Give the Governor, hu-rumph!

I bumped into something that I want to add my own $0.02 (two cents) to…

Not many folks around today will recognize the title of this article. It’s a line from the 1974 (now classic) comedy, Blazing Saddles; and I’m crying right now with laughter, going over the scene in my head…

Anyway, I often use the line when I’m looking for people to blindly agree with me (the underlying context of the quote…) and I also often use it when I agree with something that others have said. I bumped into something that a former coworker said today while reading some email and browsing the internet and I wanted to post it here to show my agreement, but I also wanted to add my own two cents to the subject.

Paul Thurrott’s Short Takes are a throwback to his WUGNET days. Paul put out a newsletter every Friday where he humorously recapped the tech happenings of the week. He continued that after he started his Supersite for Windows and continues it still on Thurrott.com today.

Anyway, in his Short Takes for Friday 2017-04-01, Paul had the following to say regarding the rollout of the Windows 10 Creator’s Update,

Microsoft: Windows 10 Creators Update will roll out over “several months”

After a wide-ranging series of reliability and quality issues scuttled Microsoft’s plans to deploy last summer’s Windows 10 Anniversary Update within a few months, the software giant has reset its expectations for the Creators Update, which will begin rolling out in April. This time, Microsoft says, the upgrade process will occur “over a period of several months,” but on purpose, so that users will have a more “seamless” (read: error-free) experience. You might argue that this is the right approach. But I think this exposes the soft underbelly of Microsoft’s “Windows as a service” (WaaS) plans, which is that this legacy software is too big, complex, and rooted in the 1990s to work well as a service. And that what really needs to happen is a more aggressive removal of legacy technologies from the platform until WaaS can actually make sense. And yes, I’m looking at you, Win32. It’s time to make some tough decisions.

The issue that I wanted to touch on was the WaaS comment.

Windows as a Service has been a question on the lips of the world since Office 365 was introduced a few years ago. Office works as a service because the code base is finite. The components are well known and controlled. There aren’t different extensions for Office and different driver sets, needed to make it run on different processors or chipsets. It needs Windows in order to do this. Office is a much simpler “platform,” if you will, to convert to a service from a standalone product.

Windows itself is a different story entirely.

Paul is right indicating that it’s got a great deal of gunk to get rid of, before it can become a service platform. Windows has a great deal of 32bit code that needs to be ripped out of the OS, before it will be on a common enough codebase where it can be common enough and easily maintainable enough. The biggest problem is all of the different hardware combinations, requiring all of the different drivers that exist for those combinations.

Keeping all that straight and all that together from a service perspective, is going to be one hell of a job. In fact, there are products out there now that try to monitor the drivers you have on your computer and notify you when they get updated. They don’t work very well; and they’re somewhat expensive.

Windows biggest problems have always been its drivers. There are so many different devices, accessories and tools that require a driver in order to connect and work with your computer. Many of them, unfortunately, are enterprise level devices – those that are used for work – and are unfortunately tied to a 32bit driver base that needs to be retired and ripped out of the “current” version of Windows. When that happens, all those legacy devices will become unsupported.

Note – many already are. This is not a new problem. Every time a version of Windows is retired and becomes unsupported, some kind of corporate, mission critical, medical device, manufacturing sensor or label printer becomes unusable.

Dealing with this issue – driver obsolescence – is the core problem that Win32 has. Finding a way of dealing with this and with the corporate mission critical device issue is going to be what saves the whole concept of WaaS – Windows as a service – from what will likely be a very difficult start. Unfortunately, it’s going to be the enterprise market that really makes or breaks WaaS. The consumer market, while likely “easier” than the enterprise market, still has the Win32 and driver management issues to get past.

Are you interested in WaaS as either a consumer or enterprise customer? What is it about WaaS that attracts you? How big of an issue are outdated drivers and driver updates to you? Do you think that Microsoft can completely strip Win32 legacy code out of Windows to make it easier to manage and better performing in time enough for WaaS to be relevant? Is there, in fact, a time limit on this..?

I’d love to hear from you. Why don’t you meet me in the Discussion area below and give me your thoughts on WaaS, 3rd party driver update apps and services, as well as Win32 legacy code and mission critical peripherals at your place of work?

Related Posts:

Stay in touch with Soft32

Soft32.com is a software free download website that provides:

121.218 programs and games that were downloaded 237.780.356 times by 402.775 members in our Soft32.com Community!

Get the latest software updates directly to your inbox