Today is the Day

Yes! Merry Christmas in May to me!

YlaUR6JpbmU0lw9AXY3WpNPx-qTYoosBmOZZgwfeQwII didn’t know if this day would actually come or not. Today (2015-05-19) is the day that my Apple Watch gets delivered. Over the next few weeks or so, I will be taking a look at it, trying to make heads or tails of what it does and doesn’t do. I’ll be reviewing it, blogging about it, and in the end comparing it to the Fitbit Surge and Microsoft Band (part 2 of the review, can be seen here . I will eventually be comparing all three of these – the Apple Watch, Fitbit Surge and Microsoft Band to a couple of other smartwatches and against a set of criteria that we will begin mulling over in a blog post or two after the Apple Watch review is posted. With three smartwatch reviews in the series, we should be able to pull together some criteria that can be used to measure the best of all five.

So, stay tuned. I’ll have an unboxing up shortly; and likely an initial impressions blog post up shortly after that. I know it’s taken a while, but stick with me on this one, kids. Things are about to get very interesting in the wearables department over here…

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Anticipation… Its making me Wait

Y’all wanna pass me the Heinz Ketchup..?


Every time I say I’m waiting for something, I hear Carly Simon in my head singing “that song;” and I see someone pouring Heinz Ketchup over a hamburger. Yes. Apparently, being a child of the ’70’s means I’m older than dirt…

Well, I have an update to my column, So…Like, I’m in Wait Mode; and I’d like to provide everyone an update. This is going to be a short one, and I’m going to hold myself to that, because if I don’t, I’m really going to go off on a specific vendor, and I really don’t want to torch the relationship I have with them. Up to now, it’s been pretty good.

Apple Watch

I ordered a 42mm Space Gray Aluminum Apple Watch Sport with Black Sport Band 13 minutes into the open order cycle on 2015-04-10. I placed an order for a 38mm Silver Apple Watch Sport with Aluminum Case with Pink Sport Band on 2015-04-12, a full two days after orders opened. The 38mm Pink Sport arrived on 2015-05-11, or the day after Mother’s Day, here in the States. This morning, I was greeted with a wonderful surprise – my 42mm Space Gray Aluminum Apple Watch Sport with Black Sport Band moved from “processing items” to “preparing for shipment” during the night. Charges for the device are pending on my credit card, and I anticipate having the Watch in my hands be week’s end.

apple watch

 Olio Model One

Olio sold out of both versions – black and silver – of all of their Model One’s. the device also seems to be doing very well. According to Olio,

“… we received the results of our latest round of water pressure testing. The Model One withstood the equivalent of 50M (164 feet) of water pressure, which is the high bar for traditional, non-dive watches, and something rarely, if ever seen in consumer electronics like smartphones. More impressively, when the microphone hole is sealed, and we air-pressure test the rest of the watch seals, we remain air-tight past 70M (230 feet), at which point standard watch pressure testing equipment can’t go higher. We’re purchasing specialty dive watch pressure testers to continue testing and optimizing those seals.

“The Model One so far has gone through over 300 distinct tests for everything from drop to impact; altitude to water pressure; extreme cold to sweltering heat; and Coca-Cola to dishwashing soap. To date, no Olio Model One front or rear crystal has broken during use. Not one. It is slated to go through many more tests in real world conditions before it reaches your wrists this summer. We are building our watches to handle whatever adventure you bring their way and we can’t wait to hear where you decide to take them.”

This is impressive. This guy isn’t going to get damaged from wearing it while exercising – be that working out or swimming – and will likely survive the standard snorkel or scuba dive – without getting damaged. However, an updated delivery date hasn’t come out of Olio yet. These are still expected sometime in “the summer of 2015.”

Pebble Time

Yeah, I have NO update at all on this guy. The original estimate for delivery of Pebble Time was “May 2015.” Pebble has just under two weeks left to make that delivery window, and there hasn’t been any kind of indication that the device will ship on time or even any kind of project update from them since 2015-05-09 (or the Friday before Mother’s Day, here in the States).

Update #17, sent out on 2015-05-04 indicated that mass production was scheduled to start that week (so, about two weeks ago, as of this writing). I am assuming everything is still on schedule. Pebble’s done this Kickstarter thing before, so they kinda know what they’re doing.

Henge Docks Horizontal Dock

Yeah… I’m not a happy camper about this one. Not happy at all.

Henge Docks announced the product in 2013. It was originally supposed to ship a year ago, but was pushed back. Henge Docks brought it to CES 2015 in the form of a prototype, and it was a HUGE success there. They opened up purchases of the dock, including its Early Adopter Program in mid-January 2015. They sold out almost instantly. Their scheduled delivery date for the Early Adopter edition, which for an extra charge, got you the dock before everyone else, plus special access to their beta firmwares and exclusive support community, was April 2015, with standard delivery for all other Horizontal Dock orders scheduled for June 2015.

They opened up the exclusive support area with an announcement they sent on 2015-03-06. You logged in, took a couple of surveys and were given the opportunity to submit bugs or suggestions. O 2015-04-10, Henge Docks announced that they were pushing back delivery of the dock due to a change in the power supply. They were upgrading the design to a 150 watt power supply from a 127 watt power supply. Between 2015-04-12 through 2015-04-26, the Henge Docks team were scheduled to travel to China to work with their manufacturing partner on assembly of the dock. Delivery of Early Adopter units had been pushed to EARLY May 2015.

I emailed Henge Docks on 2015-05-14 and received the following from their customer service department,

“At this time, we do not have a set, final ship date for the Early Adopter Horizontal Docks. As soon as we have additional information from our Product Development Team we will notify our Early Adopter Customers

“I understand the lack of information is frustrating, we are anxious to get this product out the door. If you prefer to opt out of the Early Adopter program, we understand.”

My response to them was a somewhat tepid, “thank you no. Don’t opt me out. I paid to get into that program. What I want and need is an updated delivery date for the RETAIL product I purchased.”

The organization hasn’t responded to my reply.

What’s bothering me the most here, is that there’s been no official update on this product since 2015-04-10. The organization has missed two (2) delivery dates. This was a RETAIL purchase. The dock wasn’t purchased via Kickstarter or IndieGo-Go. This was a retail purchase. The organization has taken my money and hasn’t delivered the product as of yet; and they’ve missed not only their initial shipment window, but their recast shipment window.

