Woz Says, “Just say No”

According to reports from Fortune, Woz hates the idea of an iPhone without a headphone jack…

headphone jack

Get ready… it’s coming, yet again. Can you hear it? It’s getting closer!

Change! Change is coming!!

I remember back before the Lighting connector was introduced with Apple’s iPhone 5. The entire world lost its mind every time Apple would make changes to its proprietary 30 pin connector; and it happened often enough between the release of the 3rd generation iPod in 2003 and the release of the Lightning connector nearly four (4) years ago in September of 2012 that the wounds are still fresh. Changes to the connector meant charging cables, cradles and other accessories wouldn’t work with the newer devices, requiring you to not only shoulder the expense for the new device, but for all new speaker, sync and charging accessories as well.

It made owning an iPod risky; and it made buying a new one all that more expensive.

Since the introduction of the Lightning port with the iPhone 5 in 2012, Apple’s connector hasn’t changed. Lightning cables are still Lightning cables, and they’re still somewhat expensive; but the cable still does everything that its 30-pin predecessor does and more.

This year, Apple isn’t targeting its sync connector for change. Its targeting something that’s a bit more fundamental – the 3.5mm headphone jack.

Over the past six to eight months, there have been consistent rumors regarding Apple removing the 3.5mm headphone jack from their flagship iPhone and in its place, putting an additional stereo speaker. Audio would be pumped through either the device’s stereo speakers, the audio channel in the Lighting port or through Bluetooth.

The proposed change has proven to be very controversial. The jack dates back to 1878 (yes..! as in the 19th century!). Back then the jack was 1/4 ” (6.35mm) long and used by telephone operators to connect calls from one circuit to another. Later, the jack was shrunk to 3.5mm. It’s gone through a few different revisions for both improved mono and later stereo sound. However, except for those small changes, the technology has gone largely unmodified during its 138 years (yeah… nearly 150 YEARS) of active, wide spread use.

The issue here is that EVERY set of (wired) headphones in use today from Apple’s Ear Pods and the junky jell-based earbuds you find at Wal-Mart to the top of the line Beats Headset and Bose over the ear headphones make use of the 3.5mm headphone jack; AND it’s considered by many to be the preferred method of connecting to a music player.

Case in point – according to an article published in Fortune, even Apple co-founder, Steve Wozniack prefers to use the headphone jack in his iPhone to listen to music over a Bluetooth connection.

The problem..? Bluetooth Audio sucks… and Woz is painfully familiar with it, as is just about everybody else that makes use of any kind of wireless audio connection. The dynamic range is suboptimal and the audio can often sound muddy. According to the Fortune article,

Still, that’s not enough for Woz. In his interview, the Apple co-founder said that transmitting audio over Bluetooth isn’t good enough for those, like him, who want better fidelity.

“I would not use Bluetooth … I don’t like wireless,” he said. “I have cars where you can plug in the music, or go through Bluetooth, and Bluetooth just sounds so flat for the same music.”

Pulling out the headphone jack in the iPhone 7 will likely affect every iPhone user. Many audiophiles don’t use wireless headsets yet because fidelity just isn’t there yet. The mid-range is too strong, the bass can often become muddy when its adjusted “too” high, and the high end is often flat, though experiences often greatly differ from headset to headset, external speaker, to external speaker.

Sound quality from Bluetooth-based accessories greatly improved over the last few years. There has also been a great influx of wireless audio accessories on store shelves. Apple doesn’t sell an Apple-branded set of wireless headphones. Instead, the company offers Bluetooth-based headphones through its Beats brand, which it acquired in 2014 for $3 billion USD. In fact, Beats sells several wireless earbuds and headphones that work well with an iPhone without a headphone jack.

While many who exercise (run, walk or some other solitary workout) often do so to music, they often find that the wired cord of their headsets often get in the way. Exercising and fitness have become one of the hottest catered activities and Apple is aligning both the iPhone and the Apple Watch to address this popular trend. That’s why they appear to be interested in removing the headphone jack.

