with these companies than you might experience if you sold the device privately.

However, simply based on your device’s age and its condition, it’s still very usable. Getting rid of it just because the new version is now available isn’t always the smartest financial decision either.   Which brings me to my next point…

Only the guy on the uninsured motorcycle is actually made of money

Let’s face it – iDevices are expensive. The high-end cellular iPad costs nearly as much as an entry level MacBook Air.   An entry level iPad costs as much as a mid-range notebook or desktop. These things aren’t cheap.

I don’t know about you, but I can’t afford a new iPad every year. I’m not even certain I would want to buy a new one that often. Given the (potential) high cost of entry, keeping up with an annual, hardware refresh cycle isn’t realistic…unless of course you’re “financially independent.”   At the end of the day, I know I’m not that uninsured guy riding a motor cycle, littering the highway with $20’s.   Whether I wanted to or not, the point is moot. Buying a new iPad every year isn’t in the cards for me; or most people, for that matter.

Your Use Case probably hasn’t changed

When I bought my iPad, I bought it for a few specific reasons – I want to watch movies. I want to watch TV shows and I want to read eBooks.   These are “lean back” activities that I will likely do for quite some time with that device. In short, my needs haven’t changed and likely won’t for quite some time.

As the needs haven’t changed, I haven’t found the need or justification to upgrade my device.

Conclusion

I purchased an iPad 1 in December of 2010, and it’s been working very well since I put it into service. That device is perfect for what I want to do with it, and I likely won’t need to replace it unless and until it breaks or my use case changes.   The iPad 2 is still available for purchase at $399 USD.   It’s got almost twice the processing power as the original iPad, and is also thinner and lighter. If you have a similar use case in mind and want to buy “new,” an iPad 2 is likely your best iDevice of choice. If you’re going to do more with it – perhaps light computing or image editing – then an iPad Air or iPad 4 might be a better choice.

However, just because its older, doesn’t mean that it can’t do exactly what you need it to do.   This is true for nearly any and every electronic device available for purchase in any market today. Figure out what you want to do, and then find the best device to meet that need.   If your needs are like mine, then you may not have to have the newest device out there. In many cases, the original one you purchased can still meet the needs.

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Step on it, Already

Microsoft’s Board moves its CEO search towards the end

Bloomberg is reporting that Microsoft’s CEO search is nearing an end.   The company’s board of directors will narrow its previous list of candidates (set at 8) to 3 to 5, according to the news outlet. That meeting, scheduled for  2013-11-18  takes place one day before Microsoft hosts its annual shareholders meeting not far from its headquarters, in Redmond, WA.

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In a bid to keep or improve the momentum its stock saw since Steve Ballmer announced his departure within 12 months,   Microsoft will quickly advance its search forward.   Microsoft’s stock has jumped 17% since that announcement in August 2013. The company’s board would be negligent to allow it to fall off or stagnate.

There’s also been a great deal of criticism that many of the recent changes that Ballmer has enacted over the recent months, including the company’s focus change from boxed software to devices and services, its recent reorg – which was extensive – as well as its acquisition of Nokia’s handset business and the abandonment of its “stack ranking” employee evaluation system, would box the new CEO in and narrow their choices.   The fear is that this would effectively make them a replacement and not a successor.

The intent is to get a replacement in place by the end of the year.   If the selection process moves into 2014, then ValueAct’s president, G. Mason Morfit, a newly appointed board member, will have a more active voice in the choice of CEO as part of the recent agreement ValueAct and Microsoft entered into in August 2013. ValueAct Capital instituted a potential proxy fight and as part of the agreement to avoid that, Microsoft and ValueAct entered into an agreement that included a board seat for Morfit. The “more active voice” clause is also part of the deal, according to a filing with the SEC.

My friend Preston Gralla   had some  interesting ideas  on who that person might be. His take, and I agree with much of it, is that Microsoft needs a complete remake. That would kill nearly every internal candidate (Satya Nadella, Kevin Turner, and my speculation on a third internal candidate – Julie Larson-Green) as well as Stephen Elop.   Elop may be coming directly from Nokia, but he’s a former Softie, and was once part of the culture that needs to so drastically change. If I were a member of the MS Board, while Elop may institute change, I would be afraid that it wouldn’t be a big enough change.

That leaves just two real candidates – former Skype CEO Tony Bates and Ford’s Alan Mulally.   I honestly like both. While Bates may have the tech experience and the entrepreneurial drive that might be needed, I think Mulally is the better choice.   He has the corporate experience with a larger organization in Ford and has brought about the kind of rapid change that the MS Board wants. Mulally can always tap Tony Bates for COO, too; which would give the organization the best of both worlds.   It just may be the winning combination that Microsoft needs at this time.