The Early Adopter program website so far is a ghost town. The docks haven’t been delivered; and its clear to me, given the lack of updates on the program, that there are additional engineering problems related to the 150 watt power supply. The units likely are getting too hot and there isn’t enough room for a bigger fan in the current case; or they ran onto some other engineering issue after respec-ing the bigger power supply. I’m guessing of course.

The big issue here is that Henge Docks took payment for my dock in January. They have my money. I don’t have my purchased product. The least they can do is update everyone that bought an Early Adopter unit on where we are with the whole process.

This is a big deal for me, as I want and need a true docking solution for my MacBook Pro, and have wanted one since purchasing my original MacBook Pro back in 2006. Thunderbolt docks aren’t really the way I wanted to go. I don’t want to plug and chug ANY cables in and out of my notebook computer.

I’ve purchased Henge Docks products in the past, and they’ve been totally awesome. However, I don’t like yanking my MBP in and out of a Vertical Dock. Too much torque and pressure are placed on the ports and on the device , especially when removing it from the dock, in my opinion.

That’s why I want the Horizontal Dock. Its docking mechanism is supposed to be much better on the device. I take my MacBook Pro with me everywhere I go, so it’s in and out of a dock – or would be – quite often. My other MBP’s were, as I had Vertical Docks for all of them.

I’m obviously going to keep an eye on this. If I have any additional information, I’ll post back. However, all I’m REALLY looking for here, outside of delivery of the actual product, is some kind of program update informing me when the product will ship and deliver.

In the meantime… would someone pass the ketchup..??

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Updating Windows 10 Mobile After it goes RTM

Microsoft says that it wants to push rapid updates to users; but there are issues…

Windows 10 mobile

I saw an interesting update on the Supersite for Windows this morning, and I answered a comment asking what the issues were on this in the US. I wanted to expound a bit more, so I thought I’d gather what I wrote and then start shooting my mouth off.

The original article deals with Microsoft taking control of OS related updates from the mobile carriers – in the States, that’s basically, AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint, but may also include a number of larger regional or budget carriers like US Cellular, Cricket and Boost Mobile – and making updates available roughly four to six (4 – 6) weeks after the updates go RTM. Based on a report from Ed Bott, Microsoft is serious about it. According to Terry Myerson,

“Here at Microsoft, we take our responsibility to keep Windows secure seriously. We follow up on all reported security issues, continuously probe our software with leading edge techniques, and proactively update supported devices with necessary updates to address issues. And today, we’re announcing this continuous update process applies to all Windows 10 devices, including phones.”

The only way that Windows as a Service (WaaS) REALLY works, is if Microsoft can release updates to users as they are ready.

The problem is that mobile broadband carriers in the US don’t allow just anything to ride their networks and don’t allow hardware manufacturers or OEM’s to release just any device update without that update going through a testing and certification process. Well, at least everyone but Apple; users of any cellular capable iDevice get iOS updates all the time…as soon as they’re released, in fact. I’ll deal with Apple in just a bit. However, every other device and device manufacturer/ OEM has to jump through a lot of hoops.

There are two parts to this issue: Control of the (enterprise) network and control of support. The second one is easy to understand. The first one is a PITA.

Control of Support
Many users don’t know much of anything about their smartphone past how to make and take calls, send and receive text messages, and change a status update on Facebook (or other social network). Most carriers like these types of users, because they generally accept what they are given, even if they don’t like it (which leads to the first thing, but I’ll get to that in a minute).

Because most users aren’t very tech savvy, they don’t know how to trouble shoot issues when they bump into problems, so they call their mobile carrier for support. The mobile carrier knows that support is a big issue, and don’t want to HAVE to support each and every problem that can arise, especially with exotic or little/unknown 3rd party software. So, they offer crapware that may have much the same functionality that most users are looking for and do their best to push users that way. They pay their support people to troubleshoot the crapware, and to try to get users to use it instead of a similar, and likely much more popular app that does the same thing. They can’t pay their people to know everything about every chat client, social network, photo enhancer, etc. it costs too much money to train and support them.

Control of the (Enterprise) Network
(Most) Mobile carriers don’t allow just ANY smartphone on their network. Unknown or rogue mobile devices can eat up bandwidth; and as much as they want to charge you for the bandwidth you use, mobile carriers certify devices and updates because if it rides on their network, users are going to demand support, so… they limit what can actually get on the network… or they at least try to.

Historically, this is why mobile carriers take so long to test individual devices before they actually offer them for sale; or take so long to test and certify updates before they actually go out to users of devices that use the mobile network.

Think of this the same way you think of your work computer. Your office’s IT department doesn’t let you install everything from any and every download site on the internet. Many sites are blocked to protect the network from viruses and other malware. It’s the same thing here.

All you do is use the network. You don’t own it, so the mobile carrier doesn’t allow you to do any and everything you want…. just like the office. The purpose is public communication. Your use effects the public, and the carrier has an obligation to insure that its available to all that pay to use it.

Now, all of this is SOMEWHAT based on older information. I really ran into this face first when I was a Verizon customer, living in Nashville, TN back in 2003/ 2004. I had two separate talks with a VzW store manager and a Tier 2 install technician (I had a car kit installed for my then, state of the art new, Samsung i700). The install tech who put the car kit in my Honda CRV laughed at me when I asked him why the store staff wouldn’t talk to me. I have to admit, it was kinda funny. However, he explained that I gave them fits because I knew more than they did, and had issues they couldn’t support (smartphones were new back then…). I later confirmed this with the store manager, who apologized, but didn’t offer any helpful suggestions, either.

However, the general principals here are the same now as they were then. Control… at least until you pay me (me, being the mobile carrier). Apple cut a lot of deals to get the iPhone on AT&T (and eventually VzW and T-Mo). Part of that was specifically that Apple has control of OS updates. It worked, and continues to work because Apple sells a BOAT load of iPhones. Mobile carriers make a lot of money via mobile accounts, upgrades, and other add-on related iDevice purchases.

…and volume. Let’s not forget the amount of sales volume they get. The carriers tolerate it because they make a lot of money based on iDevice sales volume.

Microsoft has a huge issue here. They simply don’t – and won’t – have the device sales volume to help them convince mobile carriers not to relinquish they’re control of their networks so Microsoft can deliver both software and firmware updates as needed. I have no idea what incentive Microsoft thinks it’s going to come up with to convince the carriers to allow this to happen. However, you would have to think that it may involve a bit of that ol’ happy cabbage… We’ll have to wait and see what and how MS does to make this happen.