The iPhone 7 is currently anticipated to be announced early next month, sometime during the first full week of September 2016. Unfortunately, Apple is one of the most secretive companies in the world, and it is unclear if the next iPhone will arrive during an anticipated, late September delivery date with or without the 138 year old headphone jack.

Will you be in the market for a new iPhone this year? Does the prospect of Apple removing the 3.5mm headphone jack appeal to you or do you feel this is a mistake? Does Bluetooth audio work well for you? Do you own a set of wireless headphones that you’re happy with, or do you use them in wired mode, instead?

I’d love to hear from you on this. Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area, below and tell me what you think?

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WWDC 2016 Part 1 – macOS Sierra

A lot came out of the WWDC Keynote…

Apple WWDC16

There was a great deal of information that came out of Apple’s software only keynote address to press and WWDC 2016 developer attendees.  In this article, I’m going to concentrate on macOS Sierra.

macOS Sierra concentrates on a few different things. The ones that really caught my eye include Continuity, iCloud and Mac Fundamentals.

Continuity blends the lines between your devices. Your entire computing experience with you logging into and unlocking your computer. macOS Sierra now allows you to auto unlock your Mac by simply opening up your Mac while wearing your Apple Watch.  Apple Watch users can simply open the lid of their Mac laptop while wearing their Watch, and the Mac auto unlocks. Proximity and time of flight networking technology insures that it really is YOU opening up your Mac laptop.

Apple is also implementing a universal clipboard that works between your Mac, and all of your iDevices.  When you find something on your phone that you might want to use on your Mac, you don’t have to email or text it to yourself.  Now, the data is in your clipboard, and all you have to do is paste it.  One of the things missing here – at least as of this writing because I haven’t had time to play with Sierra yet – is clipboard history: the ability to remember a set, number of items copied to your clipboard.  Sierra may support this, it may not.

iCloud Drive makes documents available across all of your connected Apple devices whether they be Macs or iDevices, it doesn’t matter.  With Sierra and iOS 10, you get not only all of your documents, but your desktop and its contents available too.

iCloud Drive also now includes a feature called Optimized Storage.  Modern computers – laptops especially – come with SSD’s.  Unfortunately, most of those SSD’s are smaller than the spinning disk hard drives that everyone is used to.  Macs come with 128GB, 256GB or 512GB SSD’s; and even with half a terabyte, your drive can fill up quickly. iCloud Drive will now intelligently make room for new files on your Mac by moving older files from your Mac to the cloud, allowing you to access them there, instead.  iCloud Drive now only REALLY keeps the data that you’re working on, locally on your Mac.

Apple Pay now works on the web through Continuity.  When you’re buying something online on your Mac, you can use your iPhone to pay for it through Apple Pay via Continuity.  All you need is your iPhone handy, and you should be good to go.

For Mac Fundamentals, Apple has taken a logical, straight forward approach.  For example, tabbed windows now appear on every app, Apple created and included with Sierra or third party app.  This change comes at the OS level and no additional third party developer support is needed.

Picture in Picture (PiP) support is now also included at the OS level.  That means you can be writing a really great Mac article (like this one…) while also watching a video in a POP window that will travel with you from Space to Space and will work with full screen apps as well.

Siri is also included as part of Mac Fundamentals. Siri has her usual sass, but includes the ability to ask the system complex queries that you can pin to Notification Center. From there you can even drag and drop them into a document.  The seamless integration of it with other new and existing Apple features make the complete package very compelling, if not ungodly expensive…  However, if you ARE all Apple all the time, AND you have a compatible Mac, then you’re really going to love what you can do with all of your Apple gear.

You can see demos on all of this (as well as the rest of the Apple WWDC Keynote) here.