I don’t want to push Kevin Turner out of a job, but in the end, it may be the right choice for Microsoft. If there isn’t another good spot for Turner within the organization, I’m certain he and his family won’t starve to death. Microsoft would likely take care of him if that scenario came about.

I’ll have more on the CEO developments at Microsoft as they become known. Please watch Soft32 for more on this developing issue.

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Chromebooks – What are they and Why do I Care?

What’s a Chromebook with enhanced offline capabilities..?

A notebook with a stripped-down desktop OS (or, “three Chromebooks walk into a bar…”)

 

Introduction

See… I blame the whole netbook era for this.

A few years ago, just before tablets hit the market and the iPad took the computing world by storm, netbooks were all the rage. They were really a full blown notebook computer with either a “starter” version of Windows or Linux or a hacked version of the full OS; but had budget processing power and RAM. In many ways, they were a hackers dream, as with the right tools, talent or instructions, getting unusual Linux or Unix builds or even OS X on one was fairly easy, requiring only the right OS build and a USB flash drive or CD drive. Back in the day, I had a number of articles published on Gear Diary on how to create a Hackintosh with an MSI Wind.

Netbooks were replaced by tablets; and then the whole rooting your Android device-thing started. In many ways, rooting your Android device has also seen its day come and go, as more people are interested in a pure Android experience. Jail breaking or rooting your device has become very passé and honestly, I’m glad to see it go, too. I used to be very much into putting custom ROM’s on my phone(s), and that goes all the way back to the PocketPC and Windows Mobile days. While it was fun (at times), it’s a great deal of work and the results you get aren’t always worth the effort, especially when you can now cycle devices in and out every 12 or so months.

What does this have to do with Chromebooks? That’s a great question… The way things have been going, I see the implementation of Chromebooks in a similar light – a relic of the pre-tablet age where an open-source undercurrent was trying to redirect the interests of the industry and mainstream computing. Cloud computing has its place, but I don’t see it as the savior that Google and others would want YOU to think it is.

Chromebooks are completely dependent upon a few key items in order to function correctly. Over the next few days, we’ll discuss them all and see if we can figure it all out.

Chromebooks

 

Google Services and Little Else

Let’s get this out there right now – unless you’re already in bed with Google, you’d better plan to be if you purchase a Chromebook. The device may not work properly with other cloud-based storage or office suite services, and then you’d be stuck. Buying a Chromebook means buying into Google. Period.

 

A Chromebook is (little more than) a Dumb Terminal

The current computing model is completely based on the Intel x86/x64 architecture and the client/server model of computing. Over the past 20 or so years, you’ve seen Moore’s Law prove itself and then be recast as the number of transistors that we can currently put on a silicon wafer sort of went from 2300 back in the day to more than 2.3M. The point I’m making is that the current computing paradigm has all of the processing power for your computer actually ON your computer.

It’s got a beefy processor with (increasingly sophisticated) power management capabilities. It has a boat load of RAM and as much spinning or flash storage as you can cram into it without blowing the price out of proportion. It (usually now-a-days) has an HD display as both HD capable desktop monitors and notebook screens are coming down in price.

Software ecosystems, even for traditional desktop/laptop computing, provide easy access to all of the tools you need to get your computing tasks done. Everything you need is on the computing device…except on a Chromebook.

Chromes doesn’t have a lot of local processing power built into it. It’s really a desktop version of the Chrome Browser for PC/Mac/Linux shoved inside a plastic and metal case. Most of the apps and computing that you do on it must be run within that browser wrapper. Things like Google Docs, Gmail, Google Photos, work well, and are really all you get. If it runs inside a browser window on your PC and if most of the heavy lifting the app needs are done by the web site/service, then you’re likely going to have a good chance of it running well on a Chromebook… especially if it’s a Google service. The local device can do some crunching and processing, but the device and service are designed to push most of the processing needs on the web server and service. “Regular” applications won’t run, however; so don’t look for that kind of experience from a Chromebook.

While this hardware and software configuration insures that the device itself can be relatively inexpensive (many Chromebooks are priced between $199 and $299), it doesn’t explain devices like the Chromebook Pixel, which sells for $1299. Most Chromebooks have budget processors – Intel Celerons, Samsung Exynos, etc. They’re not very powerful and really only provide basic computing services. The Pixel, however, is configured like a standard laptop, which doesn’t make much sense. It also has a touch screen, which either says they’re going to start doing some touch-centric related stuff with it and will also produce a tablet, or it could mean nothing at all. With Google… you never really know.