What do you think about all of this? Will Microsoft be able to release updates to Windows 10 Mobile device owners as they want to; or will the US mobile carriers put a halt to it? Would these OS and firmware updates attract you to a Windows 10 Mobile device over, say, an Android device or iDevice?

I’d really like to hear from you on this, so why don’t you join me in the discussion area, below, and give me your thoughts on it all.

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Where’s Apple’s Media Server??

Am I missing something, or has the whole world gone out to lunch..?


Ok… if you haven’t guessed by now, I am a tweener.

I sit firmly in between both the Apple and Microsoft eco systems with my feet firmly planted in the middle of the pool. I’ve got a boat load of Apple gear (with a “What I Use” column pending…) – an iPad, iPhone, MacBook Pro and of course, an Apple Watch (and no, if you’re at all curious if my Watch shows that its shipping early, it isn’t, doggone it).

On the Microsoft side, I’ve got a Surface Pro 3, a Dell Latitude 10 ST2, and of course a Microsoft Band (part 2 of its review can be seen here). I also run a Windows 7 VM via Parallels Desktop on my MacBook Pro to enable me to write Windows-based software reviews. Much of my early writing career was also spent as a Windows Mobile/ Pocket PC Microsoft MVP nominee and in covering Microsoft on both WUGNET – The Windows User’s Group Network and in the Computing Pro Forum over at AOL/CompuServe.

So, yeah… firmly planted in both camps.

When it comes to digital media, though, I am wholly and totally a Mac. The iPod, iPhone and iPad have made it too easy to take your media where ever you want, and since I’ve been firmly planted in the Mac camp since I made the total switch in 2010 or so it makes sense for me to really have all of my digital content in iTunes instead of anywhere else. I’m not much of an Android person any longer, having moved back to an iPhone with the iPhone 4S from a Nexus One; and because Microsoft is just now getting its act back together again when it comes to a digital media store and ecosystem, again, being on the Apple side of this fence just seems to make perfect sense.

So, here’s the big issue I have with all of this. I hate streaming stuff over the internet.

I know that may come as a shock to many people, but hear me out first, before you color me beyond crazy and write me off…

Yes. I have Netflix. Yes. I have Hulu. Yes, I’ve used Pandora and iTunes Radio and the like (but honestly, I don’t use those last two a lot, due to mobile bandwidth caps. That’s a whole other story on streaming, so please… pleASE, PLEASE… don’t get me started on that!). But when I – or anyone for that matter stream content over the internet – there’s a GREAT deal of space between me and whatever server I’m trying to get content from; and WAY too much can happen between there and here to block, impede or otherwise slow down the receipt of streamed content to my TV set, or receiving device f choice. If at all possible, I’d really much prefer to stream content across my home network. Its totally self contained and much more reliable. If I have problems with the streaming, I know those issues are within my control to resolve…, which gets me back to my opening question – Where (the hell) is Apple’s Media Server?

See, when first introduced back in January of 2001, iTunes synchronized content from your local hard drive to its portable music player, the iPod. When Apple introduced Time Capsule back in January of 2008, I thought, from an iTunes perspective, that I had died and gone to heaven. Here’s why:

  1. Time Capsule has more storage than my Mac
    My 15″ Late 2013 MacBook Pro Retina has a 512GB SSD. I just upgraded my Time Capsule to 6TB of space. That’s 12 times more space than my current Mac.
  2. All my Apple Stuff sits on my Home Network
    That would include my family’s Macs (there are currently 5), my AppleTV, my iPhones, iPads, iPods, my (soon to arrive… hear that, Apple..? SOON TO ARRIVE..!!) Apple Watch and of course, my Time Capsule. With 12x more space than my Mac, it has ALL of my iTunes content backed up on it. All of it. However, as far as my Mac and any of my iDevices are concerned, my Time Capsule may as well be a boat anchor. None of them can see it, or the three plus terabytes of content stored there.

And I’d like to expound a bit on that…

While I can definitely browse my home network and find stuff there on any of the computers in the house, my AppleTV and none of my other iDevices can see any of that content. iOS doesn’t include a file browser. It doesn’t make a lot of sense to have a cool NAS product like Time Capsule, with the ability to have a large, upgradable hard drive on your home network, without having the ability to stream content locally.

That’s the idea behind a media center or media server computer on your home network. That server allows you to stream content across a home network, bypassing all of the inherent latency and other bandwidth issues and downloading problems that many often bump into when trying to watch content on HBO Go (or other cable network premium channel iOS app) or Netflix or Hulu over the internet.

There are likely third party products out there that can do this, and that’s all fine and good; but what I don’t understand is why Apple doesn’t have a way to set this up as part of the out of box setup process for Time Capsule. This is totally a huge hole in the product.

I know that Time Capsule was initially released as a companion to Apple’s Time Machine. The two can work seamlessly together; and Time Machine will default to it if it finds a Time Capsule on your home network (it will also create one via the Airport Express base station that’s part of its make up). However, not everyone uses Time Capsule that way; and more importantly, I don’t. I have a dedicated 2TB LaCie drive that’s connected to my Mac via Firewire 800. It does a great job connected to a port on my Thunderbolt Monitor that would otherwise go unused.

However, let’s get back to Apple, Time Capsule and what you can do with what you (may already) have.

You can always copy all of your music to your Time Capsule and then ALT/Option Right-Click iTunes, iPhoto or Photos and open an alternate library location, and that’s cool, but that doesn’t really hack it. All this does it put your iTunes library on a home network location. If you do that with a MacBook or MacBook Pro, you can’t use iTunes to listen to or anything on your Mac when you’re out and about (unless you have a local library that you update with the (new) content you want to watch or listen to before you go). In this case, you’re maintaining multiple iTunes libraries, and who wants to do that??

You can install something like Plex, which according to TWiT does a really good job; and it does have a NAS component, for Netgear, QNAP, unRAID, Drobo and the like; but it doesn’t support Time Capsule. That’s the solution that I, and I think so many other Apple fans want.

I’ve written a note to Tim Cook, asking where something like this that would naturally and automatically hook into a Time Capsule might be; but that was a couple weeks ago, and I haven’t heard anything from Mr. Cook regarding an answer. This isn’t the first time I’ve asked this question of Tim Cook, and it probably won’t be the last; but I have a feeling, that no matter how many times I ask it, I’m going to end up with the same answer – silence.