Speaking of compatible Mac hardware, Apple has also released the Mac hardware compatibility list for macOS Sierra.  Those computers include the following:

2009 and later

  • MacBook
  • iMac

2010 and later

  • MacBook Air
  • MacBook Pro
  • Mac mini
  • Mac Pro

While this list seems pretty decent, there are some pretty obvious computers missing from this list.  In the pre-2010 list, it seems that only MacBooks and iMacs get Sierra love.  Missing from that list are ANY kind of MacBook Pros, MacBook Airs, Mac minis and Mac Pros.

For me, this means that my wife will be eligible for the upgrade, but my son-in-law with his Late 2008 Aluminum Unibody MacBook, will be left out in the cold. All of the other Macs in the house – my daughter’s Late 2015 13″ MacBook Pro, my Late 2013 15″ MacBook Pro and Mid 2012 13″ MacBook Air – will all get updates.

As of this writing, I’m installing macOS Sierra Developer Beta 1 on the MBA.  I’ll do my best to put it through its paces and then have some kind of write up in the coming weeks.

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Do I have the AceDeceiver Malware?

Most – if not all – iPhone users, can relax…

AceDeceiver-Malware

There’s but a great deal of hub-bub over the latest revelation that non-jailbroken iPhones can be breached with a man in the middle attack (MitM) that comes to iDevices via flaws in Apples DRM system, FairPlay.

Apple’s FairPlay DRM (digital rights management) system insures that only authorized users can get access to purchased content (apps, music, movies, etc.) through a given AppleID. However, this MitM attack allows hackers to install malware on iOS devices without a user’s knowledge or consent, bypassing Apple security measures.

According to PaloAlto Networks,“In the FairPlay MITM attack, attackers purchase an app from App Store then intercept and save the authorization code. They then developed PC software that simulates the iTunes client behaviors, and tricks iOS devices to believe the app was purchased by the victim.”

While this has previously been used just to pirate iDevice apps in the past, this is the first time this particular attack has been used to install and spread malware.  Victims first download a Windows program called Aisi Helper which is supposed to provide jailbreaking, system back up and device management and cleaning services.  Once installed, it installs malicious apps to any and all iDevices that are ever connected to the PC.

From that point forward, the malicious app redirects App Store requests to a malicious store, where your AppleID and password WILL be phished.  So, what does this mean for YOU, the iPhone user right now?

Honestly, not much; and there are two really big reasons why:

  1. Currently, this effects users in China
    … and that’s about it right now. So unless, you’re an iPhone user, in China, at least for the moment, you’re safe.
  2. This is currently a Windows only Attack
    So, if you’re a Mac, you’ve got nothing to worry about. It all starts on the desktop, as I noted above.  If you’re using a Windows PC, then be vigilant; but again, unless you’re a Windows user that actually uses a Chinese localized version of Windows (and actually resides IN China), then you don’t’ have anything to worry about.
  3. If you’re OTA Only
    …Then don’t sweat it at all. If you NEVER connect your iPhone to a Windows machine, like…EVER… then you’re perfectly safe.  Apple’s on device security measures have already covered for this, and you have nothing to worry about.

So, what can you do to protect yourself, if you’ve been to China recently, use a Windows PC, and think maybe you might-could, possibly be infected??  That’s really easy.

  1. Don’t Jailbreak your iPhone
    I know, I know, I know… I said earlier that this attack hit NON-jailbroken iDevices. The whole thing starts, though on the desktop through the program Aisi Helper. While you may not be interested in its jailbreaking services, it can be used to backup, and clean cruft from your iDevice.Here’s a piece of advice – the only thing you need to use to back up your iDevice is iTunes. Period. If you don’t connect to iTunes on your computer through a USB cable and are OTA only, then use iCloud to back up your device. If you think you need to reset your, iDevice, then use only Apple provided tools (iTunes or the Reset functionality in your iDevice’s Settings).  Using third party tools for any of this is just an invitation to trouble
  2. Uninstall the Desktop Software
    If you have Aisi Helper on your PC, uninstall it. Period.  Don’t ever install any third party tool to backup, clean, or manage content on your iDevice, unless you REALLY trust the developer. And then, it’s really, REALLY risky.
  3. Run a Virus Scan
    After its gone, run a full virus scan with the tool of your choice, and then  make sure you quarantine and then remove any threats that are found.