Chromebooks, though, are really designed to turn the lights on and just get you access to the internet. They don’t do any local bit crunching. What processing they do, is limited to local storage, file retrieval and internet service navigation and running of the “operating system.” As such, they’re really nothing more than a dumb terminal on wheels.

 

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Lessons Learned by a Would be Cord Cutter

Ya know… Getting rid of your cable or satellite subscriptions ain’t as easy as you might think. This is what I’ve learned so far…

 

Introduction

I recently got a new job in a different state. While we wait for the housing market to improve a bit before we sell the house, I’ve got long term, temporary housing set up. In an attempt to manage costs, I’ve decided to forgo with a local cable TV subscription and have decided to become a cord cutter. Internet TV or even getting TV on your computer isn’t as easy as you thought it might be; and I’ve learned some interesting lessons over the past few weeks. I’m going to do my best to cover as many of them as I can.

apple-itv

 

You Still Need a TV

I’ve got a 27″ Thunderbolt Display; and as a computer monitor it’s totally awesome. As a TV, however, it leaves something to be desired. It would be great if the right services were in place to be able to use it as a TV.

iTunes can be controlled with an Apple Remote on every Mac. I’ve also found that my Thunderbolt Display works well from across a small room; and an Apple Remote can perform basic VCR functions as well as control volume levels on my MacBook Pro. This however, is only part of the equation.

However, you can’t “change a channel,” and Apple TV functionality isn’t present on a Mac. Channel surfing really doesn’t exist in this situation. Things like Netflix or Hulu Plus are run in a browser and you need a full blown mouse or some kind of motion control device (like Microsoft Connect) to control your Mac from your couch.

If you have a TV and other accessories (see below) you can still cut the cable, but get the best of both worlds. If the Apple iTV was really a Thunderbolt Display with a built in Apple TV, or if there was a real world way to marry the two together, this would eliminate the need for a TV from the cord cutting equation. Unfortunately, I’m finding that a TV is still a required component.

 

Get a Set Top Box

As I mentioned above, if you REALLY want to have the best “cord free” experience, you’re not only going to need a TV, but you’re going to need a set top box. I’m really talking about an Apple TV, Roku Box, Chromecast dongle or other device that helps you find some traditional network (ABC, NBC, CBS, etc.) content, cable network (HBO, ShowTime, Cinemax, etc.) content, some specialty content (NFL Network, ESPN, etc.) as well as some streaming services like Netflix and/or Hulu Plus.

While streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Plus are available via a browser, as I pointed out above, getting a full blown TV experience is difficult without a set top box. It is possible to find traditional network, cable network or specialty content on the web with a web browser; but that often involves a separate fee. The set top box is often licensed by the content owner to play or stream the content without paying an additional licensing fee. It also makes using your streaming service subscription a lot easier, as it consolidates all of your options – including those available on your PC – into a single interface and place. Again, if I could use my Apple TV with my Thunderbolt display, this would solve a big problem for me.

 

Invest in a Really Good Digital Antenna

Services like Aero are really kinda cool. However, Aero isn’t available in all markets, and there really isn’t anything else like it that would allow streaming of local channels over the internet or other network connection. This is a huge problem if you’re a cord cutter and are trying to obtain digital TV services without any kind of cable or satellite TV package.

The obvious thing to do here is to purchase a really strong, really good digital antenna for your TV. While this will insure that you can get local TV programming, the most important thing you have to remember is that even though this is the Digital Age, you’re going to take yourself back to the Golden Age of Television when you do this. In other words, it’s going to be a challenge.

Local TV stations are required by Federal mandate to broadcast their programming over the air so that you can pick them up with a digital antenna. You don’t HAVE to have a cable or satellite TV subscription in order to get these channels, though in many ways, this is the easiest way to insure that

  1. You get the local programming
  2. You’re able to view it all clearly, without reception issues

I’ve used digital antennas before with other digital TV products and I’ve noticed that, like the SD TV’s from the ’50’s to the ’80’s (i.e.: before cable really took hold), a lot of antenna adjusting may be required based on your geographical and topographical location (where you are and the shape of the geography around you). The best thing you can do is to insure that the antenna you have is the best you can afford. The stronger that receiver is, the better the quality of the picture you will receive. (You’ll also cut down on the amount of tin foil and forks you’ll need to use to insure that the picture comes in clearly.)

 

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