UPDATE: While writing this column, a new article came out on Neowin. Apparently, Microsoft has killed Windows Media Center in Windows 10. It won’t be part of the end game for Microsoft either. I hate to say it, but I have a feeling that I’m not going to see anything like that come out of the Apple camp at all…ever. It just seems as though the whole idea of streaming content across your home network, FROM your home network, is a dead issue, which is totally sad (and totally crazy…)

The last thing I’m going to say on this subject – hear me and hear me well. Until the day when ISP’s are true Title Two utilities, AND until the average speed across the entire nation is well above 50-75Mpbs down (with that being the totally suckiest speed, ever), things like Netflix and Hulu and other streaming services aren’t going to take hold and be the must have services they want to be. Last mile issues aside, issues with general traffic and bandwidth I think will always be a concern until full Title Two as well as super speeds are common place in the United States.

What do you think of all of this? Will Apple create their own media server? Is Time Capsule the best way to go for holding and serving up a local copy? Why don’t you join me in the Discussion Area below, and tell me what you think?

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So… Like, I’m in Wait Mode

There’s a lot happening and I’m all set to hurry up and wait; and it sucks.

I’ve got a lot to be thankful for and I truly feel blessed.

I have a wife and family that love me. I have a great job. I have a great gig here at Soft32. I actually think it’s one of the best sites I’ve ever written for, and I’ve written for a GREAT many over the past 20 or so years including CMPnet, WUGNET. AOL/CompuServe, Gear Diary, pocketnow, InformationWeek, LockerGnome, plus a number of print pubs including >, Computer Power User Magazine and a Sun-Times affiliated newspaper – The Aurora Beacon-News. Definitely blessed.

All of the writing over the years has kept me in baseball cards and bubble gum, for sure. I’ve been able to afford to buy a number of different technology items and write about them that in just about any other life scenario, I simply wouldn’t have been able to afford to do.

Case in point… I’ve got a number of different things cued up for this Summer and Fall, but I’m stuck in a wait and see mode, or stuck waiting for something to ship. Here’s a run-down of all that I’ve got queued up. I’m going to try to sort these by the time I am supposed to have something in hand, though it will likely be a few weeks after they are received before I have anything written and/ or posted about them.

Henge Docks Horizontal Dock – Mid-May 2015
This one has been a LONG time in coming.


I’ve been a huge fan of docking stations since, like, the invention of the notebook computer; but really back in the mid to late 1990’s. I’ve had a number of Dell laptops – mostly Latitudes – that have had docks, and I’ve had docks at work and at home with nearly EVERY work PC I’ve ever used in my entire life, including every Dell and Lenovo I’ve ever put my hands on. However, Apple doesn’t believe in docking stations. Not even a little bit.

Apple’s take, even when they were still including a full blown Ethernet port in their notebooks, is that notebooks were meant to be portable; and you really don’t want to tie yourself down to a wired internet connection. You want to be wireless. That’s why you have a notebook PC.

Well, sorta.

I have a notebook PC because I want to be able to compute in a non-standard place like the beach, my deck, or a place where they sell overpriced coffee. The problem is, I still want to be able to use that notebook PC with some desktop styled resources – like a mouse, external keyboard (be they wired or wireless) and most importantly, a large, HD monitor. If you stick to Apple’s way of doing things when you get to a an office setting, you constantly plug and chug cables in out of ports on your MacBook or MacBook Pro… which totally sucks… hence the need/ desire for a docking station or port replicator

Henge Docks has been making (somewhat) affordable vertical docks for years. They announced their Horizontal Docking Station more than two years ago, and I pre-ordered it almost immediately. I’ve been waiting on it ever since.

The dock is finally supposed to ship in mid-May 2015; and as part of their Early Adopter Program, I’ll have access to enhanced functionality, frequent updates and special user forums where I and a number of other folks will be able to provide feedback on the device directly to Henge Docks.

When it arrives, I’m going to have to reconfigure the top of the desk in my office. Specifically, I’m going to need to reassess how I’ve got my dual monitors positioned. I may also need to get a bigger or different second/ third monitor, as the 22″ SD monitor I’ve got just isn’t cutting it anymore.

Apple Watch Sport Edition – Mid-to-Late May 2015
As I said the other day, I got my Apple Watch before things totally sold out. I should be getting mine in the third or fourth wave of shipments. My watch is scheduled to ship between 2015-05-13 and 2015-05-27.


I seem to remember seeing one or two articles over the past week or so indicating that preorders MIGHT ship earlier than originally estimated, but I haven’t heard anything else to refute or substantiate that claim. If I had to guess, I’d say things with either ship during my originally estimated window or later than that.

While people wait for their Watches to arrive, everyone everywhere is going to be inundating the internet with a bunch of fluff. You’ll see information about Apple supplied bands, third party bands, uses and ideas for Watch and of course, different apps. You’re also going to see a lot of coverage about how Watch isn’t going to be as intuitive or easy to use as every other Apple product on the market.

Concierge Appointments are going to be an interesting topic to follow and until Watches start arriving and people start making and attending appointments, we’re not going to know what they are really going to cover.

Pebble Time – May 2015
Pebble Time is Pebble’s latest venture into the wearables market. The device is an update to their previous Kickstarter Campaign provides a couple of new options.


This time, you get a color display and up to seven days of battery life out of a single charge. While there are definitely updates to the Pebble watch OS to take advantage of the new color display and some new capabilities. I have no idea what we’re REALLY going to see with this, but we’ll have to wait and see. While I suspect that it’s going to be VERY Pebble – i.e. basically the same as Pebble and Pebble Steel, but with a color display, but again, I’m going to want to wait and see the actual device in my hands before making any final determinations.

Olio Model One – Summer 2015 (Meaning somewhere between July and October)
This is the one smartwatch that I really know little to nothing about. The only information that I have on it is what you can find on their home page. This isn’t much information to go on at all.


I’ve spoken briefly with the organization’s CEO via email. He didn’t offer any additional information, other than the organization is excited to release the device in limited availability later this year.