This development is interesting, and monitoring for it on your iDevice and outside of China (where it’s the only place this is currently a threat) isn’t a bad idea.  However, at this point, for everyone else, this isn’t too big of a deal.  The biggest thing you have to keep in mind though, is that jailbreaking your iDevice is risky, no matter how much you might hate Apple’s walled garden.

While you may not be able to do everything you might want to do with your iDevice in terms of customization and side loading applications, with the threat of malware that steals your personal information that can lead to identity theft, the cool factor and the value in breaking free largely lose their appeal.

What do you think? Is jailbreaking still a thing?  Does it really offer you the options you’re looking for?  Is it too risky?  Do you have a jailbroken iDevice?  Why don’t you meet me in the discussion area below, and let me know?

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The Difference between iCloud and iCloud Drive

Boy is THIS one a big muddled mess…

icloud vs icloud drive

About a month or so ago, I had a VERY good friend of mine have an issue with his iDevice.  He thought he had copied something to iCloud, but when he went looking for it after he reset his iDevice, it wasn’t there.  The hullaballoo that ensued was one for the record books as he scrambled around trying to find what he lost.

What he was looking for and if he was successful in restoring it to a place he wanted the file to reside in – while interesting – isn’t relevant.  The problem is that Apple’s cloud storage offering, iCloud, is pretty much a train wreck; and everyone that *I* know of, is pretty much totally confused and out to lunch when it comes to figuring out exactly what gets stored where, and more importantly why that object is stored THERE rather than someplace else.

I’m going to do my best to break this down and explain this as quickly and succinctly as I can. Bear with me, some of this is going to make sense. Some of it won’t. The BEST thing you can do, if you’re a Mac and/ or if you use any kind of iDevice, is simply accept that it is what it is; and then try to follow the rules.

If it doesn’t make sense to you, all I can say is, “Ask Jobs…”

What is iCloud?

This question should be labeled as one of the Seven Wonders of the [Modern] World.  Honestly, I don’t think that Apple really knows EXACTLY what they want iCloud to be; but this is the closest analogy that I can come up with –

iCloud is a giant, nebulous, all-purpose, storage locker.

Similar to the underside of a teenager’s bed, it’s the place where Apple wants to shove junk you want to save and/ or reuse from either your Mac, your PC, your iDevice, or all of the above.  Unfortunately, it’s just as organized, too.  Let’s face it, it’s a mess in there.

There are two basic components of iCloud (there are likely more, but for our purposes, and for the sake of argument, let’s just stick with two, ok?) – iCloud Backup and iCloud Drive.

ICloud Backup is the place where you can stash junk.  The data you “place” here is data like your text messages, email, contacts, calendar, photos, notes, and reminders.  Backups of your iDevices (iPhone, iPad, etc.) are also tossed in here.  Apple’s productivity suite, iWork, also places Pages, Numbers and Keynote files into iCloud Backup (and not into iCloud Drive, which I’ll get to in a bit…)

There are a few issues with all of this, and its mostly related to iWork.  However, the big thing you need to remember here is that the data here… is COMPLETELY unstructured.  You have no control over it, how or where its stored in iCloud, or even what is used to retrieve it; and this is the key to iCloud Backup.

Apple doesn’t want you to think about where you stash your stuff or what you used to create or modify it with.  The app that you use, handles all of that.

In other words, when you take a picture with your iPhone (if you have the device set to do this…), it automatically gets copied over to iCloud. After that, it’s available on every device that’s associated with your Apple ID, Mac, PC or iDevice, included.  The data just sorta shows up.

If you have to reset or rebuild any of those devices, the data is just supposed to show back up after you log back into it with your Apple ID.  There’s no “restore” command to invoke.  It just shows up in its own time. This is both good and bad.  Your data is constantly “backed up” and you don’t have to do anything to get it back.