The device looks amazing. The big thing that is going to make or break this device is notifications and the way it works with them. If it’s an all or nothing thing as it is with other smartwatches or fitness bands, then Olio isn’t going to do very well. Unfortunately, because there’s little to no additional information on how Olio intends to deal with notification overload, this is another wait and see item.

Windows 10 RTM – Summer 2015
Windows 10 is supposed to RTM (release to manufacturing) sometime this Summer, which again, means between July and October of 2015. If Microsoft wants to have Windows 10 in the hands of manufacturers and OEM’s in time for back to school computer sales, then it better be as early in the “summer” as possible. If they do hit their advertised release window, then they may make it in time to hit Back to School; but then again, it may not be enough time.

Based on what I know about my own experience right now, and the one huge bug that I have logged – Disappearing Ink – hitting this window is going to be difficult at best. They have a number of different issues to get past and with the way that builds are being released even to the Fast Ring, I’m really going to be surprised if they make it in time. I don’t think they will. My Disappearing Ink bug has been around for at least 6 Fast Ring builds, and it’s a huge defect. I don’t know that they’re going to get to the end game in time to make Back to School PC releases.

However, until they have a fix for Disappearing Ink, I’m off the Fast Ring, especially on my Surface Pro 3. I’ve got too much going on with OneNote at the office to risk losing information and notes during a meeting while using Windows 10. I also downloaded Windows 10 for Mobile 10051 on my Lumia 520, and I agree with Paul, Mary Jo and Leo. The latest Windows 10 build for Window Phones just plain sucks. Oh… it’s really horrible.

UPDATE: While writing this an article appeared on Microsoft News attributing AMD’s CEO, Lisa Su, with a statement that Windows 10 would RTM in July. Early Monday morning, 2015-04-20, as I was finishing up this column, I also stumbled upon a reiteration of this same attribution, but this time with a full quote on the Windows Supersite. Here’s the full quote, given during AMD’s Quarterly Earning’s call:

“…What we also are factoring in is, you know, with the Windows 10 launch at the end of July, we are watching sort of the impact of that on the back-to-school season, and expect that it might have a bit of a delay to the normal back-to-school season inventory build-up…”

This statement fails to indicate if the July release is Windows 10 for desktop, Phones or small tablets, or ALL devices.

Given the issues that are currently being encountered in all platforms, I’d be surprised if this was for everything. Desktop, maybe; but all platforms…? No.

iOS 9 and OS X 10.11
WWDC currently scheduled for 2015-06-08 through 2015-06-12. At that time, I’m expecting announcements for both iOS 9 and OS X 10.11. However, while this is pretty much a safe bet, there’s no guarantee on this either. No one has really started grinding the iOS 9 grindstone. No one has been beating the “I really need the next version of OS X to do ‘this'” drum.

So far as I can tell, the only thing that most people have been saying about both iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 is that they’d really like the next versions to work better than the current versions. So maybe both will be stability and bug fix releases. However, given that they’re both going up against a huge release in Windows 10, it’s unlikely that that will happen.

While this may be seen as a good thing for Apple fans and users, in the end, it may not be. Adding new features on top of a release that isn’t as solid as it could be could be a big problem in the end. Unfortunately, as information is going to be lacking until at least after the WWDC Keynote, this is yet another wait and see item.

So as you can see… I’m stuck.

I’ve got more wait and see items than I do actual stuff to look at right now.

What are you most interested in seeing this year? Are you waiting for anything in particular? Did you order an Apple Watch? Will you get it before school starts in the States in the Fall? Did you order another wearable? Is there going to be high demand for iOS 9 or OS X 10.11? Do you think that Windows 10 will make a July release date, or will it be delayed until later?

Why don’t you join me in the discussion area, below, and give me your thoughts.

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Yes, I got my Apple Watch Before it Sold Out

But it won’t ship on 2015-04-24…

w42ss-sbbk-selEarly adopters and tech journalists (which are usually one in the same thing, at least on my end) know the drill when it comes to ordering a brand new iDevice – you get up in the middle of the night, wearily shuffle your feet down the hallway, nearly tripping over socks, underwear (?!?) and a Tonka truck only to step on a lone Lego block hiding in some obscure location on the floor causing you to want to cry out and swear with every four-letter word known in your native language (but you don’t ’cause it’s the middle of the night, and you don’t want to wake anyone…). So… you hobble the rest of the way to the computer desk, with muffled words held back in your mouth and tears running down your cheeks

In my case, its 1:55am CDT; and orders for the new iDevice (in this case, the Apple Watch, but the same thing happened recently with the iPhone 6…) begin in six (6) minutes. By this time, however, I’ve got myself seated, wiped the tears from my eyes and have begun refreshing my browser that’s pointed to Apple’s Online Store, specifically at the Watch’s order page.

The site still shows that its down, and that’s ok, because officially, orders don’t start until 2:01am CDT. However, that time comes and goes with the site still showing that it’s updating. That’s when I really began to understand that there was a bigger demand for Watch than some – including me – had originally thought there would be.

Initially, everyone thought that the demand for watch would be high. However, since Apple Watch requires an iPhone 5 or later, many thought that it would be easy to get, including me.

Totally…TOTALLY not the case.

I got up in plenty of time, and I started refreshing my browser early enough in order to catch an available connection on the server when one opened up. The problem was that nearly everyone ELSE in the world was apparently doing the same thing.

I was able to order and reserve my Apple Watch Sport by 2:13am CDT; but I was shocked that my delivery time was pushed out 4 – 6 weeks (delivery will take place between 2015-05-13 and 2015-05-27.

Four to six weeks. FOUR TO SIX WEEKS!! REALLY??! OMG!

You know that means that the initial stock that Apple was able to secure for Launch sold out in less than twelve (12) minutes, right?

… In less than 12 minutes!

It also means that a great many people didn’t trust the whole, “reserve a time to try on and buy your Apple Watch” thing in order to make certain that they were able to actually secure a Watch. It also means that those that were able to actually get a Watch did exactly what Angela Ahrendts wanted them to do and bought Watch online as soon as orders for it opened up.


More stock of the device was actually allocated TO the brick and mortar stores offering Watch appointments than to the online store so that orders at try-on appointments could be fulfilled. It kinda makes me wonder how many devices were on hand and available to ship at both the online store.

However, I’m very lucky.

From what I’ve been able to see, if you didn’t get in and order one by 2:15am CDT, your order got pushed to a “June” delivery time. June. Inside of 15 minutes, your delivery date got pushed from 2014-04-24 to between 2015-05-13 to 27, to June (without any kind of date range). June..!


…and I got that delivery time frame at 2:15am CDT when I tried to see, just for grins and giggles, what the time would be pushed to for orders that got placed after mine. Delivery times have stayed at “June” since then, and are still listed as “June” as of this writing (11am CDT). It kind of makes me wonder if Apple did the same thing with Watch as Olio did with the initial manufacturing run of their Model One – create hype and a sense of increased value and desire due to rarity, as many devices aren’t available until 2-3 months after pre-orders open. However, I’m not sure that was an active strategy here for Apple. It happens a great deal with all of their latest, high-demand products like iPhone and iPad.

Apple Insider had the same thought, but quickly dismissed the idea. It is very “unApple-like.” However, when initial stock sells out in less than 5-10 minutes, you have to wonder if it might not be true. It does appear, however, that the supply chain for Watch is even more constrained than iPhone, which is really saying something.

I was hoping to have the review of Apple Watch available on Soft32 at least in part, during the month of April. Now it looks as though we’re going to have to wait until May or so for the unboxing. I’m a bit disappointed, too. I was really hoping not to have such a long period of time between the candidates in this round up.

Until then, keep checking back here. I will likely have a bit of news and other fun tidbits as we get ready for the arrival of Apple Watch (and a couple others…) in the next four to six weeks.

Did you order Apple Watch? If not, will you? Are you planning on it or waiting until either later this year; or will you wait until version 2.0 of Watch comes out (some time in the next year or so)? I’d love to hear your opinion and thoughts on the matter. Why don’t you join me in the discussion area below and let me know what you think?

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Olio – Did the Cat Finally Build a Smarter Mouse Trap?

Contestant number five has entered the ring…


One of the bigger things to hit the market this year is wearables. Things like Microsoft Band (part two of the review can be seen here), the Fitbit Surge, the Apple Watch (review pending arrival of the hardware), Pebble Time and Time Steel are all wearables – specifically smartwatches – that will have been released or will be released later this year. As of the first of this month (yes, April 1st; but no, this isn’t a joke), a new player has thrown their hat into the ring – meet the Olio Model One.

The device…? Oh my stars and garters, yes! Have you seen this thing?!

The Model One is beautiful. It’s made of stainless steel and basically comes in two flavors – (brushed?) Stainless Steel and Black. And while it is DEFINITELY drool-worthy, it’s got a few hurdles to get past.

The device itself runs on a proprietary OS

According to Olio, people spend WAY too much time in their computers, in their smartphones and tablets and shortly, in their smartwatches… that are tethered and tied to their smartphones. Olio wants their users to think of the Model One as an extension of themselves and not something that drives them or makes them live in it. As such, there’s no app store to bury you in apps. You get what you’re given (at least initially).

While the device obtains connectivity via both Android and iOS wireless devices, there aren’t any apps for you to run on the watch other than the ones that come with the device. While it does have an “assistant” of sorts, called Olio Assist, providing time saving suggestions, the limited – but value-added – functionality of (just) what comes out of the box, is where Olio sees the Model One hitting the sweet spot. You don’t get lost or waste hours of time playing Flappy Bird (or one of its many device based, or online clones). Instead, you focus on the information you need and only the information you need, so you spend time instead to your family, friends and loved ones.

However, most of the world wants apps. Its why we buy smart devices, and without an app store or a market (more on that, below), you have to wonder what the draw will be? Yeah it looks GREAT; and people at Tech Crunch, The Verge, and Gizmodo, all think saving you from “notification hell” is the bomb; and maybe it is.

Maybe it is….

I know that it drove me a bit nuts with the Microsoft Band, and it didn’t work right on the Surge; but when things are configurable, as they are on Band (and are supposed to be on the Surge), then you have to think a bit more about the purchase. For example, there aren’t any apps or even an app store for Band, either… (and its $400 cheaper).

And by the way, there’s no fitness band functionality here that I can see. This is a smartwatch and not a smartwatch that also measures physical activity. It doesn’t have any activity sensors, a GPS, a accelerometer, or a gyroscope. The functionality appears limited at this time.

It’s Expensive
Yeah… let’s talk about that for a sec.

While Microsoft Band is clearly affordable at $199.99, the Olio Model One is $345 – $395 for the Steel flavor and $495 – $545 for the Black flavor as of this writing with the $250 “friends and family” discount that’s being extended to the public. Normally, we’re talking $595 – $645 for Steel and $745 – $795 for Black (which puts their metal link bracelets at around $50 bucks over their leather bands).

The Olio Model One runs in the same neighborhood as the Apple Watch and Apple Watch Sport. The pricing models may be very different, but their close enough to be similar. You can clearly get a decent and high end analog watch for about as much AND get the band you want, too.

The device has a stainless steel case and an ion exchange glass touch screen that is supposed to survive impacts and resist scratches. It has wireless charging with a battery that can last a full two days with full functionality and then an additional two days, if you turn off connectivity to its Bluetooth-LE radio. The Model One can communicate with both Siri and Google Now via Olio Assist; and can control third party smart devices like thermostats and lights. It’s also water resistant so you don’t have to worry about ruining it when you take a swim.

The Model One is clearly a premium product; and maybe all of this is worth the premium price to you. I’m skeptical at best, at least until I have it in my hands.

It’s got an Initial Production Run of Just 1000
The Model One is a limited edition device.

Other companies release things in “limited edition,” and then they really aren’t limited at all. Olio’s first run of the Model One is limited to 1000 units – Five hundred of each the Steel and Black flavors. According to Olio,

“We decided to do a very limited production for its first release because the company is committed to the quality and craftsmanship and wanted to make sure that every piece holds up the high standards of the company. Olio compares themselves to a craft brewery, and aren’t trying to be everything to everyone.”

Olio likens itself to a craft beer brewery. Brian Ruben from said it best, I think. “if I buy a six-pack of a craft brew and I don’t like what I drink, I’m not out $600. Plus, I don’t have to call tech support.”

While the limited run and the high price are, I think, partial marketing tools to help create hype (as well as tech coverage by a number of different outlets, including yours truly and Soft32, at the end of the day you have to wonder how viable a company with such a limited production run with such a high end product will be. Olio appears to be artificially creating a limited supply in order to make the device’s value appear higher. Things that are rare ARE considered more valuable.