The problem is, most people don’t think that way (when it comes to restoring data that may be lost).  There’s also NO way of going into iCloud Backup and cherry picking just the stuff you want to pull down or restore. It’s an all or nothing deal.

When it comes to your iDevices, things start to get a little muddy.  IDevice backups used to include the firmware, data and all the content (music, videos, photos, apps, etc.) on the device. The backup was a total and complete image of the device.  Now, it’s really just the configuration – a list of what apps you have installed, a list of what music, videos and other consumer content are on the device, etc.  When you restore a backup to your iDevice, the content you want comes back, but it’s all downloaded through iTunes,  or synched back to the device from iTunes via USB cable.

The issue here is, in my opinion, how everything in iCloud Backup is structured.  It’s totally UNstructured. Everything is either managed by the iCloud enabled/ aware app that created the content; or more like, it’s just shoved there, and if you want it back, the app that controls that data likely has settings that handle it all.

Apple doesn’t want you to HAVE  to think about all this. They just want to handle it for you, and unfortunately, NO ONE but the folks in Cupertino think that way. It goes against everything that the public’s been taught since 1980-blah-blah-blah.

Apple’s been fighting this paradigm for over 30 years when they first introduced the original Mac 128’s back in 1984. The whole, “you just WORK and let us think about HOW you work,” thing has never worked for the majority of the general public who, at best, work on Windows machines at work and have Macs at home. It just rubs us the wrong way… but I digress.

What is iCloud Drive?

iCloud Drive is probably the easier of the two to understand. ICloud Drive is Apple’s version of Drobox.  It’s also likely the most (in my opinion) organized part of iCloud. Period.  As such, again, it’s likely the easiest to understand; but it’s not without its foibles.

ICloud Drive is cloud-based document storage and retrieval. Like Dropbox or any other cloud-based file system, you can control what is there, what folders it’s in, etc. Whatever you place there, will copy down to any and all Macs (or iDevices running the iCloud Drive app) and PC’s running the service.

You can picture it as the box of specific junk that’s shoved under that teenager’s bed.  Everything else is a jumbled mess, but the stuff in that box is neat and organized.  Like Drobox or Google Drive you can copy items in or out of the service, and the changes will sync up or down to all connected end points.

The Lynchpin in iCloud and iCloud Drive

The one gotcha here is the way storage is managed.  It’s a one size fits all kinda thing; and its totally finite.

When you buy iCloud storage, you buy an amount that is shared between ALL iCloud services, including iCloud Drive.  So, if you buy 50GB of iCloud storage for $0.99 a month, you have 50GB available for everything you want to store, including, device backups, iCloud Drive, Photos, etc.

With the way Apple has this setup, it’s very easy for one particular service – say iDevice backups – to swallow up all your storage, leaving you with nothing for everything else.  You have to watch and manage what is being stored in iCloud; and you can do that via the iCloud control panel in Windows or via iCloud settings on your Mac or on your iDevice.

Thankfully, iCloud storage pricing tiers are now a bit more in line with everyone else’s.  All prices are monthly charges and in US dollars.  You can get

  • 1TB – $9.99
  • 200GB – $2.99
  • 50GB – $0.99
  • 5GB – Free

So, iCloud and its storage amount is very much like the space under that teenager’s bed. There’s only so much space and unless you get more (or in this analogy, a bigger bed…) once the floor space under the bed is gone, so is your ability to store anything new there.

Both OneDrive and iCloud offer 5GB for free. Dropbox only offers 2GB. Google Drive offers 15GB for free.

I hope that this helps make this clearer for everyone.  If there are additional questions on how this all works, let me know via the Discussion area, below. You can also shoot me a tweet at @chrisspera.