Diamonds, like the Hope Diamond, with such a highly desired cut, level of clarity and precision cut ARE rare and ARE very valuable. Olio hopes that watch aficionados see the Model One in the same light and don’t ding it for its digital guts as they do with nearly every other smartwatch; and with nothing really to compare it to (the Apple Watch isn’t even available for pre-order as of this writing, and hasn’t hit the market with either a splash or a thud…), it’s hard to see how well or how poorly the Olio Model One will do.

Have you seen the Olio Model One? Does it interest you? Will you buy one? Stay tuned to Soft32 as 2015 truly does appear to be the Year of Wearables. I’ll have more coverage on devices as they are released or as they make news.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, please let me know in the comments and discussion area, below.

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The next item up for review in our smartwatch round-up is the Fitbit Surge. Let’s take a look…



My quest to stop being a fat slob continues.

What to do, how much of it to do and what else I need to do to keep myself healthy is a never ending battle… and its not easy. There are way too many different daily challenges that present themselves.  Am I moving enough?  Am I eating right?  Am I sleeping right? These questions are difficult to answer as it is, and Fitbit has been trying to help people answer it for more than a few years now.

Their latest foray into fitness band/ smartwatch arena is the Fitbit Surge. It has a few nice things to offer not only the fitness conscious, but the smartwatch curious as well; and in this article, we’ll be taking a look at its suitability in both arenas.

This is the second review in a series – or round up – of smartwatch reviews that I’m doing.  The first on the Microsoft Band was large and in depth enough for me to break it up into two parts. You can see them here and here.  Its good and certainly worthy of more than a casual look.

My review of the Fitbit Surge is likely going to be just as lengthy and just as in depth. I’m going to pick apart the hardware. I’m going to pick apart the software. Smartwatches aren’t cheap. The Microsoft Band is $199… IF you can find one to buy.  I’ll cover the cost of the Fitbit a bit later, but I will say that it isn’t cheap, either.

Is the Fitbit Surge the right smartwatch and fitness band for you? Let’s stop dawdling and get down to it!


Like the Microsoft Band, the Fitbit Surge is a single piece of hardware.  It has a wide, silicone/ rubber band with a traditional, aluminum alloy buckle.  Its much easier to wear than the Microsoft Band, as there’s a great deal of give and flexibility in the Fitbit’s rubber band.  Aside from the same kind of issues that you might find in wearing any other sports watch, band or bracelet made of silicone or rubber – where you sweat a great deal and your skin may become irritated due to a lack of exposure to air – the Fitbit wears the way you would expect a sports watch to wear.  Honestly, I was very pleased with the way it felt while it was on. The only comfort issues I had were related to breathabiltity.

Wearability and Usability

I’ve been wearing the Fitbit Surge for quite some time now – well over six weeks.  The device is easy to wear and its very comfortable.  However, there are a few things about it that I am not too crazy about.  Part of that is esthetics, part of that is design and while the device is comfortable to wear, it does have Wearability issues.

 The first thing that I noticed about it is that its BIG, even the small sized Surge is big.  The device comes in 3 sizes, small, large and extra-large.  However, size doesn’t relate to device size, it relates to band length and the size wrists it fits. The device itself is 1.34″ wide (34mm) and the screen is 0.82″ x 0.96″ (21mm x 24mm).

 Here are the sizing requirements, direct from Fitbit:

    • Small fits wrists that are 5.5″ x 6.3″ (13.94cm x 16.00cm) in diameter.
    • Large fits wrists that are 6.3″ x 7.8″ (16.00cm x 19.81cm) in diameter.
  • X-Large fits wrists that are 7.8″ x 8.9″ (19.81cm x 220.61cm) in diameter.X-Large is available as an online only purchase.

There are a couple of gotchas here that you need to be aware of.  While they aren’t mission critical, they are important to be aware of so that you can deal with the issues they present.

  1. The wrist band is made of silicone or rubber
    Wearing a silicone band in and of itself isn’t bad, unless you’re allergic to the rubber.  Even if you aren’t allergic to it, you need to make certain you spend some time with the band off.  Silicone can often cause rashes and other skin irritation, and its important that you spend at least some inactive time during the day with the band off, especially if you start to notice any dry, red or flakey skin, or if you start to have some other sort of skin reaction to prolonged wear of the device.
  2. The device, though flexible is bulky
    While the band in and of itself is flexible, the actual Surge itself, is stiff and bulky. The Surge is much more comfortable to wear than the Microsoft Band but the actual electronics of the device go out a bit farther than you might think.  Its clear that Fitbit have created a device that’s very compact, but if you look at it from the side and feel around the ends of band near the actual device FOR the device, you’ll see that its actually a lot bigger than just the screen.

The device itself is, well… ugly.

I hate to say it, but it is.  It’s a lot bulkier than it first appears or seems and its one piece construction means that you don’t have any kind of style choices with it.  Other Fitbit devices like the Apple Watch and even the Fitbit Flex have interchangeable bands. The Surge is a single piece unit, and… right now… you can have ANY color you want… as long as its black.  It’s the only color currently available.  The Surge is supposed to be available in blue and tangerine, but as of this writing, both are currently – still – unavailable. I’ve had my Surge for about two months or so. It was announced at CES and black was the only color available then.  You would think by now – or at least, I did – that the other two colors – which, quite honestly, aren’t all that attractive either – would be available by now.

However, don’t expect to be able to change bands. Unlike the Apple Watch or even the Fitbit Flex, this is an all in one unit, and you’d better be happy with the color choice(s) you make. Once you buy the device, its yours to keep; and there’s no way to change colors or change bands. What you buy is all that you get.


If the Microsoft Band got notifications right, the Fitbit Surge doesn’t even come close.  On the Band, it was very easy to overdo notifications, as you could choose to have ALL of your notifications from your phone come over to Band, or you could choose specific ones that it does and keep the vibrations down to a dull roar.

With the Fitbit Surge, its exactly the opposite. You have just a single on-off setting for notifications on the device and then you get only notification of incoming text messages or incoming phone calls.

That’s it.

That can be good or bad, depending on what you’re looking for Surge to do.  If all you’re looking for is basic notifications from incoming messaging, you may be in luck.  As I said, the only notifications that the Fitbit Surge picks up are text messages and incoming phone calls.  If you’re looking to get notifications from upcoming appointments, Facebook Messenger or some other app on your phone, you’re out of luck.

The other big problem I have with notifications on the Fitbit Surge, is that the device doesn’t seem to understand or know when I don’t want them, or want them to stop.  I had notifications turned on for a while on the Fitbit, but have recently turned them off, as I didn’t need BOTH it AND the Microsoft Band buzzing my wrists every time my iPhone received a message, a phone call, or some other event occurred.

So, as I said, I turned notifications off on both bands.  Interestingly enough, Notifications on the Surge are still occasionally received, even though they are clearly turned off on the watch. I have no idea why. This is clearly a huge bug, as there shouldn’t be any notifications coming over at all.

However it clearly shows that the device’s software is capturing the notification and broadcasting the data. It clearly shows that the watch is receiving it through the Bluetooth partnership created on the device, even though its not supposed to be collecting ANY data at all. I’m seeing issues on both ends of the pairing; and its problematic at best. The fix for this – and it definitely needs to be addressed – will likely involve both a software update on your smartphone as well as a firmware update to the device.

UPDATE – The more that I wear the Fitbit Surge, the more I continue to have issues and problems with Notifications coming to it when they are clearly turned off on the device.  While the device does not alert that any text messages have come it, they are clearly coming across and they should not.


This is an issue that needs to be resolved immediately.

Battery Life

Battery life on the Fitbit Surge is actually pretty good. Compared to the Micrsoft Band, though, nearly ANYTHING would have better battery life… Well, not everything… the Apple Watch won’t last longer than 18 hours. The Micrsoft Band lasts 36 to 48 hours (even if you have Bluetooth turned off and sync via the USB cable).

The Fitbit Surge on the other hand, will last the better part of a week, even with all of the stuff that it does and all of the activities it tracks. Since the Surge tracks nearly everything you do, including sleep, the best thing to do when you do have to charge it is to charge it when you know you’re going to be inactive, or when you can’t wear it.  Swimming and showering come to mind as good candidate times when you might want to charge your Surge.  While the device is DEFINITELY water resistant, I wouldn’t hold it under water for long periods of time. Its not a perfect world, and my luck would have it getting water damage.

The biggest problem that I’ve found with the Surge is that it doesn’t give you a lot of warning when the battery is low, and you might find yourself out and about when you DO get a low battery warning. I’ve actually had mine die on me a time or two because I didn’t get an early enough warning that the battery was level was low.


The Fitbit Surge uses Bluetooth 4.0 to connect to your smartphone. I’ve found that while there are there are issues with this on other devices, the Surge specifically doesn’t use Bluetooth LE. I’m not certain if that’s why there are less connectivity issues with it as opposed to the Pebble Steel and Microsoft Band that I currently own.  Perhaps it is, and points to some larger issues with BT-LE devices.

What I can say about the Fitbit Surge is that while its connection to my iPhone 6 is much more stable, it isn’t as reactive or responsive as other devices are.  When implemented correctly, BT-LE devices tend to see their paired counterparts better and will actively connect when in range (though there’s even issues with this, as you can see in my article), as opposed to devices that do not pair with a BT-LE profile.

While I have less connectivity issues with my Surge, and while the battery life is decent even with its Bluetooth radio on all the time, I have found that data doesn’t come across the pairing unless the application is open and active. This means that I need to be actively using the app for the sync to work and pull data over.  Leaving it run in the background doesn’t do much… at least not consistently. I see this more as a Bluetooth issue rather than an issue with the Surge.

When you pair your Fitbit Surge with your smartphone, you’re going to see two connection partnerships – one for the Surge and one for Surge (Classic). The connection for the Surge is the one that you’d expect to see, and the one that is responsible for all of the connectivity and communication between the device and your smartphone.  If you want to use your Surge to control music playback, you need to enable Bluetooth Classic in the Settings app on the watch. After your Surge and your smartphone are paired, you can use it to control music playback.

To do so, open up a music app on your smartphone.  Then, double tap the home (left side) button on the Surge.  This will bring up the music control app on its display.  You will see your Surge attempting to connect via the (Classic) pairing, and then the current song’s meta data should appear on the watch face’s display.  You can pause the current song’s playback or skip to the next track. Unfortunately, not all music apps broadcast track information, which means that when using apps that don’t do that, the song title won’t appear on your Surge. However, you can still pause or skip to the next track.

I can see where this might be a great tool for someone who is exercising to NOT have to pull out their phone to control their playlist. Depending on where you have your phone stashed (not everyone fancies or trusts an armband case…), you may have to break your stride or stop exercising all together to retrieve and return your phone to its original place of storage.

However, I’ve tried this, and while its easier than pulling a phone from a shirt or pants pocket while running or walking, it isn’t totally a walk in the park, either. You’re going to need to get used to the interface and controls. You can pause, play, and skip songs. You’re going to have to pull your phone out if you’ want to repeat or replay any tracks or if you want to change playlists, midflight.

If you wear glasses for reading, you may have issues reading the audio file’s metadata, provided that your music app of choice transmits that information, on the Surge’s screen. While this isn’t a deal breaker, you do need to be aware of its limitations. Its hard to handle all of the varied functionality with only three buttons; AND to do it while you’re moving, too.

UPDATE – While writing this review of the Fitbit Surge, I’ve had it synching to my iPhone. Over the past few weeks, I’ve started to notice a few issues with Bluetooth connectivity between them both. They always seemed to work and play well together.

Right now, they are not; and NOTHING has changed on either end to warrant the issue in their pairing.  They just seem to not be looking at each other right now unless I absolutely tell them to get together. This is problematic at best, as when I started my Fitbit Surge journey, getting these two together was the easiest paring I’ve ever seen.  It just worked… straight out of the box.  Now, its like they love each other, but their not “in” love.


This is yet another reason why I think that while Bluetooth offers a LOT of potential, it has REAL issues as a data communications and transmission technology and conduit.

Software and Interfaces

I’ll get into Fitbit’s smartphone software in a minute, but I have to say something here, that’s bothered me since I started wearing the Surge – The information that it tracks and collects isn’t stored in Apple Health. Its stored in Fitbit’s proprietary program.  The app doesn’t share or swap data with Apple Health, and it really seems like it should. Some of what it does can’t be done in Apple Health, and that’s fine, but there really should be a way to have data from your iPhone and the data from you’re the Surge work and play well together, especially where Fitbit falls short.

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