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Apple Releases iOS 9.2.1

Apple released the latest version of iOS 9 into the wild the other day…

Apple-iOS-9
As of this writing, the fifth version  of iOS 9, iOS 9.2.1 has been released into the wild.  Previously, Apple released 9.0.1, 9.0.2, iOS 9.1 and iOS 9.2 after the initial release of iOS 9.0 in the third quarter of last year (2015). iOS 9.2.1 has been  in testing since mid-December 2015 and has seen three beta releases.

As updates and releases go, iOS 9.2.1 isn’t a big one. It’s got bug fixes and security updates in it, including an MDM fix for enterprise customers.  iOS 9.2.1 will be followed in short order by iOS 9.3, which is currently sitting in beta testing with members of Apple’s Developer community.  It should be released in about 6-8 weeks, so some time this coming Spring. Its considered to be a much bigger update, with iOS’s new Night Shift feature as a major deliverable.  Night Shift is intended to change the overall color of the light used by your iOS screens (changing it from blue to yellow).  Cutting down on blue light exposure in the evening hours will help promote better sleep and sleep habits for individuals who use their iDevices moments before trying to close their eyes and go to sleep. IOS 9.3 will also introduce new educational features, too.

If you have an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus, iOS 9.3 will also include new Quick Actions and it will introduce updates for apps and features like Apple News, Apple Notes, Apple Health, Siri, CarPlay as well as other updates and features.

IOS 9.2.1 is available now and should be a 170-300MB OTA (over the air) update.

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Release-a-palooza – Apple Releases Multiple OS Updates

Today Apple released updates to watchOS, iOS and OS X.

update banner

I knew things were close to being done for all three of these releases, but I wasn’t certain when Apple would greenlight changes to watchOS 2.0.1, iOS 9.1 and OS X 10.11.1.  Today, Apple released all three of these updates to a much awaiting public.  The big news (as far as the OS carrousel, though) is the fact nearly no one saw the release of watchOS 2.0.1 coming. Apple didn’t announce or release it to its Developer Community at all.

I’m going to run down all of the changes for each and then I’ll have a bit to say on the changes overall, before I wrap it all up.

watchOS 2.0.1

watchOS 2.0.1 is now available to download via the official Apple Watch app on iPhone. It weighs in between  62.8 to 68.4 megabytes.
watchOS 2.0.1Apple’s new watchOS update features support for the latest emoji characters also found in iOS 9.1 and OS X 10.11.1. They include unicorn, taco, burrito, and middle finger emoji’s.
Changes from Apple in watchOS 2.0.1 include:

  • A fix for an issue that could cause software updates to stall
  • A fix for issues that were impacting battery life and performance
  • A fix that resolves an issue that prevented a managed iPhone from synching iOS Calendar events to Apple Watch
  • A fix that Addresses an issue that could prevent location information from properly updating
  • A fix for an issue that could cause Digital Touch to send from an email address instead of from a phone number
  • A fix that addresses an issue that could cause instability when using a Live Photo as a watch face
  • A fix that resolves an issue that allows a sensor to stay on indefinitely, when using Siri to measure your heart rate

Additional information and details can be found here.

IOS 9.1

iOS 9.1 is now available for download for iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch either over the air (OTA) or through iTunes on a Mac or PC. According to Apple, the update includes new features, improvements and bug fixes.

Changes from Apple in iOS 9.1 include:

  • A fix to Live Photos so they now intelligently sense when you raise or lower your iPhone, so that Live Photos will automatically not record those movements
  • Over 150 new emoji characters will full support for Unicode 7.0 and 8.0 emoji’s
  • Support for the 4th generation Apple TV
  • Support for the iPad Pro
  • An update to the iOS virtual keyboard that improved the shift key icon, making it easier to see when the shift key has been pressed, or double tapped (for CAPS Lock).
  • New device wallpapers of Mars, Jupiter and Neptune

Emoji’s seem to be the order of the day. All three of the updates noted in this article have huge emoji updates in them.  Like watchOS 2.0.1, iOS 9.1 includes new emoji’s for a taco, burrito, hot dog, cheese, popping champagne bottle, ice hockey, ping pong, archery, and even a middle finger.

The big thing to note in iOS 9.1 is that this is the version that is required for the iPad Pro.  The biggest change here for it, has to do with multi-tasking and the Apple Pencil; but that’s old news, and I’m not going to go into the virtues or lack thereof, of the iPad Pro.

Release notes for iOS 9.1 can be found here.

OS X 10.11.1

OS X 10.11.1 is now available as a free download on the Mac App Store. In the release notes, Apple states that the update improves the stability, compatibility, and security of a user’s Mac.

Specific changes made in OS X 10.11.1, according to Apple, include:

  • Improves installer reliability when upgrading to OS X El Capitan
  • Improves compatibility with Microsoft Office 2016
  • Fixes an issue where outgoing server information may be missing from Mail
  • Resolves an issue that prevented display of messages and mailboxes in Mail
  • Resolves an issue that prevents certain Audio Unit plug-ins from functioning properly
  • Improves Voice Over reliability
  • Adds over 150 new emoji characters with full Unicode 7.0 and 8.0 support

The big item of note here is Office 2016 compatibility. I’ve held off updating any of the Macs in the house until Microsoft and Apple got their respective acts together as it relates to Office 2016.  I use Office 2016 for all of my writing and other productivity tasks, and so do my daughter and her husband. They need it for all of their school work.  Without this, any move to El Capitan would have been very premature on our parts.  Now that this is resolved, we should be good to go.

UPDATE:  As I was writing this, I updated my MacBook Pro to El Capitan, and the Office 2016 apps that I use (Word, Excel and PowerPoint… Outlook is still – and will continue to be – a train wreck until they get a better handle on some of its data store issues.  It’s also NOT a feature parity with Outlook for Windows and I can’t help but wonder WHY at this point…but that’s another story entirely and I don’t really need to get started on that here…)

Release notes for OS X 10.11.1 can be found here.

There’s a lot here. If you’re an Apple user on any level, today was a day of updates for you.  I’ve updated nearly all of my gear, including my Apple Watch (that’s a link to Part 4 of my four part review.  It’s got links to the other three parts, in case you haven’t seen it).

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Apple Releases iOS 9.0.2

Apple continues to swat at bugs with its latest iOS release

ios9

Wednesday 2015-09-30 saw the release of iOS 9.0.2, Apple’s latest update to its mobile operating system.  Released a week after iOS 9.0.1, this latest update comes just two weeks after the initial release of iOS 9.

IOS 9.0.2 is another minor update – a bug fix, really – and also addresses other performance enhancements.  The following were called out in the release notes for this update:

  • Fixes a screen lock vulnerability that allowed Siri to be used to bypass the lock screen to access photos and contacts on a locked device
  • Fixes an issue with the setting to turn on or off app cellular data usage
  • Resolves an issue that prevented iMessage activation for some users
  • Resolves an issue where an iCloud backup could be interrupted after starting a manual backup
  • Fixes an issue where the screen could incorrectly rotate when receiving notifications
  • Improves the stability of Podcasts

IOS 9 focuses on productivity and performance, with some major updates to both Siri and Spotlight.  Notable among its new productivity enhancing features is a split-screen multi-tasking view that allows more modern devices, like the iPad Pro, to share and pass information back and forth between apps (like Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other productivity apps)  iOS 9.1, also due later this year, and anticipated during the month of November with the general availability release of the iPad Pro, is meant to focus on productivity for the new enterprise capable tablet and the AppleTV.

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The iPad Finally Goes to Work

It finally seems like the iPad can pay the rent…

I’ve been trying to bring my iPad to the office since its initial release in 2010. I’ve tried to write an “iPad at Work” series with nearly ever iteration of iPad hardware, but even with the iPad Air 2, the digitizer type hasn’t changed at all. …And that’s the big problem.

iPad

The iPad has a huge issue with palm rest technology. While you can draw or even write on an iPad screen, the digitizer can’t ignore your palm as it rests on the screen. It thinks that your palm and whatever writing instrument you’re using – be that your finger or some kind of capacitive stylus – are part of a multi-touch gesture. As such, you really can’t use the iPad to take hand written notes in meetings without hovering your hand over the screen, and that gets tired and old quickly.

I know. I’ve tried many, many times over the past few years with OneNote and Evernote, to name just a couple of note taking apps. Neither work well with handwritten notes on an iPad. And it’s a real shame and a huge pain. The iPad is popular, easy to work with and use, and with the right keyboard – now with the touch version of Microsoft Office for iOS, the iPad is a competent productivity tool… but no meeting notes, unless they’re typed, that is…

At least, that’s the way things USED to be with the iPad.

Apple introduced the iPad Pro on 2015-09-09 and that whole landscape has changed… potentially. I say potentially due to two major reasons:

  1. I’ve not used the iPad Pro and haven’t seen it, and I don’t know how well its palm rest technology works
  2. Little is known on how well it can be used as a writing instrument. I have no idea how bad the drawing/ writing latency is on this thing.

Drawing or writing latency is basically the amount of lag experienced on the device when you draw or write on its screen. You’ve passed over a certain area with the pen, and the ink doesn’t show up on the area you’ve drawn or written on for “X” amount of time after the pen has moved on. That’s latency.

This can be a huge issue if you’re trying to take notes in a meeting or in class, and you’re trying to keep up with the person who’s talking or teaching. If they’re moving quickly and your device (in this case the iPad Pro) can’t keep up, it can be a problem.

The palm rest tech seems to be acceptable on all of the demo video that has been played. There are a number of demos and videos out that show people drawing with the Apple Pencil on the iPad Pro, and they have their hand resting on the device’s screen.

Just an FYI – the new 13″ iPad Pro starts at $799 (32GB model). With the Apple Pencil ($99) and the Smart Keyboard ($169), the whole thing is $1057. With 8.25% tax, the grand total is $1155.28. The high end iPad Pro is $1079 (with the same accessories and after tax, its $1458.13).

To put that in perspective,

  1. The entry level MacBook is $1299
  2. The entry level 13″ MacBook Air is $999
  3. The high end 13″ MacBook Air is $1199
  4. The entry level 13″ MacBook Pro is $1299
  5. The entry level 15″MacBook Pro is $1999
  6. The entry level 21.5″ iMac is $1099
  7. The entry level 27″ iMac is $1799

The new iPad Pro is as expensive or more expensive than the 13″ MacBook Air, the new MacBook, the entry level MacBook Pro and the entry Level 21.5″ iMac. For the price of the high end iPad Pro (after Pencil, keyboard and taxes), you’re just $50 bucks shy of the price of the mid-range 13″ MacBook Pro (before taxes).

The use case for the iPad Pro is going to be very similar to that of the Surface Pro 3 – a business user (be they corporate, SOHO/ SMB, or creative) who needs basic productivity (MS Office for iOS), the ability to take hand written or typed notes in a meeting, or perhaps needs to do some quick brain storming and quickly sketches something out (on what in the past, would have ended up being a paper bar napkin) to make a point or capture an idea.

Consumer based use cases for the iPad Pro are few and far between. However, many consumers may fall into this particular use case, if the iPad is their primary computing device AND they’re looking to buy a new computer. The iPad Pro with its new keyboard can function as a notebook computer – the A9X processor is desktop class in its performance – with a minimal footprint. The only issue that many users may have with it is that the device – like the Surface Pro series – isn’t very lapable. The design of the keyboard may not be sturdy enough to type on or support itself without some sort of firm, flat surface under it. A lap, just may not cut it, and that may change the way some people want or need to interact with the device… at least until Apple comes out with a different keyboard or allows 3rd parties to market keyboards for the iPad Pro.

Is the iPad Pro in your future, or is it too expensive? Does its new features and desktop class hardware mean that an iPad will finally find its way into your daily work process? Why don’t you meet me in the discussion area below and give me your thoughts on it?

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